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Which SSD should I get for my new system ? Compatibilities and differences

My system:

FX 8350 @4.0 GHZ (COOLER MASTER SEIDON 120V)
CORSAIR 2X4GB 1600MHZ CL9 RAM
R9 280X SAPPHIRE DUAL-X OC
GIGABYTE 970A-UD3P
AOPEN 650W 12V 624W 52A BRONZE PSU
WINDOWS 8.1 X64 CORE EDITION.

SAMSUNG HD753LJ (Using it in AHCI MODE)

My knowledge on storage devices is not good enough so I've opened this thread.

Does my mobo's chipset compatible with all ssds ?

I only use my pc for gaming so here's my questions, can I use my old samsung hdd (6 years old) with my sdd as a storage ?

I am planning to install windows and games to the ssd so can I just move my files from my hdd to the ssd when I want (Like from C:/ to D:/) ? If so, what would be the transferring speed ?

I've been thinking about getting a SATA 3 ssd that has around 250gb space but I can't be sure which one to choose. Why there are 240gb, 250gb and 256 gb ones and what are their advantages or disadvantages.

My old hdd still alive so, does ssds have a longer life than hdds ? Is formatting them shorten their life ?

My mobo is SATA 3 I don't know that how my hdd connected to my mobo so should I get a special cable for an ssd connection ?

If I get myself a new ssd, will I have to configure my BIOS for it ?

Only these ssds are avaible in my country so what would you suggest ?

Samsung 250GB 840 EVO
Kingston 240GB V300
Sandisk 256GB Ultra Plus

I don't want to pay more for like any pro features that I dont know
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about ssd system compatibilities differences
  1. I would recommend the samsung SSD, they make very good quality drives and you will not be disappointed.

    Yes you can use your older HDD as storage, you will need to reinstall the games to your new SSD, you can not simply copy/paste the content from one hard drive to another, but there are ways to copy the large bulk parts of games so you do not have to re-download it all, you would want to look up how to do that on a per game basis though.

    You do not need any kind of special cabled for the SSD, it uses the same SATA cable that your current drive and probably optical drive uses. Formatting your SSD over and over again can potentially shorten it's life but it's not something I would be worried about, you would need to format your drive many times over before any effect would be felt. I would say that the current SSDs will have a lifespan on par with a traditional HDD, but you can always google this for a little more in depth information.
  2. Best answer
    1) Real-world performance would feel identical for similar SSD's.

    2) Samsung has the best software to manage them (Samsung Magician) whereas Sandisk has better prices.

    3) 120GB should be sufficient for Windows and applications.

    4) STEAM, Games, media, and Windows backups can be put on the HDD.

    5) *Games do NOT run better on an SSD aside from the loading times. I tested this extensively. I now have games like SKYRIM on an SSD however due to the frequent load times (jumping around map; entering dungeons...).

    *You can MOVE Steam games between Steam folders. Here's how:
    a) Create another Steam folder on an SSD (or use 2nd partition of the main 250GB one)
    b) BACKUP the Steam game
    c) DELETE the Steam game
    d) RESTORE the Steam game but now choose the 2nd Steam folder on the SSD
    e) DELETE the backup to save space if you wish (I keep only games with mods as backups in case I need to reinstall Vanilla version from scratch)

    Now you've MOVED from the hard drive to SSD. If you need the space you can then MOVE or just create a backup of a game you aren't playing currently on the SSD. SAVE GAMES should have no issues as they are usually on the C-drive and work after moving the game itself.

    6) I would expect no compatibility issues on a modern board. I did have a problem with an 1156 motherboard that a BIOS update fixed.

    7) Your 6-year-old drive might be too old to be reliable or too small in capacity.


    Summary:
    I hope the above info helps. One of the best combos I've been recommending through pcpartpicker as a guide is a 128GB Sandisk SSD ($65) and a 1TB HDD from Seagate or WD (blue) for about $58.
  3. Definitely a Samsung EVO. And additional Info:

    Copying files:

    HDD - SSD = BLAZING FAST
    SSD - HDD = Depends on your Hdd write speed.

    The read speeds of HDDs are usually the bigger numbers so the read speed might just catch up with the write speed of the SSD.
  4. Intel Celeron said:
    Definitely a Samsung EVO. And additional Info:

    Copying files:

    HDD - SSD = BLAZING FAST
    SSD - HDD = Depends on your Hdd write speed.

    The read speeds of HDDs are usually the bigger numbers so the read speed might just catch up with the write speed of the SSD.


    HDD's aren't going to "catch up" to an SSD in any way as SSD speeds are increasing faster than hard drives. Also, the small file read/write speeds are more important and there's a HUGE difference there.
  5. burdenbound said:
    I would recommend the samsung SSD, they make very good quality drives and you will not be disappointed.

    Yes you can use your older HDD as storage, you will need to reinstall the games to your new SSD, you can not simply copy/paste the content from one hard drive to another, but there are ways to copy the large bulk parts of games so you do not have to re-download it all, you would want to look up how to do that on a per game basis though.

    You do not need any kind of special cabled for the SSD, it uses the same SATA cable that your current drive and probably optical drive uses. Formatting your SSD over and over again can potentially shorten it's life but it's not something I would be worried about, you would need to format your drive many times over before any effect would be felt. I would say that the current SSDs will have a lifespan on par with a traditional HDD, but you can always google this for a little more in depth information.


    Anonymous said:
    1) Real-world performance would feel identical for similar SSD's.

    2) Samsung has the best software to manage them (Samsung Magician) whereas Sandisk has better prices.

    3) 120GB should be sufficient for Windows and applications.

    4) STEAM, Games, media, and Windows backups can be put on the HDD.

    5) *Games do NOT run better on an SSD aside from the loading times. I tested this extensively. I now have games like SKYRIM on an SSD however due to the frequent load times (jumping around map; entering dungeons...).

    *You can MOVE Steam games between Steam folders. Here's how:
    a) Create another Steam folder on an SSD (or use 2nd partition of the main 250GB one)
    b) BACKUP the Steam game
    c) DELETE the Steam game
    d) RESTORE the Steam game but now choose the 2nd Steam folder on the SSD
    e) DELETE the backup to save space if you wish (I keep only games with mods as backups in case I need to reinstall Vanilla version from scratch)

    Now you've MOVED from the hard drive to SSD. If you need the space you can then MOVE or just create a backup of a game you aren't playing currently on the SSD. SAVE GAMES should have no issues as they are usually on the C-drive and work after moving the game itself.

    6) I would expect no compatibility issues on a modern board. I did have a problem with an 1156 motherboard that a BIOS update fixed.

    7) Your 6-year-old drive might be too old to be reliable or too small in capacity.


    Summary:
    I hope the above info helps. One of the best combos I've been recommending through pcpartpicker as a guide is a 128GB Sandisk SSD ($65) and a 1TB HDD from Seagate or WD (blue) for about $58.


    Thank you for your detailed reply, I have another question to ask, Can I acces my files in hdd while Im booted up with my SSD ?
  6. Yes you will be able to access the files on your HDD after you have installed the OS on your SSD. I recommend keeping your current HDD unplugged from the system when you install the OS on your SSD.
  7. Thank you all !
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