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Will this psu be compatible with my build?

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  • PSU
  • Compatibility
  • Components
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Last response: in Components
August 11, 2014 7:43:32 AM

So I'm looking to upgrade my current PC, I'm on a somewhat low budget and here's what I'm planning on buying.

AMD FX-8320 3.5GHz 8-Core
MSI 970A-G43 ATX AM3+ Motherboard
EVGA GeForce GTX 760 2GB

I already have storage everything else except a power supply. I was planning on buying a Corsair CX750 750W, firstly is this enough wattage for my build? And will it work with the parts?

I'm also looking to upgrade my case so any suggestions would be great, thanks. I currently have a CiT Vantage Blue case, and considering my budget if that's good enough then I'd rather keep it for the time being.

I'm pretty new to building PCs so if you could consider that in your replies, just so I'll be able to understand you a little more, but any help would be appreciated, thank you.

More about : psu compatible build

August 11, 2014 8:19:06 AM

hey there i read in some posts that the corsair CX psus use crappy conducters.dont use it.u can try a gigayte odin 720 watt
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August 11, 2014 8:24:09 AM

A GTX760 will need only a 500w psu.
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
CX corsair is not bad, but there are better quality units out there.
I would look for a 600-650w Seasonic, xfx, or antec.
https://community.newegg.com/eggxpert/computer_hardware...

As a side note, the FX-8350 is very good for rendering or multithreaded apps.
For gaming, not so much. The reason is that few games actually use more than 2 cores.
Read this older report:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-processor-fr...
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Best solution

August 11, 2014 8:26:10 AM

You've selected well on your parts. The CX750 is more than powerful enough for your current upgrade list. It will enable you to run a second GTX 760 in the future if the need arises.

You should be able to enjoy that build for years to come.

On your upgrade, do you know your current ram? Also, what cooling solution will you be using for your CPU?
The 8320s are solid chips and have quite a bit of headroom for future overclocking with adequate cooling.

Your CiT case looks like a solid performing enclosure and seems flexible enough to really accommodate a lot (including all your current hardware list items)
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August 11, 2014 12:41:30 PM

dwatterworth said:
You've selected well on your parts. The CX750 is more than powerful enough for your current upgrade list. It will enable you to run a second GTX 760 in the future if the need arises.

You should be able to enjoy that build for years to come.

On your upgrade, do you know your current ram? Also, what cooling solution will you be using for your CPU?
The 8320s are solid chips and have quite a bit of headroom for future overclocking with adequate cooling.

Your CiT case looks like a solid performing enclosure and seems flexible enough to really accommodate a lot (including all your current hardware list items)


That's good to know, I may well invest in a second GTX 760 if I I think it's needed.

I currently have 8GB of DDR3 Ram, however I'm not sure of the model.
I haven't yet picked out a cooling system, will the 8320 overclock well with the motherboard? If so which CPU cooler would you recommend, budget isn't too much of a problem, it may just mean I'll have to wait a little longer before I purchase them.

Thanks for your reply
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August 11, 2014 1:13:00 PM

The memory should be good as long as it is stable in your current machine. Overall, for gaming the memory speed matters less than most other main components in the system.

The 8320 in stock configuration should run without any problems on that motherboard. The motherboard however doesn't seem to be really set up for heavy overclocking of a high wattage CPU. The 970A-G43 is rated for a 125 watt processor matching the 8320 rated (max) wattage of 125w. In reality, outside of benchmarks and multi-threaded rendering or encoding, your CPU will not see that kind of power draw in a stock configuration.

I think if the overclock done on the board was a mild one, using near stock voltage to keep additional power draw low, then it would be totally fine and reliable.

As far as cooling setups go, I think you have a lot of options in this case. There are plenty of strong options in both the air cooling and liquid cooling categories.

The starting point for aftermarket cooling will start with the Coolermaster hyper 212 evo. It's a very good bang for the buck type cooler. Buying a matching coolermaster 120mm sickle fan and running it in push/pull can produce very good cooling performance at a low budget.

Next would be the $50USD - $70 range, in which you can consider good air coolers from Gelid, Scythe, Noctua and Phanteks, some of the better options in my opinion. All of these companies offer very strong tower cooler options which have 120mm fans, stay very quiet in idle/light system loads and stay fairly quiet under full system load.

