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why do people overclock their cpu?

i see a lote of benchmarks(games) when it comes to overclocked cpu and non overclocked like the i5 6600 stock vs i5 6600k @4.6Ghz there are no to little difference and for the price you pay for overclocking it isn't worth that ~5 fps difference. so yhea can someone explain why there a lote of people overclocking...
and if you are overclocking for example the i5 6600k why don't go instead for the i7 6700 ??? you pay almost the same(aftermarket cooler+Z170 chipset mobo)
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about people overclock cpu
  1. 1) To reduce/eliminate bottlenecking
    2) To achieve higher performance (It's not because it's worth it, it's because they can pay more and (sometimes) don't care about price/performance)
    3) For bragging rights (Ever heard of Overclocking Record?)
  2. It can help bring the minimum framerate up/alleviate some stutters, but really it's pretty minimal.

    However in 2 or 3 years if you still have that same CPU, the modern games of that time might be more demanding, so it's good to have the option of improving your performance from overclocking.

    Regardless, it's more of an enthusiast/hobby thing. Just for benchmarks. Plus, it's so damn easy now there's kind of a "why not?" attitude.
  3. 1- For games at least, the i5-6600k overclocked will probably be better than the i7-6700 (not overclocked).

    2- Many times, the cooler doesn't need to be included in the cost equation. Many people already have a good cooler from previous builds, or they would buy one anyways, even if they wouldn't overclock, just for better temperatures and less noise.

    3- Not very common, but some people would choose Z170 even if they wouldn't overclock, just because of the added features and SLI.

    4- If you already have an i7-6700 and you want to upgrade to something faster without OC, then what would you buy? There's nothing faster, so the only option left would be to get the i7-6700k and overclock it.
    4- Probably the most important one, that applies to a lot of the overclockers. I enjoy gaming. But I also enjoy (probably even more, as a short term thing) building my PC. And overclocking is a way to build your PC, and test it, and push it, and tune it. I overclock because I want more performance, but I mostly overclock to see how far my chip goes, and to enjoy overclocking itself. And since I don't intend to upgrade my platform for 3-5 years at least, that added 10-15% cpu speed will help me get a more enjoyable experience in a few years.
  4. IDProG said:
    1) To reduce/eliminate bottlenecking
    2) To achieve higher performance (It's not because it's worth it, it's because they can pay more and (sometimes) don't care about price/performance)
    3) For bragging rights (Ever heard of Overclocking Record?)



    1) by ~5 fps average>> reduce/eliminate bottleneck okay totally worth it -,-
    2) why not get the i7 6700 instead of a overclocked i5 6600k @ 4.6Ghz -,- in gaming the i7 6700 even beat in some games the overclocked i5 6600k and in video editing and rendering the i7 6700 is also the winner
    3) the people who do overclocking records are mostly testers and reviewers...
  5. It can help bring the minimum framerate up/alleviate some stutters, but really it's pretty minimal.

    However in 2 or 3 years if you still have that same CPU, the modern games of that time might be more demanding, so it's good to have the option of improving your performance from overclocking.

    Regardless, it's more of an enthusiast/hobby thing. Just for benchmarks. Plus, it's so damn easy now there's kind of a "why not?" attitude.


    i think this is the best reason for overclocking : Regardless, it's more of an enthusiast/hobby thing. Just for benchmarks. Plus, it's so damn easy now there's kind of a "why not?" attitude
  6. anbello262 said:
    1- For games at least, the i5-6600k overclocked will probably be better than the i7-6700 (not overclocked).

    2- Many times, the cooler doesn't need to be included in the cost equation. Many people already have a good cooler from previous builds, or they would buy one anyways, even if they wouldn't overclock, just for better temperatures and less noise.

    3- Not very common, but some people would choose Z170 even if they wouldn't overclock, just because of the added features and SLI.

    4- If you already have an i7-6700 and you want to upgrade to something faster without OC, then what would you buy? There's nothing faster, so the only option left would be to get the i7-6700k and overclock it.
    4- Probably the most important one, that applies to a lot of the overclockers. I enjoy gaming. But I also enjoy (probably even more, as a short term thing) building my PC. And overclocking is a way to build your PC, and test it, and push it, and tune it. I overclock because I want more performance, but I mostly overclock to see how far my chip goes, and to enjoy overclocking itself. And since I don't intend to upgrade my platform for 3-5 years at least, that added 10-15% cpu speed will help me get a more enjoyable experience in a few years.


    1) still for gaming the i7 6700 is better: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UToRoFzvA5c

    2) we aren't talking about upgrading a pc rig.

    3) you got go with H170 is cheaper same as the Z170 but can't overclock

    4) well if there isn't faster cpu atm then there isn't -,- you could spend another $400 + $80 to get the k version of the i7 6700
    and overlock it and get dissapointed by the results, but the only guys who would do that are rich boys...

    5) if you want to be cool and make it look awesome then yhea get the i5 6600k.
    but if you want a future proof then get the i7 6700... (for the same price you pay for the i5 6600k)
  7. Best answer
    The majority of overclockers, myself included, do it because we're enthusiasts. We like to tinker with our rigs.

