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Building a PC for under 2k

Hey all, I have asked a few questions in the past here and this was a helpful forum.

I'm looking to get a Revolt from iBuyPower to replace my old Dell XPS. I am looking for something that is very future proof and willing to pay to get it.

Here is the best I could find on iBuyPower for around $1870. Are there any red flags or bottlenecks I need to be aware of? I had some troubles with the AMD 5870 I'm replacing so I want to stick with nivida.

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Revolt 2 Extreme Daily Special
Case 1 x iBUYPOWER Revolt 2 Gaming Case

Case Lighting 1 x Revolt 2 RGB Case Lighting (Included)

Processor 1 x Intel® Core™ i7-7700K Processor (4x 4.20GHz/8MB L3 Cache) - Intel® Core™ i7-7700K

Processor Cooling 1 x Asetek 550LC 120mm Liquid CPU Cooler - Standard 120mm Fan [Revolt]

Memory 1 x 16 GB [8 GB X2] DDR4-2400 Memory Module - Corsair or Major Brand

Video Card 1 x NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Founders Edition 11GB (VR Ready)

Free Game Bundle 1 x [FREE Game Download] - Intel Enthusiast Gaming Bundle 2017 Q1 (Halo Wars 2, Euro Truck Sim 2, Dreadnought) - w/ purchase of Intel® Core™ i5 or i7

Free Game Bundle 1 x [FREE Game Download] - Be the Hero Bundle - For Honor or Ghost Recon: Wildland - w/ purchase of NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1060, 1070 or 1080 Video Card

Motherboard 1 x ASRock Z270M-ITX/AC -- 1x PCIe x16, 6x USB 3.0, 2x USB 2.0, 1x M.2 [Intel Optane Ready]

Power Supply 1 x 1000 Watt - Standard 80 PLUS Bronze

Primary Hard Drive 1 x 480 GB Toshiba OCZ TR150 SATA-3 SSD -- Read: 550MB/s; Write: 530MB/s - Single Drive

Data Hard Drive 1 x 2 TB Hard Drive -- 64MB Cache, 7200RPM, 6.0Gb/s - Single Drive

Sound Card 1 x 3D Premium Surround Sound Onboard

Operating System 1 x Windows 10 Home - (64-bit)

Keyboard 1 x iBUYPOWER Standard Gaming Keyboard

Mouse 1 x iBUYPOWER Standard Gaming Mouse

I hope that formatted decently.
12 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Buying a pre-built gaming PC is a mistake but, you need to get the major brand memory. That cost 90 bucks more almost the price you can buy 16gb for the memory your going to get is the cheapest crap they can have made for them.
    Same with the power supply get the EVGA 750 GQ or the Corsair RM750x. Their standard power supply is again the cheapest crap they can have made for them. The same thing here upgrading to a decent power dupply cost almost the price of one.
  2. Best answer
    For the same price (but excluding the standard keyboard, standard mouse, and case lighting and the free game bundles), I would suggest these better parts for your consideration:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($339.64 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Jet)
    Motherboard: ASRock Z270 Killer SLI/ac ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($132.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2800 Memory ($106.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($177.89 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($69.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: MSI GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB Founders Edition Video Card ($698.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($89.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Operating System: Microsoft Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($89.98 @ NCIX US)
    Total: $1870.93
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-04-07 14:49 EDT-0400

    CPU, GPU, HDD and OS are the same.
    CPU Cooler --> better double-rad (240mm) compared to a single-rad (120mm) in thermal performance and noise.
    Motherboard --> better ATX with 4x RAM slots and SLI-capabilities. same with Wifi/Bluetooth as the ITX version.
    Memory --> G.Skill (branded) faster 2800MHz and dual-channel.
    Storage (SSD) --> better/faster Samsung 850 EVO 500GB (slightly higher capacity than 480GB).
    Case --> fits the suggested parts. aesthetics are subjective to your taste. good-quality case/cable management.
    PSU --> better-quality and ample wattage (actually more than enough to power your rig).
  3. Thank you for the replies guys, my concern with buying individual parts is how and who to put them together.

    Any suggestions on that?
  4. As others have stated build your own and pay someone you know to do it.

    The ibuypower, cyberpowerpc, and pretty much all the prebuilts are not good. The simple fact that they state a 1000w PSU for a single 1080 ti shows that they know it is a crappy PSU and they just hope that the junk 1000w unit can output the 400w the system will actually use.

    The SSD drive is also crap and you will only see minimal speed improvement in it over a normal hard drive.
  5. Paying someone I know to do it is not an option because I do not know anyone who builds PC's.

    I realize that something like an iBuyPower may not be the best bet, but I would trust a company who does this as a business over some random person I met on line to do it for me.

    So my issue is, unless this is something that I can do myself (I have replaced GPU's and ram) I will have to go through a PC building company.
  6. Cnconrad said:
    Paying someone I know to do it is not an option because I do not know anyone who builds PC's.

    I realize that something like an iBuyPower may not be the best bet, but I would trust a company who does this as a business over some random person I met on line to do it for me.

