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750w PSU enough for 2 1080ti's?

So, I know they haven't been released, but the TDP has been confirmed to be 250w. My question is, would a 750w Titanium PSU be enough for 2 in SLI? I would not be overclocking. My other components are an i7 6700k, Kraken X61, Avexir DDR4 Plasma RAM @ 2666, Hue+, 6 fans, and a PCI WiFi card.
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More about 750w psu 1080ti
  1. you'd likely be pushing it. they say 250w but that's probably only a reference card with best case scenario. i'm expecting closer to 275w on average and closer to 300w for overclocked models. the 1080 says it uses 180w but the reference card regularly hits the power limit of 225w. no reason to think the 1080ti with a potential of 300w used (6-pin, 8-pin and pcie slot) will only use the 250w they claim. custom cards will have 2 x 8-pins raising this limit to 375w possible!!

    with that said, i don't think that's enough power for 2 of them. just a guess since we have no reviews to read yet but you'll be pushing it with 750w with an educated guess. that i7 at stock is not too bad at 100w but overclocked can use a ton of power.

    best case you're at at least 600w right there. most likely with power levels higher than advertised, you're pushing 700w just with the cpu and gpu's. that's not counting the rest of the system which will use another 100w on average.
  2. Math Geek said:
    you'd likely be pushing it. they say 250w but that's probably only a reference card with best case scenario. i'm expecting closer to 275w on average and closer to 300w for overclocked models. the 1080 says it uses 180w but the reference card regularly hits the power limit of 225w. no reason to think the 1080ti with a potential of 300w used (6-pin, 8-pin and pcie slot) will only use the 250w they claim. custom cards will have 2 x 8-pins raising this limit to 375w possible!!

    with that said, i don't think that's enough power for 2 of them. just a guess since we have no reviews to read yet but you'll be pushing it with 750w with an educated guess. that i7 at stock is not too bad at 100w but overclocked can use a ton of power.

    best case you're at at least 600w right there. most likely with power levels higher than advertised, you're pushing 700w just with the cpu and gpu's.


    Alright, thanks. Since my PSU is of pretty solid quality (Titanium), would it hurt to put two of them in there once they've been released, and see if it works? I've heard that if you max out a PSU/demand more power from it than it's capable of doing, it can fry the entire PC, but I'm not sure.
  3. depends on the protections the psu has built in. a quality unit made by a respected brand will simply shut itself down before damaging itself or the pc. a junk unit with little protection built in can blow itself and take some or all of your pc's with it.

    "titanium" is not an indication of quality. it is simply a sticker the company slapped on the side of the psu suggesting it is efficient. titanium means that 90+% of the power it pulls from the wall actually gets used by the pc and not wasted. depends on the load to how efficient it really is. but there is no independent testing of this to get the sticker. a company decides what they feel their psu is and slaps that sticker on it. tom's tests many psu's and finds a lot of them do not meet the requirements for the sticker on the side of it.

    there is a certification a company can seek to deserve the sticker but they often send n a fake unit with better specs than what they intend to sell to get the certification. nothing stops them from using the sticker even if they do not send one in for certification.

    what specific brand and model is this psu? if it's quality, you can try it out but there is no guarantee it will work. it may boot and surf the web but once you start a game or other gpu intensive task, the psu will shut itself down since it can't handle the load.

    if you're gonna spend $1500 on 2 gpu's it is worth it to spend a little more on a quality power plant to run them. you would not buy a Ferrari and settle for a 4 cylinder chevy engine in it to save cash. that's just silly and a waste of the car body you bought. :)
  4. Math Geek said:
    depends on the protections the psu has built in. a quality unit made by a respected brand will simply shut itself down before damaging itself or the pc. a junk unit with little protection built in can blow itself and take some or all of your pc's with it.

    "titanium" is not an indication of quality. it is simply a sticker the company slapped on the side of the psu suggesting it is efficient. titanium means that 90+% of the power it pulls from the wall actually gets used by the pc and not wasted. depends on the load to how efficient it really is. but there is no independent testing of this to get the sticker. a company decides what they feel their psu is and slaps that sticker on it. tom's tests many psu's and finds a lot of them do not meet the requirements for the sticker on the side of it.

    there is a certification a company can seek to deserve the sticker but they often send n a fake unit with better specs than what they intend to sell to get the certification. nothing stops them from using the sticker even if they do not send one in for certification.

    what specific brand and model is this psu? if it's quality, you can try it out but there is no guarantee it will work. it may boot and surf the web but once you start a game or other gpu intensive task, the psu will shut itself down since it can't handle the load.

    if you're gonna spend $1500 on 2 gpu's it is worth it to spend a little more on a quality power plant to run them. you would not buy a Ferrari and settle for a 4 cylinder chevy engine in it to save cash. that's just silly and a waste of the car body you bought. :)


    This is the PSU I own. It's by EVGA. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B018JYHB2S/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  5. that is a top notch psu. pretty much nothing better on the market so kudos for that great choice :)

    it'll protect itself from any problems if it can't handle the cards. you'd be safe to give it a try. likely you'll see it not be able to power everything, but it won't go up in a blaze of fire if it can't handle it. though not recommended to run very long at high loads, if i was gonna try to run one that way, this would be a top choice to do it.
  6. I would not do that. If you can afford 2X 1080 ti's then spend anouther 120 bucks and buy a power supply to go with it.
  7. i'd not either, but to answer his question, the psu won't blow up if it does not like it. it'll just shut down.

    can probably sell that psu on this site for a pretty penny and offset the cost of a stronger model. the 8/950 would be more ideal. could get wel over $100 for that psu used to offset the cost. a thought anyway
  8. Math Geek said:
    i'd not either, but to answer his question, the psu won't blow up if it does not like it. it'll just shut down.

    can probably sell that psu on this site for a pretty penny and offset the cost of a stronger model. the 8/950 would be more ideal. could get wel over $100 for that psu used to offset the cost. a thought anyway


    I may do that if I ever do pick up 2 1080ti's. If I do pick up a higher wattage PSU, would it be worth spending another 100USD, and just get the 1000w Titanium PSU of the same kind? I feel that would give me enough headway that I'd have headroom for more accessories, fans, CPU upgradability, and overclocking. What do you think?
  9. yah 1000w would be ample even for overclocking and so on.

    you should be able to sell that psu for a good bit to offset the cost some. it's a great psu and would be worth it for someone to pick it up from you used.
  10. Math Geek said:
    yah 1000w would be ample even for overclocking and so on.

    you should be able to sell that psu for a good bit to offset the cost some. it's a great psu and would be worth it for someone to pick it up from you used.


    Definitely, given I paid the price of a 1000w standard PSU for it. Thanks!
  11. Best answer
    750 watts will be more than enough to power both GPU's, you will just be getting fairly close to the PSU's max output capability. Don't expect that build to pull over 650Watts of power, you don't need to upgrade your psu.
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