    From a gaming perspective, overclocking is only useful if the CPU is bottlenecking the GPU. For example, an overclocked i5-2500K paired with a GTX 1080 shows noticeable improvements when compared to a 2500K at stock speed. A modern i5-6500 doesn't have this problem.

    Overclocking does help to educate people on their CPUs. You gain an understanding of how power is linked to heat and how heat needs to be controlled. Another good reason to overclock is the performance boost gained in other programs, such as Photoshop.
  8. You're looking at 5 fps wrong as well... 5 fps in lol going from 250 to 255 means squat, 5 fps going from 40 to 45 or something at 4k is huge
  9. Supahos said:
    You're looking at 5 fps wrong as well... 5 fps in lol going from 250 to 255 means squat, 5 fps going from 40 to 45 or something at 4k is huge


    well if you look at that you are right, but the majority of people don't game at 4k it isn't affordable!
    but yhea anyways you are right in 4k gaming every frame counts
  10. Desproyer:

    Overclocking is not meant to be price/performance competitive.
    One of the scenarios I proposed was misunderstood, when I compared the i7 6700 vs the i7 6700k.
    I meant this situation:
    I have a powerful rig. I want to do both gaming, drawing and video editing. Lets say that for my PC I paid around 1000 without CPU+MOBO.
    Now, I just have to choose the platform. I will clearly need an i7.
    Should I go with the 6700 or the 6700k?
    Given the price difference between the 2, when compared to the whole system price, the 6700k is probably worse in performance/price, but it is cleary better in pure performance.
    And, since I have the money, I will go with the k version.

    Now, the "comparison" you provided was with both K versions. There wasn't any 6700, it was the 6700k.

    Also, H170 doesn't let you SLI.

    I never said anything about "looking good" or "being cool", you're just twisting my words there. I said that, as most overclockers, I enjoy the process of overclocking. The same way you enjoy gaming and are willing to pay $40 for a good game, I enjoy overclocking and I am willing to pay the cost associated with it.

    And also, if you know how to choose your components, getting an i5-6600k+Z170 is cheaper than getting an i7-6700+H170, while being better in many games.


    You're looking at it the wrong way.
    It makes no sense to compare the value, the performance/price. That's just wrong.
    If you care about value, then just get the non OC version, everybody would agree that OCing is not a value oriented decision.
    It is performance oriented, and tinkerer oriented. It IS more expensive, nobody would argue that.


    Oh, and about 4k: It makes even LESS sense to overclock the cpu. Any high i5 is more than enough to power a 4k rig, as the bottleneck is ALWAYS the gpu. Overclock your i7 6700k, and compare it to an i5-3570, and you will most likely get the exact same framerate, because you are limited by your gpu.
  11. anbello262 said:
    Desproyer:

    Overclocking is not meant to be price/performance competitive.
    One of the scenarios I proposed was misunderstood, when I compared the i7 6700 vs the i7 6700k.
    I meant this situation:
    I have a powerful rig. I want to do both gaming, drawing and video editing. Lets say that for my PC I paid around 1000 without CPU+MOBO.
    Now, I just have to choose the platform. I will clearly need an i7.
    Should I go with the 6700 or the 6700k?
    Given the price difference between the 2, when compared to the whole system price, the 6700k is probably worse in performance/price, but it is cleary better in pure performance.
    And, since I have the money, I will go with the k version.

    Now, the "comparison" you provided was with both K versions. There wasn't any 6700, it was the 6700k.

    Also, H170 doesn't let you SLI.

    I never said anything about "looking good" or "being cool", you're just twisting my words there. I said that, as most overclockers, I enjoy the process of overclocking. The same way you enjoy gaming and are willing to pay $40 for a good game, I enjoy overclocking and I am willing to pay the cost associated with it.

    And also, if you know how to choose your components, getting an i5-6600k+Z170 is cheaper than getting an i7-6700+H170, while being better in many games.


    You're looking at it the wrong way.
    It makes no sense to compare the value, the performance/price. That's just wrong.
    If you care about value, then just get the non OC version, everybody would agree that OCing is not a value oriented decision.
    It is performance oriented, and tinkerer oriented. It IS more expensive, nobody would argue that.


    Oh, and about 4k: It makes even LESS sense to overclock the cpu. Any high i5 is more than enough to power a 4k rig, as the bottleneck is ALWAYS the gpu. Overclock your i7 6700k, and compare it to an i5-3570, and you will most likely get the exact same framerate, because you are limited by your gpu.


    Now, the "comparison" you provided was with both K versions. There wasn't any 6700, it was the 6700k.
    = still there shouldn't be any dramastic difference between 6700 vs 6700k

    Also, H170 doesn't let you SLI. = yes you are right, my bad

    I never said anything about "looking good" or "being cool", you're just twisting my words there
    = i never said it was your words...

    You're looking at it the wrong way.
    It makes no sense to compare the value, the performance/price. That's just wrong.
    If you care about value, then just get the non OC version, everybody would agree that OCing is not a value oriented decision.
    It is performance oriented, and tinkerer oriented. It IS more expensive, nobody would argue that.
    = yes you get better performance, but don't expect the next level performance.
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