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Can a bad HDD slow down my whole PC even my good HDD?

I've got 2 HDD's, a failing 500GB Seagate and a good 1TB Seagate. Can my failing HDD be causing my PC to slow down? How?
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  1. yes. because the os will try to access it.
  2. rgd1101 said:
    yes. because the os will try to access it.


    But what if my OS is on my good 1TB disk?
  3. If it's a pure data drive, I guess only if you are accessing the data.
  4. Hey there, Rafael!

    Unfortunately, just like @rgd1101 mentioned, it's not uncommon for a non-system drive to affect the performance of your PC like this. I'd strongly advise you to attempt to plug the HDD externally via SATA-to-USB cable (+ an adapter) or a docking station. This will allow you to, hopefully, access your data and back it up before it completely fails. Besides, it will allow your system to boot properly without the drive interfering with the boot-up process.

    I'd also recommend you to check the health and SMART data of the drive using its brand-specific diagnostic tool from the manufacturer's website. If it still affects the system poorly, you should create a bootable flash drive with the DOS version of that HDD testing utility and check up on the drive without booting into Windows.

    Keep us posted & Good luck!
    SuperSoph_WD
  5. SuperSoph_WD said:
    Hey there, Rafael!

    Unfortunately, just like @rgd1101 mentioned, it's not uncommon for a non-system drive to affect the performance of your PC like this. I'd strongly advise you to attempt to plug the HDD externally via SATA-to-USB cable (+ an adapter) or a docking station. This will allow you to, hopefully, access your data and back it up before it completely fails. Besides, it will allow your system to boot properly without the drive interfering with the boot-up process.

    I'd also recommend you to check the health and SMART data of the drive using its brand-specific diagnostic tool from the manufacturer's website. If it still affects the system poorly, you should create a bootable flash drive with the DOS version of that HDD testing utility and check up on the drive without booting into Windows.

    Keep us posted & Good luck!
    SuperSoph_WD


    Ok, I've tested the failing HDD for the 10th time and it says the same: Reallocated sectors count 1. Here's the Crystal Disk Info Image link:

    https://beta.postimg.org/image/po3zrak6b/
  6. Best answer
    Rafael Mestdag said:
    Ok, I've tested the failing HDD for the 10th time and it says the same: Reallocated sectors count 1. Here's the Crystal Disk Info Image link:

    https://beta.postimg.org/image/po3zrak6b/

    You should definitely get that HDD out of your system. Unfortunate, Rafael, It seems like the HDD has failed due to the enormous amount of bad sectors. The raw value normally represents a count of the bad sectors that have been found and remapped. Thus, the higher the attribute value, the more sectors the drive has had to reallocate. The Current, Worst and Threshold figures are "normalized" values that can be thought of as health percentages. If a drive has no bad sectors, then it gets a score of 100. As defects begin to develop, then the health score falls.

    I believe there's nothing you can do about that HDD. If you have important data on it, I'd strongly recommend you to contact a professional data recovery company for assistance. The damage is too severe for you to fix by yourself or even retrieve any uncorrupted data.

    In the future, make sure you have at least two copies of your data stored in different storage locations (on-site & off-site). This is the surest way to avoid similar data loss headaches! :(

    Best of luck!
    SuperSoph_WD
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