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New Computer LOW FPS??

I just bought a new computer, it is the same as my old one, but somehow the fps when playing games is so much lower? The only difference is that my old one has 16gb RAM instead of 8GB, could this be the cause of low fps?
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  1. This probably isn't the cause of the FPS drop. Are you sure you have all your GPU drivers up-to-date? Non updated drivers can affect your PC performance because most of them are fixes
  2. 16gb vs 8gb won't impact FPS. In most games it will be faster with 8gb (by a trivial amount).

    Check your system for updates (including video drivers). Check your auto-runs and startup programs as well. Nothing should auto-run except those things which you need.
  3. bjornl said:
    16gb vs 8gb won't impact FPS. In most games it will be faster with 8gb (by a trivial amount).

    Check your system for updates (including video drivers). Check your auto-runs and startup programs as well. Nothing should auto-run except those things which you need.


    Um, thats not true at all.

    In fact if you are using integrated graphics having more onboard memory gives everything more room to breathe as some system memory thats not being used is allocated as VRAM. If you're using a GPU having 16gb allows the system more room to overflow VRAM to system ram vs your page file if your GPU doesn't have enough VRAM.
  4. bentejas10 said:
    This probably isn't the cause of the FPS drop. Are you sure you have all your GPU drivers up-to-date? Non updated drivers can affect your PC performance because most of them are fixes

    Thank you, I searched into this and all I can get is software telling me it is out of date, but I can't seem to find a way to actually get the updated software for a AMD Radeon HD 8470D , do you know anywhere by any chance?
  5. Bonewolf said:
    bentejas10 said:
    This probably isn't the cause of the FPS drop. Are you sure you have all your GPU drivers up-to-date? Non updated drivers can affect your PC performance because most of them are fixes

    Thank you, I searched into this and all I can get is software telling me it is out of date, but I can't seem to find a way to actually get the updated software for a AMD Radeon HD 8470D , do you know anywhere by any chance?



    So you have a AMD APU, the 8470D is just the name for the CPU's onboard graphics. The fact you went from 16gb down to 8gb is likely part of the reason for your slowdown.

    If you are running Windows 10 this is the latest and last drivers available. make sure you install them (Crimson beta)

    http://support.amd.com/en-us/download/desktop/legacy?product=legacy3&os=Windows%2010%20-%2064
  6. Rogue Leader said:
    Bonewolf said:
    bentejas10 said:
    This probably isn't the cause of the FPS drop. Are you sure you have all your GPU drivers up-to-date? Non updated drivers can affect your PC performance because most of them are fixes

    Thank you, I searched into this and all I can get is software telling me it is out of date, but I can't seem to find a way to actually get the updated software for a AMD Radeon HD 8470D , do you know anywhere by any chance?



    The 8470D is just the name for the CPU's onboard graphics. The fact you went from 16gb down to 8gb is likely part of the reason for your slowdown.


    okay thank you! I've never really paid attention to gpu's and gaming, because I use mine for photoshop, but the new one is supposed to be for gaming, and it is obviously not working out as that.
    So you think more RAM will be a good investment and possible solution?
  7. Best answer
    Bonewolf said:


    okay thank you! I've never really paid attention to gpu's and gaming, because I use mine for photoshop, but the new one is supposed to be for gaming, and it is obviously not working out as that.
    So you think more RAM will be a good investment and possible solution?


    More ram and see my reply above for the latest and last driver available.
  8. Bonewolf said:



    More ram and see my reply above for the latest and last driver available.


    okay thank you so much!
  9. Rogue Leader said:
    bjornl said:
    16gb vs 8gb won't impact FPS. In most games it will be faster with 8gb (by a trivial amount).

    Check your system for updates (including video drivers). Check your auto-runs and startup programs as well. Nothing should auto-run except those things which you need.


    Um, thats not true at all.

    In fact if you are using integrated graphics having more onboard memory gives everything more room to breathe as some system memory thats not being used is allocated as VRAM. If you're using a GPU having 16gb allows the system more room to overflow VRAM to system ram vs your page file if your GPU doesn't have enough VRAM.

