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Intel® core™ i7-3770k processo 32gb support

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January 26, 2013 3:36:07 PM

Hello,
I purchased i7-3770k processor, 180GB intel SSD 520 and DZ77RE-75K. As I require to run many VM's (more than 7), I decided to purchase 32GB Ram. But product specification for i7-3770k processor in intel website is showing that Max Memory Size (dependent on memory type) is 32 GB. Anyone knows about this memory type? I am planning to buy four 8 GB DDR3 - 1600 MHz . Is it supported by i7-3770k processor?
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January 26, 2013 3:55:36 PM

Steveabraham83 said:
Hello,
I purchased i7-3770k processor, 180GB intel SSD 520 and DZ77RE-75K. As I require to run many VM's (more than 7), I decided to purchase 32GB Ram. But product specification for i7-3770k processor in intel website is showing that Max Memory Size (dependent on memory type) is 32 GB. Anyone knows about this memory type? I am planning to buy four 8 GB DDR3 - 1600 MHz . Is it supported by i7-3770k processor?


32 GB of DDR3-1600 in four 8 GB modules is supported by that processor as long as you get regular desktop memory (unbuffered, non-ECC, 1.50 volt DDR3.)

The reason they say "dependent on memory type" is that Intel uses the same template in the ARK database for all chips. Newer server chips can run either regular unbuffered desktop memory or registered server memory, as long as all memory is of the same type. Registered server memory allows for more memory modules per channel and larger module sizes compared to unbuffered desktop memory, so there can be a very significant difference (up to 6x more) in memory capacity depending on what kind of memory you are using. Your chip can only use one type of memory, unbuffered desktop memory, so Intel really should have gotten rid of the "dependent on memory type" in the data table.
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January 26, 2013 4:07:35 PM

That means intel unnecessarily confusing people.. :)  So I can install 32GB desktop memory.. Thanks a lot for the info..
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January 26, 2013 4:30:23 PM

Just to add to MU_Engineer comments...

I have a similar processor and currently running with 32GB of 1600 RAM set for X.M.P in the BIOS.
By default the sticks run at 1333MHz without X.M.P.

i.e.

XMP (eXtreme Memory Profile) is basically a non-JEDEC approved SPD table for your RAM that is programmed into the sticks. By setting XMP you can run the sticks at their RATED speed and timings even if it requires more vDIMM to do so.

For instance.

1333 MHz 9-9-9 @ 1.5v is JEDEC standard
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January 26, 2013 4:59:26 PM

max for Windows 7 premium is 16 Gigs of Ram.
As long as MB supports 8 gig Modules and you are running a higher end Windows 7 version than premium - NO problem.

For IB, go for DDr3-1600
For SB use DDR3-1333.

For Ram voltage: both SB and IB use 1.5V.

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January 26, 2013 5:48:04 PM

ELMO_2006 said:
Just to add to MU_Engineer comments...

I have a similar processor and currently running with 32GB of 1600 RAM set for X.M.P in the BIOS.
By default the sticks run at 1333MHz without X.M.P.

i.e.

XMP (eXtreme Memory Profile) is basically a non-JEDEC approved SPD table for your RAM that is programmed into the sticks. By setting XMP you can run the sticks at their RATED speed and timings even if it requires more vDIMM to do so.

For instance.

1333 MHz 9-9-9 @ 1.5v is JEDEC standard


It gets even hairier than that.

There are a lot more JEDEC approved timings out there than we commonly see. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DDR3_SDRAM" target="_blank">Wikipedia has a list. The ones we commonly see are among the slowest approved ones. For example, DDR3-1600 has a JEDEC approved timing of 8-8-8 (DDR3-1600G) yet all we generally see is 11-11-11 (DDR3-1600K) which is the slowest approved timing. There are also standard timings for 1866 and 2133 as well, although I have not yet seen any parts which advertise themselves as being JEDEC standard faster than DDR3-1600.

XMP timings are also put in a different section of the SPD than the JEDEC standard timings. Some boards' BIOSes do not recognize XMP timings and will ignore them. That generally puts you in a pickle as many boards that do not recognize XMP timings also don't allow for the user to manually force memory speed/timing settings above the JEDEC standard timings in the SPD. The only thing you can do in that case is to either get different RAM with faster timings in the JEDEC portion (Kingston's Plug and Play comes to mind) or to manually overwrite the JEDEC settings with the XMP settings by flashing the SPD. The latter is tricky to do and usually not able to be done except in a few limited circumstances. You have to have the right board, the right RAM, know the exact topology of your IMC/memory, know a decent amount about the guts of the Linux OS, and know your way around a RAM SPD dump with a hex editor well enough to know what you are doing is actually working. [/quote]
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