The liquid coolers at that range include the Corsair H60, H75, H80, H80i, Coolermaster 120M (or 120V), Thermaltake Water 3.0 performer and the new NZXT x31.

The next tier that would fit in your current case would be the big air coolers such as the Noctua NH-D14/D15 which directly competes and often beats the smaller closed loop liquid coolers performance and noise levels.

I don't think your system will really be in need of overclocking for very strong gaming and application performance. I'd mostly look into overclocking if you ever go for a second video card or upgrade to a future model that would cause the system to be CPU bottlenecked.
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August 11, 2014 1:24:53 PM

geofelt said:
A GTX760 will need only a 500w psu.
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
CX corsair is not bad, but there are better quality units out there.
I would look for a 600-650w Seasonic, xfx, or antec.
https://community.newegg.com/eggxpert/computer_hardware...

As a side note, the FX-8350 is very good for rendering or multithreaded apps.
For gaming, not so much. The reason is that few games actually use more than 2 cores.
Read this older report:
http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/gaming-processor-fr...


Okay, I always preferred Corsair would the CS series be a better choice? If not then I may be able to push my budget for an AX series, with the other manufacturers I am not familiar with any of their series' and even after looking at the tiered list I still wouldn't know which model to go for.

As for the CPU, I don't plan for my PC to be limited only to gaming, I'm a keen animator/digital artist and I'm starting up in game design so I would most likely be using multithreaded apps often.

Thanks for the reply
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August 11, 2014 1:37:11 PM

dwatterworth said:
The memory should be good as long as it is stable in your current machine. Overall, for gaming the memory speed matters less than most other main components in the system.

The 8320 in stock configuration should run without any problems on that motherboard. The motherboard however doesn't seem to be really set up for heavy overclocking of a high wattage CPU. The 970A-G43 is rated for a 125 watt processor matching the 8320 rated (max) wattage of 125w. In reality, outside of benchmarks and multi-threaded rendering or encoding, your CPU will not see that kind of power draw in a stock configuration.

I think if the overclock done on the board was a mild one, using near stock voltage to keep additional power draw low, then it would be totally fine and reliable.

As far as cooling setups go, I think you have a lot of options in this case. There are plenty of strong options in both the air cooling and liquid cooling categories.

The starting point for aftermarket cooling will start with the Coolermaster hyper 212 evo. It's a very good bang for the buck type cooler. Buying a matching coolermaster 120mm sickle fan and running it in push/pull can produce very good cooling performance at a low budget.

Next would be the $50USD - $70 range, in which you can consider good air coolers from Gelid, Scythe, Noctua and Phanteks, some of the better options in my opinion. All of these companies offer very strong tower cooler options which have 120mm fans, stay very quiet in idle/light system loads and stay fairly quiet under full system load.

The liquid coolers at that range include the Corsair H60, H75, H80, H80i, Coolermaster 120M (or 120V), Thermaltake Water 3.0 performer and the new NZXT x31.

The next tier that would fit in your current case would be the big air coolers such as the Noctua NH-D14/D15 which directly competes and often beats the smaller closed loop liquid coolers performance and noise levels.

I don't think your system will really be in need of overclocking for very strong gaming and application performance. I'd mostly look into overclocking if you ever go for a second video card or upgrade to a future model that would cause the system to be CPU bottlenecked.


So if you don't think overclocking would be all that benefitial with the setup I'm going to have, would a separate cooling system be neccisary for the CPU?
But if you think I should invest in a cooling setup then the $50-$70 range would be best, with quietness being somewhat of a priority - but then again if the cooling is better then I don't mind too much noise.
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August 11, 2014 1:41:52 PM

I think investing in the CPU cooling will be crucial for any rendering / encoding you do on the machine. A cpu cooler such as this one would be fantastic for performance and noise levels.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E168...

Overclocking while rendering can yield some great efficiency increases as far as time/product equations go. I've got a few overclocked render nodes for animations and large frame jobs (I'm an architect and work with tons of 3d visualization and also make all of my own workstations for personal use and at the firm I work for) that saw easy overclocks resulting in ~20% time reductions. But again, depending on your specific workload and applications, it might not benefit you greatly. I'm not sure of your workflow etc. If time is critical, then the fastest product is obviously the best. If time spent rendering isn't so essential, then stock or a mild overclock would be best.

Other than that, any of the 120mm all-in-one liquid coolers that I mentioned before will provide great cooling performance with very good noise levels.
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