Issues with internet disconnecting when wired computer switched on

Hi, I'm having an unusual issue with the internet setup in my house. There is a desktop connected directly to the router (BT Home Hub 3) and all other devices (phones, laptops etc) are connected wirelessly. Recently, I have noticed an issue where as soon as the main desktop connects to the internet, the wireless signal will cut out for every other device in the house. Out of the 3 usual connections that I have from the hub, BT-Hub3-, BTWifi-X, BTWifi-with-Fon, the main connection will disappear entirely. This is only a temporary issue and will be fine after a couple of minutes, however it is a pain and something I would like to resolve. Also, I have another router (http://www.dlink.com/uk/en/home-solutions/connect/routers/dir-810l-wireless-ac750-dual-band-router) but am unsure on how to properly configure the Home Hub as the modem for it.
Thanks for any information.
14 answers Last reply
More about issues internet disconnecting wired computer switched
  1. Sounds like a problem with the router, could be an issue with dhcp, could be something screwy in the wireless hardware.

    Have you tried power cycling the router?
  2. Is the home hub a router and modem or just router? If it is just a router then you should be able to just remove the hub 3 and put your dlink router in
  3. This router's been switched off and on, reset countless times due to the multiple issues that we've had with it.
  4. Sometimes it pays to track down the problem. Sometimes it's easier just to implement an alternative solution. The latter would seem to be the case here.

    • Assign the DLink router's WAN a static IP address on your existing Home Hub network.
    • On the Home Hub, set the DMZ to that static IP address.
    • Disable the Home Hub's wireless access point (turn it off).
    • Move all connected devices to the DLink router.
    • Don't connect anything to the Home Hub again.


    The DMZ setting tells the Home Hub to just forward everything it gets from the Internet to the DLink router. Once you do that, for all intents and purposes the DLink router is your main router and you can ignore the Home Hub. Wireless should be controlled and managed by the DLink.

    You only need to mess with the Home Hub if you do port forwarding. Ports need to be forwarded on both the DLink (to the device needing the port) and on the Home Hub (to the DLink's WAN).

    If your disconnect problem persists on the DLink, it's likely a hardware fault with the desktop computer's network card which is somehow shorting out the router.
  5. boosted1g said:
    Is the home hub a router and modem or just router? If it is just a router then you should be able to just remove the hub 3 and put your dlink router in


    No, the modem and router are both part of the Home Hub, I already tried just replacing it but it didn't work (ironically I still managed to get further in the setup that when I was using the Home Hub as a modem.)
  6. Solandri said:
    Sometimes it pays to track down the problem. Sometimes it's easier just to implement an alternative solution. The latter would seem to be the case here.

    • Assign the DLink router's WAN a static IP address on your existing Home Hub network.
    • On the Home Hub, set the DMZ to that static IP address.
    • Disable the Home Hub's wireless access point (turn it off).
    • Move all connected devices to the DLink router.
    • Don't connect anything to the Home Hub again.


    The DMZ setting tells the Home Hub to just forward everything it gets from the Internet to the DLink router. Once you do that, for all intents and purposes the DLink router is your main router and you can ignore the Home Hub. Wireless should be controlled and managed by the DLink.

    You only need to mess with the Home Hub if you do port forwarding. Ports need to be forwarded on both the DLink (to the device needing the port) and on the Home Hub (to the DLink's WAN).

    If your disconnect problem persists on the DLink, it's likely a hardware fault with the desktop computer's network card which is somehow shorting out the router.


    How would I assign the router a static IP, is that in the Home Hub settings?

    Edit: I think I've found the page, do I need to plug the router into the Home Hub so it shows up on the device list, or just powered on, also do I need the drivers installed for it?
  7. Dylzan said:
    How would I assign the router a static IP, is that in the Home Hub settings?

    Sorry, sometimes I assume a certain level of technical expertise to try to keep the reply short.

    On your desktop PC connected to the Home Hub, open up a command prompt. Just search for the program cmd and run it. In the command prompt, type: ipconfig /all

    Under the entry for Wireless Network or LAN adapter, there should be the following entries:

    IP address: 192.168.0.132 (usually it's 192.168.0.x, but it can be other numbers)
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0 (this is what it's usually set as)
    Gateway: 192.168.0.1

    If the subnet mask is not 255.255.255.0, tell us because I'm going to assume it is for the following settings.

    For a DMZ configuration, I usually pick an IP address whose last digit is 1 or 9 higher than the gateway. e.g. Since the gateway is 192.168.0.1, I'll pick 192.168.0.2 or 192.168.0.10.

