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Impossible problem. Pulled RAM out, reinserted and system won't POST.

Hi,

I had a problem with my main pc that turned out to be a bad graphics driver but it would not POST. In the process of testing why, I pulled a working 4GB DDR3 stick out of my son's PC, but this problem was not RAM-related.

When my son re-inserted the RAM -- no POST, fast continuous beep. It's UEFI BIOS and Gigabyte GA-AM1M mobo.

I have tried

*changing slots
*using another known good RAM in there
*reseating PSU connections
* reseating video card

all result in continuous fast beeps.

It is a bit of a mystery as to what the continuous fast beep means on this mobo, but one of the possibilities I have seen is "reseat RAM" which is the most sensible one, because the last thing we did before breaking it was remove, and then reseat the RAM.

If I bent a pin, don't you think the other slot would still work?

I could try to reseat the CPU and all that jazz but it seems like the most likely issue is the RAM not connecting. What woul you do?

Thanks in advance let me know if you want more info.
5 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about impossible problem pulled ram reinserted system post
  1. First and foremost, the POST happens long before Windows, and thus, any drivers load, so a bad driver will not affect POST. A computer can POST without a harddrive and any Windows or drivers at all.

    RAM slot pins don't reall bend, they are in a socket with each pin held in place by plastic and RAM chips odn't have pins to get bent or damaged. CPU could have got knocked, moving pins and unseating it, or if there is a GPU, same thing. If there is a GPU it has onboard graphics, then remove the graphics card and try the built on.

    That or remove everything and start over, noting that if you remove the CPU heatsink, you'll probably need new thermal paste to put it back together.
  2. Do you know what company manufactured the BIOS chip on your son's computer?
  3. You are correct (about the irrelevant issue). It didn't have display, and the power kept cycling, but aftr a few hours powered off, we could get to windows. It probably is not the driver. After giving up last night, the PC booted today, and we rolled back the driver and it has been stable.

    Using the onboard video with the GPU removed resulted in continuous fast beeps. Reseating the CPU is possible, but I'm going to exhaust other solutions before I start binary testing all the other components.

    Thank you for letting me know about the thermal paste. I was wondering about that.

    getochkn said:
    First and foremost, the POST happens long before Windows, and thus, any drivers load, so a bad driver will not affect POST. A computer can POST without a harddrive and any Windows or drivers at all.

    RAM slot pins don't reall bend, they are in a socket with each pin held in place by plastic and RAM chips odn't have pins to get bent or damaged. CPU could have got knocked, moving pins and unseating it, or if there is a GPU, same thing. If there is a GPU it has onboard graphics, then remove the graphics card and try the built on.

    That or remove everything and start over, noting that if you remove the CPU heatsink, you'll probably need new thermal paste to put it back together.
  4. Classical said:
    Do you know what company manufactured the BIOS chip on your son's computer?


    Winbond
  5. Best answer
    If a repeating high pitched / low pitched beep pattern is sounding, it is an indication of some kind of CPU problem. The CPU could be overheating or malfunctioning in some other way.

    if it is a single, repeating, high pitched beeping sound means that the CPU is overheating. You'll need to figure out why the CPU is getting too hot before this Award beep code will go away. Turn your computer off immediately if you hear this beep code. The longer your CPU is running hot, the higher the chance that you'll permanently damage this expensive part of your system.

    Check to see if your CPU is over heating, and replace/add thermal paste. If it is malfunctioning, then in the worst case scenario you'll need to buy a new one, unless you have warrenty or your CPU manufacturer is willing to send a new one. Before doing this, try the thermal paste first.

    Hope this helps,
    Hayden
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