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A rig for Planetside 2... need lots of performance but on a budget

Hi,
I have been thinking about building my own computer for 3 months now and have finally signed up for Tom's Hardware to ask about parts and the total outcome. As I want to play Planetside 2, I need a lot of performance.

I have been looking all over the place for cheap parts. I have even been thinking about repairing broken-down parts and buying them cheap. Is it possible to repair completely broken down GPUs for an amateur? I have heard about un-soldering/re-soldering blown capacitors, and about the oven trick, but will they work for most broken-down GPUs?

What I know for certain is that I want the HAF 912 Case for $50.

As for CPUs, I am looking at AMD's FX 8320 or 8350. Will PS2 make use of all those cores? Or will they go to waste? I have heard AMD is good at multitasking while intel is good at performance. I am just not sure about spending $335 on a i7 3790K. Is there a way I could get it at around $170?

If I get an intel i7, I'm looking at msi gaming motherboards, for ~$150. Would I need a network and sound card for this motherboard? Or will the internet and sound work fine without them?

OR is there a cheaper better motherboard than that for AMD?

I'm also thinking of buying 6 to 8 GB of RAM.

I will also salvage a stock 500 GB harddrive from a 4 year old computer. Or I'll buy a WD Blue 7200RPM but I don't know how many GB I'll need. I might use both hard drive at the same time.
I'll also salvage the old optical disk.

For the GPU, I'm thinking about a used AMD R9 270X for $75. Would it be better to have 2 of them working together or get a nVidia GTX 760 since nVidia has the driver updates specifically for PS2. Will the driver update and 760 be better than 2 270Xs?

Lastly, what power supply would I need for that? I think 750w?

Thanks in advance

P.S. I do NOT intend to Over Clock
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about rig planetside lots performance budget
  1. PS2 does not work well with AMD, you will want to go with Intel. What is your total budget for this rig? There are better cases than the 912's price range.
  2. well, I have $2000 but I'd like to use less than $1000. Honestly the 912 costs only $50 bucks and I needed a cheap cooling case so I chose that one.
  3. If you are building your own and want to cut costs I'll give the same suggestion I always give. Cut costs by saving on the non-obsolete parts. Look in your area for an electronic recycler. If you don't have a local electronic recycler, then all the old computer parts that businesses recycle go to your local scrap yard. A scrap yard will be happy to sell you an optical mouse, a usb keyboard, a set of cheap business speakers, a dvd burner, a business style computer chair, 100-300 gb hard drives, maybe a 17 inch or 19 inch flatscreen monitor, a monster full tower case, some dusty super high powered server fans perfect for modding onto a case. You just have to look online for a place and go see in person what you can find. Don't forget to haggle.

    Price it above scrap value, and you save them the labor of scrapping it out. A win for them, a win for you, and a win for the environment. Yea Earth!

    As for doing component level repair on parts......in my experience that only works for atleast 3+ years or more old lcd's and mobo's. Use the money saved to put towards new core parts.
  4. PCPartPicker part list: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/8kKQK8
    Price breakdown by merchant: http://pcpartpicker.com/p/8kKQK8/by_merchant/

    CPU: Intel Core i5-4690K 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($209.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($34.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-Z97MX-Gaming 5 Micro ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($113.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1600 Memory ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($55.98 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte Radeon R9 280X 3GB WINDFORCE Video Card ($279.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Cooler Master HAF 912 ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.00 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair Enthusiast 650W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($85.98 @ Newegg)
    Total: $895.91
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-08-22 19:04 EDT-0400

    Less than $1000 as you wanted. Only not sure if already had a Monitor and OS?
  5. OK. Thank you guys for your replies. I do not know if there is an electronic recycler in the area, and have never been to a scrap yard. I also don't know how easy it would be to be digging in a big pile of broken electronics to try to find a graphics card (is that how it works?)

    As for Mouldread's reply, is a i5 as good as an i7 for PS2?
    Quoted from above: "PS2 does not work well with AMD, you will want to go with Intel."
    Is that true? I could buy a fx 8350 for less than the i5 listed above, and potentially get better specs than the i5?

    I do plan on buying a lot of used parts. IDK if that is a bad Idea, is it a better idea to buy all new?
  6. Look at the picture below.

    Intel i5 4670K (which is almost identical to the 4690K) Min FPS - 51, Average FPS - 57, Max FPS - 59
    Intel i7 4770K Min FPS - 53, Average FPS - 57, Max FPS - 58
    AMD FX 8350 Min FPS - 32, Average FPS - 45, Max FPS - 53



    Buying used parts could bring in a lot of headaches. If something breaks you will have no cover, you won't be able to get your money back or get a free repair or replacement. Not to mention a lot of people have totally abused their GPUs and CPUs whether it being by overclocking them with poor cooling or using them for bit-coin mining etc.

    I think it's a better idea to buy at least your motherboard, PSU, CPU and GPU new.
  7. But this only goes up to i7 4770K. it seemse like i5 and i7 4770K are similar in performance. Would a 4790K be a big boost?
  8. Best answer
    Considering that they also ran the 4770k @ 4.5ghz, I would say the 4790k isn't going to make a bit of difference. I went a little over $1k, but that is because I went with a better GPU.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1231 V3 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($247.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($69.30 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.92 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: XFX Radeon R9 290 4GB Double Dissipation Video Card ($409.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair SPEC-02 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.95 @ B&H)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($13.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $1004.11
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-08-25 09:46 EDT-0400

    With a 280x

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Xeon E3-1231 V3 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($247.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: ASRock H97 PRO4 ATX LGA1150 Motherboard ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ares Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR3-1866 Memory ($69.30 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($52.92 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Sapphire Radeon R9 280X 3GB Dual-X Video Card ($284.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair SPEC-02 ATX Mid Tower Case ($49.99 @ Micro Center)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA NEX 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.95 @ B&H)
    Optical Drive: LG GH24NSB0 DVD/CD Writer ($13.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $879.11
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2014-08-25 09:47 EDT-0400
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