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Need Advice on PC Gaming Build: $1000-1500 Canadian est. Budget

Approximate Purchase Date: Aiming to purchase parts within the next month or so if possible.

Budget Range: $1000-$1500 canadian, After Shipping

System Usage from Most to Least Important: Gaming, possible focus on Recording Gameplay etc.

Are you buying a monitor: No

Do you need to buy OS: Yes

Preferred Website(s) for Parts: Newegg.ca or other Websites available for Canada.

Location: Canada

Parts Preferences: Mainly prefer Intel CPU's along with Nvida although am willing to use other reliable parts/manufacturers for the right price.

Overclocking: Not planning on Overclocking, may try in the future if needed.

SLI or Crossfire: Maybe if needed, currently only planning on using a Single monitor or possibly a 36inch T.V for possible Gaming/Shows. Will consider if is a better price/performance comparison to single card.

Your Monitor Resolution: I believe my current monitor is a 1600x1200 although I would be willing to buy a new/better one depending on how well the PC build works out.

Additional Comments: The purpose of building this computer is to have a gaming PC capable of running any of the newest games on the highest settings possible for my budget. My second concern is the long term reliability of the hardware, no over heating/Breaking down etc., along with Future proofing. Noise reduction is also a plus, other then that - No fancy lighting effects/sparkles are needed.

Example of Games I wish to play: ARMA 3 / Space Engineers / Skyrim(fully graphic modded etc) / Any new release that I can get my hands on, I have been patiently waiting to build an awesome PC, instead of my potato laptop, in order to play all the awesome new games that are coming out.

PS: How do you feel about VR Support/Use (Vive/Oculus/Other) with the build, although VR isn't my main focus with this new build.

-Thank you very much in advance for any suggestions or help with this new build, I have been waiting for years, watching patiently as new technology and games have come out, now I finally am in the position were I think Im ready to build the best gaming rig "we" can :)
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More about advice gaming build 1000 1500 canadian est budget
  1. May I be permitted in going $2.75 over budget? :)

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i7-6700 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($387.98 @ DirectCanada)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H170M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($104.99 @ NCIX)
    Memory: G.Skill NT Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2133 Memory ($67.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Storage: A-Data Premier SP550 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($69.98 @ DirectCanada)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Canada Computers)
    Video Card: Zotac GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Founders Edition Video Card ($574.50 @ Vuugo)
    Case: Corsair 100R ATX Mid Tower Case ($57.36 @ DirectCanada)
    Power Supply: EVGA 600B 600W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($64.99 @ Amazon Canada)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($114.98 @ DirectCanada)
    Total: $1502.75
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-06-29 10:29 EDT-0400

    Okay, so since you are doing streaming, editing, Arma 3, and other processor intensive activities I went ahead with an i7 build. But in order to fit it in the budget I cut out a lot of other areas. The power supply is probably the biggest cut as the 600B isn't as good as a Tier 2 I would have preferred to give you. But besides a few drawbacks it is a decent enough power supply for a non-overclocking build (I use one on my personal rig and it is stable enough to OC my R9 280 25%).
  2. timeconsumer said:
    May I be permitted in going $2.75 over budget? :)

    Okay, so since you are doing streaming, editing, Arma 3, and other processor intensive activities I went ahead with an i7 build. But in order to fit it in the budget I cut out a lot of other areas. The power supply is probably the biggest cut as the 600B isn't as good as a Tier 2 I would have preferred to give you. But besides a few drawbacks it is a decent enough power supply for a non-overclocking build (I use one on my personal rig and it is stable enough to OC my R9 280 25%).


    I can work with a little over budget if needed, especially for future proofing :p and thank you for responding! ^_^

    Hmm, So would this build require additional cooling or is the stock/default that is/isn't included enough for it, such as thermal paste etc?

    Also would this build be easily upgradable in the future if I had additional funds? - such as having enough room to add more ram/cards/ or anything else (sorry I'm a new at building rigs).