    It is true. Read up on memory management there is overhead. Once you go above the amount you need, adding more only adds to the overhead (refresh, etc except for pseudo-sram which manages itself).
    While having more system ram (above the needed amount) will have little if any impact to onboard graphics speed. They don't use that much ram and adding more does not typically speed things up because the bandwidth and performance that the onboard. Most programs are still win32 apps and while theoretically capable of using 4gb, the bulk of them are capped to 2.5gb. I imagine most games follow this, although I'm not certain. I'm not advocating for small memory amounts only pointing out that the role of large memory in system performance is commonly mis-understood.
    For example you suggesting that the drop from 16 to 8gb is the reason an onboard graphics would slow down. What are the odds that the onboard graphics can make effective use of more than 2.5gb? Trivial. What are the odds that any given program (other than professional applications) would have any performance issues with the available ram dropping from a likely 11gb to a likely 5.5gb? Again trivial.
    I would guess that the greatest gains on that system would come from turning, patching and such rather than plunking down another 40 bucks on ram. Better to save that 40 bucks for an eventual discrete video card if you want to game.
  10. bjornl said:
    Rogue Leader said:
    bjornl said:
    16gb vs 8gb won't impact FPS. In most games it will be faster with 8gb (by a trivial amount).

    Check your system for updates (including video drivers). Check your auto-runs and startup programs as well. Nothing should auto-run except those things which you need.


    Um, thats not true at all.

    In fact if you are using integrated graphics having more onboard memory gives everything more room to breathe as some system memory thats not being used is allocated as VRAM. If you're using a GPU having 16gb allows the system more room to overflow VRAM to system ram vs your page file if your GPU doesn't have enough VRAM.

    It is true. Read up on memory management there is overhead. Once you go above the amount you need, adding more only adds to the overhead (refresh, etc except for pseudo-sram which manages itself).
    While having more system ram (above the needed amount) will have little if any impact to onboard graphics speed. They don't use that much ram and adding more does not typically speed things up because the bandwidth and performance that the onboard. Most programs are still win32 apps and while theoretically capable of using 4gb, the bulk of them are capped to 2.5gb. I imagine most games follow this, although I'm not certain. I'm not advocating for small memory amounts only pointing out that the role of large memory in system performance is commonly mis-understood.
    For example you suggesting that the drop from 16 to 8gb is the reason an onboard graphics would slow down. What are the odds that the onboard graphics can make effective use of more than 2.5gb? Trivial. What are the odds that any given program (other than professional applications) would have any performance issues with the available ram dropping from a likely 11gb to a likely 5.5gb? Again trivial.
    I would guess that the greatest gains on that system would come from turning, patching and such rather than plunking down another 40 bucks on ram. Better to save that 40 bucks for an eventual discrete video card if you want to game.


    No, most new or current programs are not win32 apps anymore these days, as well he is running games, which he is saying is running slower given the same system with half the memory and he is using the onboard graphics. Anything AAA made past 2013 or so is guaranteed to be 64 bit which means it can and will utilize all available memory. If he has 8gb of ram the onboard graphics have reserved a minimum of 1gb of that ram for VRAM, AMD APUs are known for this. So now 7 gb (not even taking into account system reserved), so if a game needs any memory beyond 7gb, it turns to the page file, the iGPU can do this too if the game has filled up the ram. This causes FPS drops. Many games for a long while have been calling for a minimum of 8gb of ram.

    Doubling the system ram allows the iGPU to use prettymuch whatever it wants without impacting system ram and neither the CPU nor iGPU need to hit the page file. This is a common issue we have seen with using AMD APUs but it can even happen with a regular GPU if they run out of ram and need to roll over to system ram. Hence why 2GB GPUs are not enough for high detail 1080p gaming these days.
  11. Rogue Leader said:
    bjornl said:
    Rogue Leader said:
    bjornl said:
    16gb vs 8gb won't impact FPS. In most games it will be faster with 8gb (by a trivial amount).

    Check your system for updates (including video drivers). Check your auto-runs and startup programs as well. Nothing should auto-run except those things which you need.


    Um, thats not true at all.

    In fact if you are using integrated graphics having more onboard memory gives everything more room to breathe as some system memory thats not being used is allocated as VRAM. If you're using a GPU having 16gb allows the system more room to overflow VRAM to system ram vs your page file if your GPU doesn't have enough VRAM.

