ADSL Keeps dying despite having replaced everything.

So my ISP, Spark claims that there's nothing wrong on their end. Yet every single day without fault, our internet dies. My modem/routers run perfectly fine and are not overheating, they've had every single cable and filter replaced and yet still the ADSL light on them dies every time, there's no build up in latency to the disconnection, it just happens immediately and out of nowhere, sometimes it's in the morning, other times it's late at night.

It's beginning to really get on my nerves, if I've replaced the Modem/Router, the power boxes for them and all the cables then what could the issue be? Aside from bad power I can't figure anything out.

The Modem/Routers I use are:

Belkin Wireless N Router.

TP-LINK TD-W8960N

I simply don't understand how if I've replaced everything that there's no issues on the ISPs side.

Any ideas? Thanks for reading.
14 answers Last reply
More about adsl dying replaced
  1. Do you have a monitored house alarm? It's common for them to interrupt the phone line so they can phone home once a day.
  2. Someone Somewhere said:
    Do you have a monitored house alarm? It's common for them to interrupt the phone line so they can phone home once a day.


    I don't no, but the people infront of me have a house alarm, we have a shared drive way. Perhaps that could be the case?
  3. Unless they share a phone line or someone's seriously screwed up on wiring the phone, no.

    Does it happen at the same time every day? Can you post the logs from the modem/router after it's dropped?
  4. Someone Somewhere said:
    Unless they share a phone line or someone's seriously screwed up on wiring the phone, no.

    Does it happen at the same time every day? Can you post the logs from the modem/router after it's dropped?


    I'd love to post logs, but in order to get my internet back up and running I have the power cycle the thing which clears the log. Here's what it does have so far.

    Log File
    System log:
    Jan 1 00:00:19 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: udhcpd (v0.9.9-pre) started
    Jan 1 00:00:21 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: received REQUEST
    Jan 1 00:00:21 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: received DISCOVER
    Jan 1 00:00:23 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: sending OFFER of 192.168.2.2
    Jan 1 00:00:23 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: received REQUEST
    Jan 1 00:00:23 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: sending ACK to 192.168.2.2
    Jan 1 00:00:27 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: received REQUEST
    Jan 1 00:00:28 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: received DISCOVER
    Jan 1 00:00:30 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: sending OFFER of 192.168.2.3
    Jan 1 00:00:30 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: received REQUEST
    Jan 1 00:00:30 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: sending ACK to 192.168.2.3
    Jan 1 00:00:34 localhost user.crit syslog: ADSL Training Started!!
    Jan 1 00:00:37 localhost user.crit syslog: ADSL link up!!
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.notice pppd[2329]: pppd 2.4.2 started by root, uid 0
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.debug pppd[2329]: using channel 1
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.notice pppd[2329]: Connect: ppp0 <--> 0.0.100
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.notice pppd[2329]: PAP authentication succeeded
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.notice pppd[2329]: local IP address 122.60.188.177
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.notice pppd[2329]: remote IP address 122.58.238.1
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.notice pppd[2329]: primary DNS address 122.56.237.1
    Jan 1 00:00:54 localhost daemon.notice pppd[2329]: secondary DNS address 210.55.111.1
    Jan 1 00:05:21 localhost local0.info udhcpd[1296]: Timed out. Exiting
    Jan 1 00:27:40 localhost user.crit syslog: User from 192.168.2.2 login success !

    I really do think it's the ISP, I don't understand how I could be responsible for the disconnections.

    Also the last massive spike it went on was happening around about 9-10:30am , sometime the connection would be lost instantly multiple times, needing up to 5 reboots, no matter the modem/router.
  5. That shows it starting from being turned off - normally, rebooting clears the logs. Do you have the logs from between it being the ADSL dropping and you rebooting it?
  6. Someone Somewhere said:
    That shows it starting from being turned off - normally, rebooting clears the logs. Do you have the logs from between it being the ADSL dropping and you rebooting it?


    Yeah, I'm aware, I don't have the logs as previously stated since the power-cycle clears the logs. What I can say is sometimes, with the Belkin Router when I go to reboot it from it's firmware I notice it says it's 'restarting' yet really all that's happened is the ADSL light is off, as is the internet light.
  7. So my understanding is that it is completely losing power? Not just loosing internet and requiring a reboot right?

    Get a plug tester. *roughly 8$. Check your plugs that you have it connected to. If the devices have been replaced and are still losing power then it is most likely something up with your outlet.
    Is anything else losing power? IE plugged into a surge protector and when it goes down so does your pc or w/e.

    If it's not losing power and only losing internet. Trace the phone line that comes to your modem. See if it seems weathered, damaged, plastic is broken/split exposed wiring etc. Most ISPS will replace the phone line if it's damaged and is typically part of the plan you pay for. Ours is a $3 monthly fee that covers it. We used to have issues similar to yours and come to find out it was shorting out because the phone cable was so old that some of the copper was exposed. And like yours we would have to reboot every time in order to get service again.
  8. I'm a technician at a small phone company. Generally whoever you talk to on the phone is not going to know what to look for from the equipment on their end from a intermittent type of issue. TP link is not a product i would recommend for stability in general, in their lower end gear especially. Lets just pretend we know for sure it is a good dsl modem

    DSL light going out generally means the modem could not keep the ADSL connection at the current speed and needs to resync to find out what rate it can sync up and maintain (retraining). I'd relate it to cell phone calls, if the other end is cutting out, its cause something interfered with that signal. call drops at a certain threshold.

