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Question Regarding UPS & it's output type and related questions

So I have recently built a PC with Corsair 550w PSU and a UPS CyberPower BU600E - 600VA UPS, I did research well on all the other parts of the computer but the UPS was suggested by the retailer, I don't have problems with the fact that it take long time to get recharged and backup only 15 mins but I've few questions that really bothering me -

1> They call it AVR Most probably (not sure) stimulated sine wave which is not pure sine wave, so can it be not good for longevity for both the PSU and my 21" 1080p benq gaming monitor? Can it damage my parts?

2> Again I'm confused - is the output from UPS is always modified through avr (non pure sine wave) or only during power cut when the computer is running by the batteries of the ups, if so it is not concern as I'm not going to run computer during power cut

3> It has a problem too, I run computer for more than 12 hours a day, even without single power cut, for 2-3 times a day ups get auto start after sudden off imidiately

4> Should I replace this ups with pure sine wave ups, suggest something pls, low budget and don't need long time back up, just to get the time to shut down the pc,

5> Also is it safe to run both CPU and monitor without any ups/stabilizer considering we may have one power cut a day? Corsair vs550 w claim to give stable power supply after all, I'm from India.
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about question ups output type related questions
  1. 1 - it's not perfect, but most regular equipment should handle it fine.

    2 - only during power outage when the UPS has to switch over to using the battery + inverter circuit

    3 - could be the UPS doing a self test? mine do that but maybe once a week or once a month

    4 - if it works, then leave it alone for now. half of the cost is the battery, so maybe look at replacing the whole unit when the battery is in need of replacement. could be 3 years from now

    5 - usually monitor only takes 30W or so, which means yes you can probably use both PC and monitor at the same time.


    HOWEVER - 600VA is not the same as 600W. it's really more like 300W. so no overclocking or powerful graphics cards, please.
  2. 2- Is that also means, during normal power supply it don't rectify voltage fluctuation, because if it do, it will provide AVR (stimulated sine wave/stepped wave) same at the time during power cut or low voltage.

    3- Well if it's self test, it should not 2-3 times a day, that shuts down machine which hamper the machine I guess.

    4- If it's hampering /damaging my costly parts of my computer I'd replace it without hesitation as the UPS is not too costly itself.

    5- Oh I don't mean that both monitor and CPU is plunged in together with ups, my question is to remove the ups and plug in wall socket.

    Well I don't have dedicated graphics card, only integrated hd4600 but in fututure I'll.

    THNX FOR ALL THE ANSWERS, MUCH APPRICIATED.
  3. Best answer
    2 - during normal operation when you have house power, the UPS might have extra circuitry to adjust for low/high voltage. mine does, for example, but it also outputs a pure sine wave when running from the batteries. but most computer power supplies can handle small variations in house voltage, so usually it's nothing to be concerned about especially when you're not running a heavy load.

    3 - ok, if it's shutting down everything, that might be a real problem. even if the battery is dead, it should only give you an alarm and not shut off completely.

    5 - oh, sure, you can but if you get a power outage every day, then that's a perfect reason to actually have a UPS! a normal computer power supply cannot handle any power outage - some can't even handle 1/4th of an AC cycle, which is 50Hz or 60Hz! that's 16 milliseconds (ms). many computer power supplies shut off if there's no power for just 10ms, even though the ATX specification says it has to meet a 16ms time. a GOOD proper UPS will change from AC power to battery power in 4ms or so.
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