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thermal liquid onto the cpu / delid

should I put the liquid first on the cpu and then a little bit on the ihs (under) before reapplying it?
or should I just put it on the cpu and not at all on the ihs and just put it back on.
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about thermal liquid cpu delid
  1. You've obviously researched delidding, what did that recommend? I always thought the point was to not use an IHS after delidding.
  2. ^ the point of deliding is to replace the crap TIM between the die and IHS.

    Doing "naked CPU" - mounting the cooler directly on the die without IHS is not simple.
    1. the CPU retention will prevent the cooler from contacting the CPU die and thus have to be removed.
    2. some mounting mechanisms are too "tall" and will also prevent contact between the cooler and CPU die if the IHS removed.
    3. once 1 and 2 solved, the mounting is not an easy task as even contact between the CPU die and cooler's coldplate might be very difficult to achieve.
    with many years of experience it took me quite some time (days!!! since i had to drain, remount, fill and repeat) to mount the cooler on the CPU without IHS in a way that I'll not see 20C difference between cores under load. In the process, it is very possible to kill the CPU (fry or physically damage the die).
    The gain of removing IHS is very small.

    So for a newbie, I'd recommend:
    1. using non conductive thermal paste (no liquid metals unless you are 100% you understand what you are doing)
    2. put the IHS back. you don't have to "glue" it back, just make sure it is fixated and centered with the retention bracket in the socket
  3. as n0ns3ns3 said, I used AS5 on the die, under no circumstances try and mount your cooler direct to the die, not only is it very difficult, but also a little too much pressure and you'll crush the die, bye bye cpu, also, after delidding, make sure you remove all of the black sticky rubbish intel use to hold the IHS down, rubbing alcohol did this for me.

    As I was originally going to use liquid metal ultra or whatever its called, I covered the VRM next to the die with clear nail varnish to protect them from the TIM, a very very thin layer of TIM is all that's required, just cover the top of the die only, do not put any under the IHS, you can check its made proper contact by putting the IHS back on, pressing down a little to simulate your heatsink pressure and then removing the IHS again, if theres TIM on the underside of the IHS, then you know you're ok, remove all TIM from the die and underside of the IHS and then repeat the process, this time mounting the cpu into the socket first, the hardest part is getting the IHS to sit straight whilst you try and close the retention bracket.

    once its all mounted back into the socket, then apply thermal paste and your heatsink / water block back on in the normal way.
  4. n0ns3ns3 said:
    ^ the point of deliding is to replace the crap TIM between the die and IHS.

    Doing "naked CPU" - mounting the cooler directly on the die without IHS is not simple.
    1. the CPU retention will prevent the cooler from contacting the CPU die and thus have to be removed.
    2. some mounting mechanisms are too "tall" and will also prevent contact between the cooler and CPU die if the IHS removed.
    3. once 1 and 2 solved, the mounting is not an easy task as even contact between the CPU die and cooler's coldplate might be very difficult to achieve.
    with many years of experience it took me quite some time (days!!! since i had to drain, remount, fill and repeat) to mount the cooler on the CPU without IHS in a way that I'll not see 20C difference between cores under load. In the process, it is very possible to kill the CPU (fry or physically damage the die).
    The gain of removing IHS is very small.

    So for a newbie, I'd recommend:
    1. using non conductive thermal paste (no liquid metals unless you are 100% you understand what you are doing)
    2. put the IHS back. you don't have to "glue" it back, just make sure it is fixated and centered with the retention bracket in the socket

    I was not considering removing the IHS just replacing the TIM with liquid metal and put the IHS back on but I was wondering if I need to put some liquid metal under the IHS aswell like they do in this video --> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6KFzoFwYrE&t=915s about 15minutes into the video you can see it
  5. culzone said:
    n0ns3ns3 said:
    ^ the point of deliding is to replace the crap TIM between the die and IHS.

    Doing "naked CPU" - mounting the cooler directly on the die without IHS is not simple.
    1. the CPU retention will prevent the cooler from contacting the CPU die and thus have to be removed.
    2. some mounting mechanisms are too "tall" and will also prevent contact between the cooler and CPU die if the IHS removed.
    3. once 1 and 2 solved, the mounting is not an easy task as even contact between the CPU die and cooler's coldplate might be very difficult to achieve.
    with many years of experience it took me quite some time (days!!! since i had to drain, remount, fill and repeat) to mount the cooler on the CPU without IHS in a way that I'll not see 20C difference between cores under load. In the process, it is very possible to kill the CPU (fry or physically damage the die).
    The gain of removing IHS is very small.

    So for a newbie, I'd recommend:
    1. using non conductive thermal paste (no liquid metals unless you are 100% you understand what you are doing)
    2. put the IHS back. you don't have to "glue" it back, just make sure it is fixated and centered with the retention bracket in the socket

    I was not considering removing the IHS just replacing the TIM with liquid metal and put the IHS back on but I was wondering if I need to put some liquid metal under the IHS aswell like they do in this video --> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6KFzoFwYrE&t=915s about 15minutes into the video you can see it


    No don't put the liquid metal under the lid, once you put it on the core, it will transfer to the lid anyway.
  6. Best answer
    I put VERY THIN layer of liquid metal on both the die and IHS. Some CPUs have components or exposed copper contacts around die.
    if you going to use the liquid metal, make sure you have those isolated either with silicon or something else. be sure the isolation can handle high temperatures.
    The liquid metal I use is thermal grizzly conductonaut.
    Beware that you can ruin the system with liquid metal, so use with care. I do not recommend to glue the IHS back.
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