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System Won't POST, help!

Hello,
I just built my first PC two weeks ago, and wanted to upgrade a few parts. I just got an AIO water cooler and two more sticks of ram. I realized that I bought the wrong model of ram (timings and latency were different, I believe) so I just put the original ram back in and installed the water cooler. Now, the system will boot but won't post to the BIOS. I was able to get it to the BIOS a couple times by putting a single stick of ram in the slot closest to the CPU, but when I hit "save and exit" I was returned to a blank screen and the DRAM Led (MemOk!, I have an Asus mobo) was flashing. I've tried all the different sticks of ram and still can't get it to post. Any tips?
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More about system post
  1. Since you just installed a water cooler I would remove it and the processor look for bent pins if none are found reinstall everything.
  2. Zerk2012 said:
    Since you just installed a water cooler I would remove it and the processor look for bent pins if none are found reinstall everything.


    Just checked, is it normal for all of the pins to be at an angle? The don't look bent but aren't straight up. I also just put the system back together outside the case and it worked and went to Windows? What could have been wrong with it?
  3. probably just a loose connection or something needed to be reseated.
  4. It is NOT normal for the CPU pins to be anything other than perpendicular to the plane of the CPU package, i.e., sticking straight up (or down, depending upon how you are holding it.) When you inserted the CPU into the socket, did it require any force? If so, you have a problem. When properly inserting a CPU into the socket, it should drop into place on its own, no force required. Needing force means something is wrong (retention level in wrong position, one or more CPU pins bent, etc.) If you have bent pins, you can attempt to straighten them with proper tools, using anti-ESD procedures. If a pin breaks off, well . . . so sorry.
  5. Best answer
    If your system worked when outside of the case, check for a shorted mounting post. You may need to put insulating washers in place.
  6. altazi said:
    It is NOT normal for the CPU pins to be anything other than perpendicular to the plane of the CPU package, i.e., sticking straight up (or down, depending upon how you are holding it.) When you inserted the CPU into the socket, did it require any force? If so, you have a problem. When properly inserting a CPU into the socket, it should drop into place on its own, no force required. Needing force means something is wrong (retention level in wrong position, one or more CPU pins bent, etc.) If you have bent pins, you can attempt to straighten them with proper tools, using anti-ESD procedures. If a pin breaks off, well . . . so sorry.


    Intel pins are on the motherboard and are not standing straight up.
  7. Zerk2012 said:
    altazi said:
    It is NOT normal for the CPU pins to be anything other than perpendicular to the plane of the CPU package, i.e., sticking straight up (or down, depending upon how you are holding it.) When you inserted the CPU into the socket, did it require any force? If so, you have a problem. When properly inserting a CPU into the socket, it should drop into place on its own, no force required. Needing force means something is wrong (retention level in wrong position, one or more CPU pins bent, etc.) If you have bent pins, you can attempt to straighten them with proper tools, using anti-ESD procedures. If a pin breaks off, well . . . so sorry.


    Intel pins are on the motherboard and are not standing straight up.


    Of course you are correct, I don't believe the OP mentioned the CPU brand, but used the term 'pins', so I assumed . . . In this case, they aren't really 'pins' so much as they are 'spring contacts'.
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