    The dumbest cause to instability would be a DSL filter between jack and modem, rather than in front of the phones. A DSL filter just gets rid of the audible dsl tones. DSL could still operate under 7 meg with a filter on the line, but any last straw of signal interference on the line, any distortion between the modem and the ISP would make it retrain because it is already trying so hard.
    If you have a direct tv / dish box still connected to your phone line, that is a possibility. If picking up or receiving calls causes it, I would move on to look into bad wiring.

    Bad wiring is usually the cause, or invited another cause. a large category to me:
    Outside the wire may be worn and damaged from weather, outside is chipped and cracked, a mouse nibbled on it under the deck, etc.
    Inside, especially with older homes, poor quality and workmanship, or the addition of phone lines and rigging them to make it work good enough for dial tone. Dial tone can work over just about any bad wiring situation. DSL is much more picky. If you have visible access to any wiring in the home, just follow all the phone wiring in the basement or wherever you can find them between the jacks and outside. If you see damaged spots, or a wad of electrical tape trying to bring together phone wiring, anything that looks sketchy or rigged in general, those could be a cause of dropping, especially at 7 meg plus speeds. Top cause in this category is using electrical tape as an acceptable splice. Newer houses it is usually just electrician did a bad job on the cat5 terminations. or bent and scraped the wires as he pulled them in, and when you get any moisture, they get harder for DSL to talk over.

    Past that it could be them but unlikely anything will be looked at unless they receive more than 1.
    Then again, larger companies use mixed electronics and it takes the right technician at the right time to catch the issue.

    Again, I always question TP link in reliability. Their routers drop out a lot due to their apparent inability to write good firmware for their lower end gear. I was unaware they were even competing in the DSL category. A lot of their marketing is still in broken English nonsense lol!
  9. Quote:
    If you want them to do a truckroll, and actually find anything, get creative and say "yeah i was outside the other day and saw a mouse go under in your thing outside, would that have anything to do with it?" If we believe there is a mouse inside our pedestal, we will really want to come check it out. They just wreck everything in there.

    If they do a truck roll, and there's no fault found or the fault is inside your property, they charge you for the truck roll. Which is quite a bit.

    Because Chorus (who owns the lines and DSLAMs) and Spark (who you sign up with) are separate, Chorus will not simply roll a truck because someone at Spark says 'someone saw a mouse'.

    One thing to try is getting a pile of gel-filled connectors (any electrical or hardware store should have them) and connecting your router directly to the incoming line at the ETP - this should be a white box somewhere around the edge of your house. If you have overhead cabling, it'll be where it enters the house. If there's no problem there, your issues are inside your property.
  10. Niskii said:

    I simply don't understand how if I've replaced everything that there's no issues on the ISPs side.


    You tried to fix everything before first collecting facts - identifying the defect. Your manufacturer says how to do that with detailed examples. Long before even suspecting anything, first numbers must be obtained. Especially a Signal to Noise ratio. As explained in
    http://www.tp-link.us/faq-546.html
  11. westom said:
    Niskii said:

    I simply don't understand how if I've replaced everything that there's no issues on the ISPs side.


    You tried to fix everything before first collecting facts - identifying the defect. Your manufacturer says how to do that with detailed examples. Long before even suspecting anything, first numbers must be obtained. Especially a Signal to Noise ratio. As explained in
    http://www.tp-link.us/faq-546.html




    I have though, I've looked for line noise, considered it to be "bad" power and also updated all firmware. If you replace everything + find a negative on those two things, it's hard to figured out what else it could be.
  12. Poor joints elsewhere in your house is very very common. The test I posted earlier about connecting your modem directly to the ETP will check if it's that.
  13. Niskii said:
    I have though, I've looked for line noise, considered it to be "bad" power and also updated all firmware. If you replace everything + find a negative on those two things, it's hard to figured out what else it could be.

    You replaced everything - creating confusion. Good parts can appear bad in some venues. And bad parts can appear good in others. Swapping only works when something is 100% defective. Your symptoms come and go - are not 100% always good or bad. So swapping often creates confusion and deception.

    Posted was an example of what must first be known - numbers. In that example, SNR and other relevant numbers were provided in dBs. Without numbers, others who better know this stuff cannot provide assistance.

    What would power boxes and cables do? If cables were defective today and causing problems, then those cables were defective last month, also creating bad SNR numbers, but working fine. Just because something works does not mean it is OK. Useful solutions start with collecting facts - especially numbers. Making changes is much later.

    TelcoAmericana listed other facts that must be known before changing anything. For example, did you trace a phone wire back to the service entrance noting every filter, other wire connections, and even what that cable is adjacent to? Inspect - not change. And reported here. Is any noise heard on a POTS phone (that uses same phone line)? But then all that is summarized by what must be obtained first: Signal to Noise Ratio number.

    You have an intermittent. That means a defect exists both when a modem is working and when it is not working. And sometimes the defect does not exist. Only an SNR number reports when the defect does and does not exist. A good and bad DSL connection is only a symptom. You need actual numbers to see a defect - not symptoms.

    Without hard facts (numbers), then swapping, changing and posted recommendations can only create speculation. Review the example: http://www.tp-link.us/faq-546.html Your modem will provide equivalent numbers. Numbers must be posted here. Then recommendations are based in facts - not speculation about 'bad' power, noise, and (what clearly is totally irrelevant) firmware updates.

    Stop making changes. Start collecting facts. Changing things provide no facts, exponentially complicates matters, and creates confusion. In all diagnostic work (electronics, cars, aerospace, chemistry, medicine), first all facts are collected without making any changes - without swapping anything.

    What are SNR numbers both when a modem is working and not connected?
  14. Also, you haven't answered whether it happens at the same time every day, and when that is. It tends to be something of a smoking gun.
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