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Things you need to know about power supplies

Ok, i might build a new gaming pc. But this time, i want to do it myself! I have just 1 question: i dont know that much about power supplies, i know 3 things: 1. 80+ certified, 2. how much watt to choose 3. take a brand with a good reputation. but with all the 24 pin, 16 pin 4 pin? does that even excist? i know nothing about it, i dont know if i choose a power supply if it can supply all the components.
Thanks
Laurens
17 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about things power supplies
  1. Best answer
    anything from a good manufacturer will come with all the wires you need to power your system providing you buy on with enough power to actually do what you want, for example the PSU I have is a GS800, which I bought after needed to upgrade the GS600, the 600 only had 2 PCIe power cables for graphics cards, which the 800 has 4, because it is powerful enough to supply 4 cables with all the power they could need
  2. eXtreme Power Supply Calculator gives you an idea of what the power consumption of the system will be. Just realize that the calculator is based on mostly reference design components. Non-reference design graphics cards that draw more power will not be accurately represented.

    http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

    When choosing a power supply unit the maximum combined +12 Volt continuous current rating is the most important power supply specification followed by the number and types of PCI Express supplementary power connectors it provides.
  3. When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!
  4. yatys93 said:
    anything from a good manufacturer will come with all the wires you need to power your system providing you buy on with enough power to actually do what you want, for example the PSU I have is a GS800, which I bought after needed to upgrade the GS600, the 600 only had 2 PCIe power cables for graphics cards, which the 800 has 4, because it is powerful enough to supply 4 cables with all the power they could need

    yeah the only thing i know about pci is that it is a port on the mobo, and you have like x8 x16 but if you go some more in depth i dont really get it, by the way. i did some research, Corsair RM 450W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply. What are the advantages of fully modular PSU's? and what does semi modular mean? And thank you for anwsering all these questions :)
  5. MystoPigz said:
    When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!

    why no CX and CS series? Arent they good for gaming pc's?
  6. kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!

    why no CX and CS series? Arent they good for gaming pc's?



    For gaming, no. For common office work? Yes. Why not for gaming? The CX and CS series have bad quality components (Especially their capacitors) which would have a hard time playing today's games.
  7. MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!

    why no CX and CS series? Arent they good for gaming pc's?



    For gaming, no. For common office work? Yes. Why not for gaming? The CX and CS series have bad quality components (Especially their capacitors) which would have a hard time playing today's games.


    could you be so kindly and take a look at this build?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/user/kwaazaa/saved/LmMgXL
  8. kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!

    why no CX and CS series? Arent they good for gaming pc's?



    For gaming, no. For common office work? Yes. Why not for gaming? The CX and CS series have bad quality components (Especially their capacitors) which would have a hard time playing today's games.


    could you be so kindly and take a look at this build?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/user/kwaazaa/saved/LmMgXL


    Yes, your build is great!
  9. MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!

    why no CX and CS series? Arent they good for gaming pc's?



    For gaming, no. For common office work? Yes. Why not for gaming? The CX and CS series have bad quality components (Especially their capacitors) which would have a hard time playing today's games.


    could you be so kindly and take a look at this build?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/user/kwaazaa/saved/LmMgXL


    Yes, your build is great!


    PSU too? is everything compatible? Thanks by the way :D
  10. kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!

    why no CX and CS series? Arent they good for gaming pc's?



    For gaming, no. For common office work? Yes. Why not for gaming? The CX and CS series have bad quality components (Especially their capacitors) which would have a hard time playing today's games.


    could you be so kindly and take a look at this build?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/user/kwaazaa/saved/LmMgXL


    Yes, your build is great!


    PSU too? is everything compatible? Thanks by the way :D


    Yes, everything is compatible. The PSU is a great choice. :)
  11. MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    kwaazaa said:
    MystoPigz said:
    When choosing a power supply, get one that has at least an 80+ Bronze rating. Also try to get one from either Seasonic, Antec, XFX, or Corsair (If you are getting a power supply from Corsair, avoid the CX and CS series unless your PC is going to be doing common office work). Calculate the PSU wattage by going to a power supply calculator website (Extreme Outervision, Cooler Master, etc). You can get the bare minimum, but that would not support future upgrades. If you are going to have multiple graphics cards, make sure your power supply has enough 6+2 pin power connectors. If you do not know which connector connects where on you motherboard, check your motherboard manual. It will tell you about each connector and what it is for. Hope this helps!

    why no CX and CS series? Arent they good for gaming pc's?



    For gaming, no. For common office work? Yes. Why not for gaming? The CX and CS series have bad quality components (Especially their capacitors) which would have a hard time playing today's games.


    could you be so kindly and take a look at this build?
    http://pcpartpicker.com/user/kwaazaa/saved/LmMgXL


    Yes, your build is great!


    PSU too? is everything compatible? Thanks by the way :D


    Yes, everything is compatible. The PSU is a great choice. :)


    <3
  12. MystoPigz said:
    Yes, everything is compatible. The PSU is a great choice. :)


    Based on what? Have you seen the customer feedback on that model? Seems to have reliability issues.

    EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/evga-power-supply-220gs0550v1
  13. ko888 said:
    MystoPigz said:
    Yes, everything is compatible. The PSU is a great choice. :)


    Based on what? Have you seen the customer feedback on that model? Seems to have reliability issues.

    EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W
    http://pcpartpicker.com/part/evga-power-supply-220gs0550v1

    some people say the EVGA power supplies are pretty sh*tty too
  14. All in all, the best of the best power supplies come from Seasonic and Antec.
  15. The EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W is made by Seasonic.

    EVGA doesn't make PSUs because they don't have any PSU manufacturing facilities.
  16. ko888 said:
    The EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W is made by Seasonic.

    EVGA doesn't make PSUs because they don't have any PSU manufacturing facilities.

    oh. but then why is there standing EVGA
  17. kwaazaa said:
    ko888 said:
    The EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W is made by Seasonic.

    EVGA doesn't make PSUs because they don't have any PSU manufacturing facilities.

    oh. but then why is there standing EVGA


    The only EVGA PSUs that I'll recommend are the models that are made by Seasonic or Super Flower. I don't recommend any of the EVGA models that are made by Acbel Polytech, HEC or FSP.
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