Solved

Good Future Proof PC?

I plan to play csgo, r6siege, and overwatch and 60-144 fps (if I can) at 1080p at the highest setting possible where I can achieve a stable framerate (144 or 60hz). I also plan to upgrade In the future. Is this a good pc for those games and future proof?

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/2bqzXH

Very tight budget. Nothing higher than 500 usd if you plan building me a better pc.
Reply to Vazzn15
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about good future proof
  1. This will not push High/Ultra above 60 FPS stable except maybe CSGO. If you want a card capable of that in those games try save a bit more for an RX 470 4GB if you can, it'll be better in the long run. As for the CPU change the motherboard to a B250 with 4 RAM slots so you can upgrade to 16GB later, 8GB is already starting to lack in gaming. Change the CPU to a Pentium G4560 it performs on par with the i3 6100 and is real cheap. Also you don't really need a cooler since you can't overclock on that CPU. The stock one would do just fine if you need to save a few bucks. Hope this helps :)

    Here is a Partlist > https://pcpartpicker.com/list/vsJrnn

    But this would be better it comes with a more reliable and efficient Power Supply > https://pcpartpicker.com/list/gGfbxY
    Reply to CRO5513Y
  2. There is no such thing as future proofing for PC (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9jG1-gjHJk).
    Reply to MeesterYellow
  3. Depends how you look at it. Are you saying if I purchased 64GB DDR4 right now that I wouldn't be futureproofed for memory? Or got a GTX 1080 Ti for 720p that I wouldn't be futureproofed? It certainly does exsist but indeed it only to a certain degree. Spend more now for not needing upgrades for longer is more what I am meaning by “futureproof” in my response.
    Reply to CRO5513Y
  4. CRO5513Y said:
    Depends how you look at it. Are you saying if I purchased 64GB DDR4 right now that I wouldn't be futureproofed for memory? Or got a GTX 1080 Ti for 720p that I wouldn't be futureproofed? It certainly does exsist but indeed it only to a certain degree. Spend more now for not needing upgrades for longer is more what I am meaning by “futureproof” in my response.

    Have you even watched the video? It's stupid to assume that you can future proof your PC but in reality, you can't. You will never need to use 64 GB of ram as 32 GB is a lot more than anyone ever uses. Games barely even use 16 GB. 1080 Ti for 720p? There are a bunch of older GPUs that will handle 720p as 720p was revolutionary a few years ago. Almost 3 years ago, the 970 and 980 were introduced. Almost two years ago, 980 Ti was introduced. Now there are 1070 and 1080 (last year), and 1080 Ti this year, the gap in between aren't much. It's impossible to future proof CPUs and GPUs as they both evolve fast.
    Reply to MeesterYellow
  5. https://pcpartpicker.com/list/4sWzRG

    Id get something more along the lines of that
    Reply to bkrish546
  6. Best answer
    In terms of technology, sure, you can't future proof. Something better is always around the corner. But most people consider "future proofing" with respect to "can I play the latest stuff at 1080p at 60 Hz in three years?" not "will my parts still be shiny in three years?". In that respect, yes, you can. If I had a "older GPU" then it may only last until the end of this year playing the latest games at max on 1080p (for example, my old 770 SLI struggles with modern stuff on max), but if I got a 1080 ti, I'll be playing on 1080p for the next few years with plenty of VRAM and power under the hood, and since I don't care about 4k I'll have an equal experience to most other gamers that swap parts on a yearly basis to keep 4k at max. The difference being: I am at 1080p 144Hz happy with old school, the yearly swappers are at 4k 60Hz chasing the bleeding edge. Either philosophy is fine, but mine is less expensive.

    One has to look at which parts "degenerate" faster than others. The GPU becomes obsolete along with HDD the fastest in terms of "performance" parts (CPU's are give and take, some have big leaps, others barely anything, get a "tock" CPU since those are the refined versions of a generation), so you want to have the GPU as the most advanced part of the rig (with a CPU that won't choke it). A CPU can hang on for a long time if you overclock, and RAM depends if there is a DDR generation change. I was actually torn between upgrading from a i5-2500k since I had it OC'd to 4.5 GHz which is nothing to sneeze at. A 4670k would be a good "modern" chip that would last a long time. Ultimately, only 16GB of RAM is really necessary, but I'd recommend a single stick of it so you can add more if needed later. The key to a "future proofed" machine is to get a crazy GPU, a CPU that doesn't bottleneck the GPU, and then everything else centred around the idea of "I can add more if I need it". Be sure you get a Gsync/freesync monitor though since something like a 1080 ti will be crushing fps in the near future and could cause screen tearing, but I suppose Vsync could take care of some of that.

    As for the build posted, it looks good for the price point, but with a budget of 500 I don't think you'll be able to achieve the kind of "future proofing" you'd want. It would be fine I think for what you want to play in this current gen, but you'll quickly start seeing the processor getting strained and eventually the GPU won't be able to keep up with newer games. If you plan on upgrading down the line, I'd recommend getting an i5, 16GB of RAM, and then getting a 1070 or 60 with a bunch of VRAM (I think some AIBs are already releasing 10xx with increased VRAM.). Unfortunately, when it comes to "future proofing" there is a correlation between expense and (performance) longevity most of the time since you basically have to overkill for the current generation to "keep up" in the next gen. The hardest part of it all is *not* to wait for the "next best thing" since that puts you in the mindset of always waiting, it's better to spend more now than constantly buying new parts just to keep up, I made that error with my first build.
    Reply to Atterus
Ask a new question Answer

Read More

Video Games Framerate FPS