    It is true. Read up on memory management there is overhead. Once you go above the amount you need, adding more only adds to the overhead (refresh, etc except for pseudo-sram which manages itself).
    While having more system ram (above the needed amount) will have little if any impact to onboard graphics speed. They don't use that much ram and adding more does not typically speed things up because the bandwidth and performance that the onboard. Most programs are still win32 apps and while theoretically capable of using 4gb, the bulk of them are capped to 2.5gb. I imagine most games follow this, although I'm not certain. I'm not advocating for small memory amounts only pointing out that the role of large memory in system performance is commonly mis-understood.
    For example you suggesting that the drop from 16 to 8gb is the reason an onboard graphics would slow down. What are the odds that the onboard graphics can make effective use of more than 2.5gb? Trivial. What are the odds that any given program (other than professional applications) would have any performance issues with the available ram dropping from a likely 11gb to a likely 5.5gb? Again trivial.
    I would guess that the greatest gains on that system would come from turning, patching and such rather than plunking down another 40 bucks on ram. Better to save that 40 bucks for an eventual discrete video card if you want to game.


    No, most new or current programs are not win32 apps anymore these days, as well he is running games, which he is saying is running slower given the same system with half the memory and he is using the onboard graphics. Anything AAA made past 2013 or so is guaranteed to be 64 bit which means it can and will utilize all available memory. If he has 8gb of ram the onboard graphics have reserved a minimum of 1gb of that ram for VRAM, AMD APUs are known for this. So now 7 gb (not even taking into account system reserved), so if a game needs any memory beyond 7gb, it turns to the page file, the iGPU can do this too if the game has filled up the ram. This causes FPS drops. Many games for a long while have been calling for a minimum of 8gb of ram.

    Doubling the system ram allows the iGPU to use prettymuch whatever it wants without impacting system ram and neither the CPU nor iGPU need to hit the page file. This is a common issue we have seen with using AMD APUs but it can even happen with a regular GPU if they run out of ram and need to roll over to system ram. Hence why 2GB GPUs are not enough for high detail 1080p gaming these days.

    Not interested in continuing the dialog here beyond this comment, but most programs do in fact remain win32 so as to remain backwards compatible with 32bit windows which by demographics remains very common. I haven't worked at the "evil empire" for a few years and so I don't know the current demographics. But Microsoft offers some bundles which are 32bit versions of the OS at a very steep discount which is why you see 2 and 4gb new for 2017 PCs. Couple that with all the legacy xp, vista and win7 32bit PCs out there and I would be very surprised if 64bit was in the majority. Win32apps run just fine on 64bit, via wow64 but 64bit apps can not run on 32bits in any way. Some programs use a 32bit loader which then selects a 32bit or 64bit exe, but this is not super common based on my unscientific observations.
    Even in areas where you would think 64 bit is a given, it is not the case. For example, my favorite render program is 32bit and capped at 2.5gb of memory. Hacking it to use up to 3.5 is possible but reduces stability.
    You may be right about games being mostly 64bit, particularly AAA ones.. I don't know I only play a small sub-sample of games and since I have a very high end PC I only notice if something is 32bit if it starts having issues as it approaches the semi-magical 2.5gb barrier.
  12. bjornl said:

    Not interested in continuing the dialog here beyond this comment, but most programs do in fact remain win32 so as to remain backwards compatible with 32bit windows which by demographics remains very common. I haven't worked at the "evil empire" for a few years and so I don't know the current demographics. But Microsoft offers some bundles which are 32bit versions of the OS at a very steep discount which is why you see 2 and 4gb new for 2017 PCs. Couple that with all the legacy xp, vista and win7 32bit PCs out there and I would be very surprised if 64bit was in the majority. Win32apps run just fine on 64bit, via wow64 but 64bit apps can not run on 32bits in any way. Some programs use a 32bit loader which then selects a 32bit or 64bit exe, but this is not super common based on my unscientific observations.
    Even in areas where you would think 64 bit is a given, it is not the case. For example, my favorite render program is 32bit and capped at 2.5gb of memory. Hacking it to use up to 3.5 is possible but reduces stability.
    You may be right about games being mostly 64bit, particularly AAA ones.. I don't know I only play a small sub-sample of games and since I have a very high end PC I only notice if something is 32bit if it starts having issues as it approaches the semi-magical 2.5gb barrier.


    Yes I agree theres still a lot of current 32 bit programs out there, but as mentioned this person is having issues with Games. Thats where is issue lies and thats also what eats up memory, in his case.
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