    Go to the Home Hub's configuration page at 192.168.0.1 (or whatever your gateway is). Look for a setting called DMZ. It's usually on the same page as port forwarding, or near it. Enable it and set it to the IP address you picked above, e.g. 192.168.0.10.

    Now plug a computer into the DLink router and go to its configuration settings. Find the WAN port settings. The WAN port is usually configured via DHCP. You need to change this to Static IP. Once you do, a bunch of new settings will pop up.
    • Set the IP Address to what you've selected above, e.g. 192.168.0.10
    • Set the subnet mask to the same as above, e.g. 255.255.255.0
    • Set the gateway to the same as above, e.g. 192.168.0.1
    • Set DNS to the same as the gateway. Or if you don't like BT's "site not found" landing pages you can set it to 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 (Google), or 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220 (OpenDNS). If you have kids, you probably want OpenDNS, as they offer ways to block things like porn sites (go to their website for more info).


    If you did all this correctly, you should now be able to plug the DLink's WAN port into one of the Home Hub's LAN ports, and any devices connected to the DLink should get Internet access. Test some trickier Internet apps like Skype to make sure the DMZ setting is working.
  8. I'm decent when it comes to most things, but configuring networks etc isn't one of them :P. I'll try that later on and get back to you on the results.
  9. Solandri said:
    Dylzan said:
    How would I assign the router a static IP, is that in the Home Hub settings?

    Sorry, sometimes I assume a certain level of technical expertise to try to keep the reply short.

    On your desktop PC connected to the Home Hub, open up a command prompt. Just search for the program cmd and run it. In the command prompt, type: ipconfig /all

    Under the entry for Wireless Network or LAN adapter, there should be the following entries:

    IP address: 192.168.0.132 (usually it's 192.168.0.x, but it can be other numbers)
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0 (this is what it's usually set as)
    Gateway: 192.168.0.1

    If the subnet mask is not 255.255.255.0, tell us because I'm going to assume it is for the following settings.

    For a DMZ configuration, I usually pick an IP address whose last digit is 1 or 9 higher than the gateway. e.g. Since the gateway is 192.168.0.1, I'll pick 192.168.0.2 or 192.168.0.10.

    Go to the Home Hub's configuration page at 192.168.0.1 (or whatever your gateway is). Look for a setting called DMZ. It's usually on the same page as port forwarding, or near it. Enable it and set it to the IP address you picked above, e.g. 192.168.0.10.

    Now plug a computer into the DLink router and go to its configuration settings.

    Got to this step, then no further. Default gateway was .1.254, changed to .0.1 with the new router added on. However, I couldn't load up the config settings for the router, came up saying that it couldn't connect to the page.
  10. Dylzan said:
    Got to this step, then no further. Default gateway was .1.254, changed to .0.1 with the new router added on.

    The DLink router should not be added on yet. It should be standing alone with just the computer plugged into one of its LAN ports.
    Quote:
    However, I couldn't load up the config settings for the router, came up saying that it couldn't connect to the page.

    So your computer is connected to the DLink router via a LAN port, ipconfig reports the gateway as 192.168.0.1, but your web browser says couldn't connect when you give it http://192.168.0.1 as a URL?

    Try https://192.168.0.1.

    Try typing the following in a command prompt:
    ipconfig /release
    ipconfig /renew

    If that doesn't work try resetting the DLink router.
  11. Solandri said:
    Dylzan said:
    Got to this step, then no further. Default gateway was .1.254, changed to .0.1 with the new router added on. However, I couldn't load up the config settings for the router, came up saying that it couldn't connect to the page.

    So your computer is connected to the DLink router, ipconfig reports the gateway as 192.168.0.1, but your web browser says couldn't connect when you give it http://192.168.0.1 as a URL?

    Try https://192.168.0.1.

    Try typing the following in a command prompt:
    ipconfig /release
    ipconfig /renew

    If that doesn't work try resetting the DLink router.

    I tried that IP and also the dlink.local that it gave in the instructions. I also reset it. Oddly enough it worked a couple of months ago when I wrongly had the wire plugged from the phoneline into the router but now I can't even get that far.
  12. Try running the DLink disk that came with the router. I've seen a couple which are set up stupidly so you have to do initial setup with the disk. Afterwards, they work like a normal router.
  13. Solandri said:
    Try running the DLink disk that came with the router. I've seen a couple which are set up stupidly so you have to do initial setup with the disk. Afterwards, they work like a normal router.


    Tried that as well, turns out that that just contains the quick start guide and manual, no drivers or anything.
  14. Try a 30-30-30 reset then. If that doesn't work, probably a defective router.

    http://compnetworking.about.com/b/2009/03/11/the-30-30-30-hard-reset-rule-for-routers.htm
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