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I need a 220-240V ac to 12v dc power supply

I have this led strip but it doesn't come with a power supply http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/5050-RGB-5M-300-LEDS-SMD-LED-Strip-Light-12V-Waterproof-24-KEY-IR-Controller/281788230095.
I don't know what power supply I need and I'm looking for one under $20 AUD. Thanks.
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More about 220 240v 12v power supply
  1. How about this https://hobbyking.com/en_us/12v-3a-interchangeable-plug-adapter.html

    I use Hobbyking loads in the UK and they have an AUS warehouse too
  2. I just want to point out you may want a decently powerful power supply depending on the colors you will use.

    They list 14.4 watts per meter(all 3 colors full blast). Any single color will use less and most combinations should not require full power.

    In theory for 5 meters of this stuff you need 72 watts(and maybe a bit more for the controller it self.). This would be 6 amps @ 12 volts. This is not to say you can not use less, but for full colors you will want at least that much power.
  3. Just some looking around and I found a universal style laptop charger which puts out 90w @ 12v, has multiple barrel style adapter tips, and accepts 120-240v input power. Do a search for 'zozo 90w' on eBay or Amazon and you should be able to find one. It lists at about $30 USD, so convert to your local currency to get the price for your locale.
  4. Best answer
    The A in the 1A, 2A etc means the current (AMPS) it can provide. There are a few things with power, namely V (volts), A (Amps), and W (watts, also sometimes expressed as P (power)). The formula which relates this is P (or W)= V*A. Watts = Volts x Amps. That's how much current can be provided and how much work can be done at that particular voltage.

    Volts is electrical potential. Amperage is current flow. You can have 10,000 volts at .0002 amps and it won't hurt you one bit. It'll tickle you and could also put on a pretty electrical show. But 120v @ 1A could kill you.

    So - 5v @ 1A = 5 watts. 5v @ 2A = 10 watts. This allows you to calculate what kind of PSU you will need based on power draw.

    IE: you have a RX-480 which has a 160 watt power envelope. Your PSU might list things as Amps (ie: your lead you connect to the GPU is on line which can provide 20A). Since that lead is a 12v lead, and provides 20A, 12v x 20A = 240 watts, which means it can easily power the RX-480.

    In this case - the listing you provided - they have several models of transformers. You need to pick the one with the Amperage you'll be needing. In other words, your MAX draw, everything on, is 72W. That means you'd have to pick at least a 6A transformer (12v x 6A = 72W which is your max draw on the strip you have...). This doesn't mean you can't pick a higher AMP unit, that is just the max that the transformer in question can supply at 100% load. You can always pick a higher rated unit, just try not to use a lower rated unit as you could suffer from transformer failure down the road.
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