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How do I test my CPU temp under load?

So I have an i7 4770 running in my PC. its got a normal cooler. The issue that im having is that my CPU goes like 5-8 degrees above the maximum allowance (according to CPUWorld) under load. So how do I test my CPU temps under load in the bios? (to remove any software edits or bugs)

And should I just straight up buy a new cooler?
(if so which one is a good one, im looking at the Hyper 212 evo)
13 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about test cpu temp load
  1. What is the exact temp? If it is below 80 degrees under full load, don't worry about it. If it's 80 degrees on idle, then u got a problem.
  2. The stock cooler is fine for an i5, but marginal for an i7.

    A Hyper 212 should do the job fine... But it provides less cooling for the motherboard than the stock cooler

    Does your motherboard have a heatsink on the VRMs? (Google it if you don't know what I mean)
  3. I would download AIDA64 and test it under full load. If you are still getting the higher temps then it may be a good time to look into an aftermarket cooler. I would recommend the Noctua NH-D14 for air or the Corsair h100i gtx for water cooling. That processor has a lot of overclocking potential if cooled properly.
  4. katalyst12 said:
    I would download AIDA64 and test it under full load. If you are still getting the higher temps then it may be a good time to look into an aftermarket cooler. I would recommend the Noctua NH-D14 for air or the Corsair h100i gtx for water cooling. That processor has a lot of overclocking potential if cooled properly.


    Are you sure the OP has a 4770k?
  5. lodders said:
    katalyst12 said:
    I would download AIDA64 and test it under full load. If you are still getting the higher temps then it may be a good time to look into an aftermarket cooler. I would recommend the Noctua NH-D14 for air or the Corsair h100i gtx for water cooling. That processor has a lot of overclocking potential if cooled properly.


    Are you sure the OP has a 4770k?


    Nope. lol. I jumped to conclusions. Do you have a 4770 or 4770k? Either way testing it with AIDA64 will give you your temp limit and let you know if you need aftermarket cooling.
  6. Forever Oleg said:
    What is the exact temp? If it is below 80 degrees under full load, don't worry about it. If it's 80 degrees on idle, then u got a problem.


    IL definitely use AIDA64, but sadly my pc isnt water cooled D:

    Its just a 4770, no K,
  7. Forever Oleg said:
    What is the exact temp? If it is below 80 degrees under full load, don't worry about it. If it's 80 degrees on idle, then u got a problem.


    Its around 50-60 on idle, but playing CS:GO (Probabbly not full load) Its around 78 degrees Celcius. The highest exact temp is 79
  8. Best answer
    SqugSCX said:
    Forever Oleg said:
    What is the exact temp? If it is below 80 degrees under full load, don't worry about it. If it's 80 degrees on idle, then u got a problem.


    Its around 50-60 on idle, but playing CS:GO (Probabbly not full load) Its around 78 degrees Celcius. The highest exact temp is 79


    That is on the high side for load temps but acceptable. If you do find yourself going over 80 when testing then I would consider another cooler. If not then you are all good.
  9. lodders said:
    The stock cooler is fine for an i5, but marginal for an i7.

    A Hyper 212 should do the job fine... But it provides less cooling for the motherboard than the stock cooler

    Does your motherboard have a heatsink on the VRMs? (Google it if you don't know what I mean)


    It appears that it does have heatsinks on those bits.
  10. katalyst12 said:
    SqugSCX said:
    Forever Oleg said:
    What is the exact temp? If it is below 80 degrees under full load, don't worry about it. If it's 80 degrees on idle, then u got a problem.


    Its around 50-60 on idle, but playing CS:GO (Probabbly not full load) Its around 78 degrees Celcius. The highest exact temp is 79


    That is on the high side for load temps but acceptable. If you do find yourself going over 80 when testing then I would consider another cooler. If not then you are all good.


    Ok great, thanks, should I look into my temps during say Firestrike for example? or using a CPU load program?
  11. SqugSCX said:
    katalyst12 said:
    SqugSCX said:
    Forever Oleg said:
    What is the exact temp? If it is below 80 degrees under full load, don't worry about it. If it's 80 degrees on idle, then u got a problem.


    Its around 50-60 on idle, but playing CS:GO (Probabbly not full load) Its around 78 degrees Celcius. The highest exact temp is 79


    That is on the high side for load temps but acceptable. If you do find yourself going over 80 when testing then I would consider another cooler. If not then you are all good.



    Ok great, thanks, should I look into my temps during say Firestrike for example? or using a CPU load program?



    I would use AIDA64 to test the processor and the whole system for that matter. You can download this for free. It is also a recommended stress test for Haswell processors.

    Firestrike is a great program for benchmarking graphics cards, but won't help you with testing the processor
  12. SqugSCX said:
    lodders said:
    The stock cooler is fine for an i5, but marginal for an i7.

    A Hyper 212 should do the job fine... But it provides less cooling for the motherboard than the stock cooler

    Does your motherboard have a heatsink on the VRMs? (Google it if you don't know what I mean)


    It appears that it does have heatsinks on those bits.


    Good news all round then.
    On the one hand, your CPU is not quite overheating, so your existing cooler is OK, (although only just)
    On the other hand, your motherboard has a VRM heatsink, which means that you can use a different cooler like the Hyper 212 or similar without any danger of overheating the power supply section of your motherboard.
    A better cooler will also make your computer run quieter, which will be a nice bonus.

    (I wouldn't bother with a really expensive cooler - it would give you no extra benefit over something like a 212)
  13. lodders said:
    SqugSCX said:
    lodders said:
    The stock cooler is fine for an i5, but marginal for an i7.

    A Hyper 212 should do the job fine... But it provides less cooling for the motherboard than the stock cooler

    Does your motherboard have a heatsink on the VRMs? (Google it if you don't know what I mean)


    It appears that it does have heatsinks on those bits.


    Good news all round then.
    On the one hand, your CPU is not quite overheating, so your existing cooler is OK, (although only just)
    On the other hand, your motherboard has a VRM heatsink, which means that you can use a different cooler like the Hyper 212 or similar without any danger of overheating the power supply section of your motherboard.
    A better cooler will also make your computer run quieter, which will be a nice bonus.

    (I wouldn't bother with a really expensive cooler - it would give you no extra benefit over something like a 212)


    Ok, thanks for the response. IL probably be getting the Hyper 212, nothing super expensive
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