    So my issue is, unless this is something that I can do myself (I have replaced GPU's and ram) I will have to go through a PC building company.


    Not quite the best assumption. iBuyPower is a business that capitalizes on unknowing users. As long as the PC lasts beyond the warranty period they dont give a crap, odds are that 1000w PSU can hold up to 400w load for a year, after that year it is a crapshoot but they are off the hook.

    Even a local shop has way more motivation to do a good job over iBuyPower.

    If you have replaced GPU and RAM, know how to use basic tools and understand what the parts actualy are (know what the GPU is vs the RAM vs a CPU) then you can build a PC. There are so so many guides on youtube and the rest of internet and we always here to help. Just watch a few videos and take your time with things (espically inserting the CPU and the power supply connections). and you should be fine, and if there is an issue we are here to help.
  7. So the overall statement is I need a quality name brand power supply.

    Thanks that's the kind of bottleneck I was look.

    The SSD seemed fine to me. The 850 EVO that was suggested has sequential read (540MB/s and write (520MB/s) the SSD I had Read: 550MB/s; Write: 530MB/ why is that worse?

    I'm not nessissarly looking for the cheapest possible solution, I'm looking for some reliability and there are no computer builders available in the area.

    If there is a better builder than ibuypower in interested in hearing.

    Are there any other big holes in the build?
  8. Beacause those read write speeds are pretending that your data is perfectly sequential in a row, while in reality the files are all over the place. The random 4k read write numbers tell the real story and that is where the Samsung really outshines the Toshiba tlc chips.
  9. Also, do gaming PC's really have that much of a failure rate?

    I have owned 3 computers in my life 2 desktop 1 laptop and I have never had anything fail.

    My current system is 8 years old and used every day.
  10. Its not that a "gaming pc" has a high failure rate.

    What it comes down to is a combination of company manipulation and mismatched PSU real performance vs -PC needs.

    Your general office desktop needs 100w of power to run, so even your mediocore 300w PSU found inside most of them will run it just fine because it is demanding a low percentage of power vs the max.

    A gaming computer on the other hand needs 75w to 400w more of power (depening on GPU and other hardware).
    Many companies have figured out that they can profit off of user ignorance of "bigger number equal better" mentality so they market a PSU that cant really sustain 600w as being 1000w because they can. So the user buys that 1000w PSU, puts it under a 400w real world load and sometime latter (maybee a week, maybe a year or a little beyond) and POOF their PSU dies, said PSU lacks any quality including safegaurd circuitry (over voltage, under voltage, short circuit, etc) and thus that PSUs rouge electricity spike surges through your parts and fries them.

    So in a nutshell is not that gaming computers have a higher failure rate, its simply that gaming computers draw more power and put more load on its parts, and if you dont get parts suited for the job then you are going to end up with a dead computer. Unfortunately there are plenty of companies willing to make a buck off off this ignorance/being cheap.
  11. As the others have said, unless there is a reason you can't assemble the PC yourself, you are always going to get a better build and a better value by building it yourself. For me the hardest part of the assembly is connecting the wires from the front of the case (Power button, reset switch, HDD LED, etc.) to the front panel header. The pins on the front panel header are small and you need decent eyesight to get them all connected correctly. I end up taking off my eyeglasses and getting real close with a LED light strapped to my forehead.

    If you can't build it, can you get ibuypower to use a specific PSU? What the others have said is true. I would buy a Seasonic G series or the EVGA Supernova and be prepared to swap out the no-name unit they installed, so when it fails you don't fry all of your parts.
  12. Cnconrad said:
    Also, do gaming PC's really have that much of a failure rate?

    I have owned 3 computers in my life 2 desktop 1 laptop and I have never had anything fail.

    My current system is 8 years old and used every day.


    Usually the thing that fails the most on a gaming PC is the power supply. Poor quality PSUs can cripple even the highest end PCs. Which is usually why we put triple emphasis on the quality of the power supply that you choose for your build, because in the long run, going cheap on your PSU can cost you more money. And that is one of our biggest concerns with going Cyberpower / IBUYPOWER. They're known for using junk, no name brands on a lot of crucial components - especially the power supply - to save money on the manufacturing aspect. And then a lot of the horror stories I've read on here is in the event that something does fail - PSU being the main culprit, is that if you have to RMA anything then you will get hosed on shipping. If a PSU fails, or another critical component, and you have to send it to Cyberpower, you have to pay for shipping, and depending on the weight, that can get really costly. The thing about building your own system that makes it better is that you know exactly every single component that goes into your system. And building it yourself ensures that you get a 100% completely clean installation of the operating system.

    Quote:
    As the others have said, unless there is a reason you can't assemble the PC yourself, you are always going to get a better build and a better value by building it yourself. For me the hardest part of the assembly is connecting the wires from the front of the case (Power button, reset switch, HDD LED, etc.) to the front panel header. The pins on the front panel header are small and you need decent eyesight to get them all connected correctly. I end up taking off my eyeglasses and getting real close with a LED light strapped to my forehead.


    I usually hook those wires in *BEFORE* screwing down the motherboard. It eliminates the need to second guess what wires go where and you're not limited by space.
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