    Further on that point, would it be possible to get the extra space needed for some of the other parts you would recommend if I increased the budget by... lets say $100 more etc?
  3. 1)Default cooling is perfectly fine.
    2)There are 2 more empty Ram slots, but if you wanted to upgrade the GPU you'd need to buy a whole new one as it doesn't support SLI (nor can the PSU). But honestly I think spending money now to possibly SLI in the future is a waste.
    3)With $50-$100 extra we could get a little more breathing room to afford a slightly better mobo, case, power supply, and maybe one or two other things.
  4. Well, considering it would already be a substantial amount of money, I could raise the budget to $1600 if it would make a decent improvement to performance/ future proofing.
    I intend to make the most of this build for years to come, thats why having enough space for upgrading etc would be nice, and also not having to worry about upgrading for a long time.
    By the way I have an old(Windows Xp/AMD 64 Processor 3500+) computer or two laying around that might have possible parts we could use? The newest thing in the one is a Nvidia graphics card, fairly older version, need to find the name of it.. Might be a nvidia geforce 9500..?
  5. Best answer
    Well, it won't change much in the way of performance and future proofing. But there are some definite benefits.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i7-6700 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($387.98 @ DirectCanada)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-H170-D3HP ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($132.81 @ Amazon Canada)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($75.98 @ Newegg Canada)
    Storage: A-Data Premier SP550 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($69.98 @ DirectCanada)
    Storage: Western Digital Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.55 @ Vuugo)
    Video Card: EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC Gaming ACX 3.0 Video Card ($589.99 @ Memory Express)
    Case: Corsair 200R ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ Canada Computers)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA GS 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($94.98 @ DirectCanada)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($114.98 @ DirectCanada)
    Total: $1591.24
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2016-06-29 11:49 EDT-0400

    -A better motherboard is always nice: fewer headaches for the install, more fan headers, well-rated and reviewed, etc. In my opinion spending a little more on a motherboard is never a bad idea, if you can afford it.
    Better ram: a little faster, only a couple of dollars more. Worth the minor price increase.
    Non-reference GPU: Quieter! Worth it.
    (slightly) Better case: Comes with an extra fan, some dust filters, USB headers, etc. Still a pretty simple case though. Could go either way, a big upgrade would probably be the S340 for another $20 above this one. Quiet, easier install, cleaner cable routing, etc.
    Better PSU: Long term-reliability and stability, good warranty. Another place where it never hurts to spend extra cash if you can. The 600B is perfectly fine for a budget build but this one is one of their best.

    I also want to make sure I am understanding your concept of future-proofing and "space for upgrading", what is it exactly you are looking for?
    The only old part of yours we may be able to reuse is the optical drive, if you even want/need one.
  6. Well your selling me on the increased price so far,
    An optical drive might be nice to slot in since I have a fair amount of old cd games like age of mythology/cod 4 I enjoy playing, although I probably wont play them much once I have a build like this :p

    What I mean by future proofing would be, having the ability to play games that come out in 2017/18/19 etc. without having to upgrade the computer further.
    As for "space for upgrading", I mean if I would like to add more memory or have enough room for upgrading graphics cards in the future/ enough slots and space etc.
    From what I have read about the case, it seems to be a fairly large one to work in,

    Also if I were to want a WiFi Card/other, would there be room for that?
    From what I understand, an ethernet cable would need to plug directly into the back of the case/into the motherboard in order to get internet without installing a card etc?
  7. 1) If you want to reuse your optical drive, don't get the S340 case, the 200R will work though.
    2) You will definitely be able to game for many years with an i7+1070 combo. It is a very nice machine. Now, if you go and buy a 4k monitor and want to game in 4k, you'll need to upgrade. But that's the way it goes. And as games improve over the years you'll slowly fall more and more behind in graphics ability until you decide it's time to replace the 1070 with the 1370 or whatever they have, it's the nature of the beast. I buy $200(ish) GPUs and replace them every 3 years, it works for me. You'll have room enough to fit big cards and 4 sticks of ram.
    3) You can fit a wifi card if you want. They cost about $20-$60 depending on what you need (b/g/n/ac etc). But for gaming online I highly recommend going over ethernet if possible rather than wireless. Yes, it would plug directly into the motherboard's ethernet jack.
  8. I want to buy it all but i'm scared i'm going to screw it up hahah, Im also stingy so spending this much on something like a computer is going to give me a heart attack when I do it xD
    For example, When installing the parts, I'm worried I will fry the motherboard with static or something
  9. It's possible to screw it up. But then you put it back in the box and send it back to Newegg and say "It didn't work." Once I bent the CPU pins in a mobo and sent it back, I told them it came to me like that. Had a new mobo the next week. As far as static just assemble it on a desk and not on the carpet, touch the metal case every so often to discharge any static if you have any.

    Beginner mistakes to avoid:
    1) Don't forget to install the motherboard standoff screws.
    2) Remove any protective coverings (pin protectors, films, etc)
    3) Check for fit before you start putting everything together. Determine if the CPU cooler is going to be annoying if you wait to install it after the motherboard is inside the case already.
    4) Make sure the parts align (memory pin spacing, CPU corner arrow, etc)
    5) Take your time with the cable organization.
    6) Read the mobo manual carefully to ensure you get the header pins installed right, take your time.
    7) Don't cross thread any screws
    8) I think that's it.
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