Why not an Intel K series CPU on an H270 mobo?

Hi. I am putting together a machine that I intend to meet certain criteria:

So far, I am looking at an ASUS STRIX H270F mobo, i7-7700K CPU, and an nVidia 1080 ti. I have chosen the 7700K over the locked version because it has a significant boost to base frequency and is supposedly a better binned chip, so even though I will not be oc'n it, for the additional price of $30 and a better cooler, it seems like it might be worth doing. I do not wish to oc because I want the machine to last a long time and it will be running many hours a day. Is my logic faulty, what do you say?

Lastly, how diminished are the returns of having more than 16gb of RAM? I will not be doing any serious production rendering, but I am curious about trying out a RAM disc setup. What sort of memory setup would you be shooting for with a machine like this?

Thanks.
Reply to GreenBeing
5 answers Last reply
More about intel series cpu h270 mobo
  1. Overclocking has nothing to do with how long parts last. Either you have a safe overclock or you don't.
    I would get a Z270 board anyhow for the ability to overclock in the future the extra cost can be well worth it.
    Say 4 years from now your not getting the performance you wish then instead of rebuilding again you just OC the chip boosting the performance back up.
    The memory depends on the size of what your rendering I have 32GB up from 16GB the most I have used is about 24GB but running out really sux compaired to having a bit to much.
    Reply to Zerk2012
  2. Zerk2012 said:
    Overclocking has nothing to do with how long parts last. Either you have a safe overclock or you don't.
    I would get a Z270 board anyhow for the ability to overclock in the future the extra cost can be well worth it.
    Say 4 years from now your not getting the performance you wish then instead of rebuilding again you just OC the chip boosting the performance back up.
    The memory depends on the size of what your rendering I have 32GB up from 16GB the most I have used is about 24GB but running out really sux compaired to having a bit to much.

    Thanks for the reply. I have always understood that thermal degradation of a CPU is a thing. I would really like to read the source of your statement about overclocking and part life.

    I hear your argument about getting the "free" upgrade down the road through a simple oc. That is a strong argument. Moore's law is slowing down though. I could almost see me wanting a new mobo with newer storage options etc. in 4-5 years before I would need more clock speed. The problem that I kept running into while looking for a board is that the Z270 boards that had the feature's that I wanted were also loaded down with a ton of crap that I did not want (on-board Wi-Fi, excessive lighting, ect..). What sold me on the STRIX H270 was the good on-board audio, which is a must for me, and no on-board Wi-Fi, which is also a must for me.
    Reply to GreenBeing
  3. If your in Intels safe temperature and heat range then nothing is being damaged.
    This guy says it best.
    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/300350-31-overclocking-life-expectancy
    I have a PC with a i5 2500K overclocked to 4.8 it's been overclocked since I bought it in 2011 so that's 6 years still going strong.
    Reply to Zerk2012
  4. That was an interesting read, thanks. He seems to be saying that heat is the killer, and increased voltage has a much greater impact on heat than frequency increase. Also, the quality of the chip would be a factor. The following Anandtech article I found seems to be at odds with the fella that you linked to regarding the heat impact of frequency increases vs voltage. http://www.anandtech.com/show/2468/6
    Reply to GreenBeing
  5. Voltage increases the heat but is still a nonfactor with adequate cooling.
    Again if your in the safe voltage and heat range it does nothing to harm the chip.
    Reply to Zerk2012
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