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AMD Ryzen overclocking with SMT disabled?

I'm planning to buy a Ryzen 1700 + B350 mobo and I would like to know if disabling SMT would benefit overclocking. My intention is to turn off SMT and get the highest stable OC possible with the stock voltage (or no more than 1.35V) and the stock cooler, since I don't really need 16 threads. Have someone tested this and could tell me the results?

Thanks in advance.
Reply to Aldagarji
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about amd ryzen overclocking smt disabled
  1. If you don't need that many threads you should get the 1600X. Initial reviews of the Ryzen CPUs didn't show any overclocking benefit to disabling SMT.
    Reply to kanewolf
  2. kanewolf said:
    If you don't need that many threads you should get the 1600X. Initial reviews of the Ryzen CPUs didn't show any overclocking benefit to disabling SMT.


    So I wouldn't get any profit at all? I prefer having 8 physical cores at a higher frequency or lower temps than having 12 threads, but if that's the case then I will consider buying a R5 1600 or 1600X. Thanks for your advice.
    Reply to Aldagarji
  3. Best answer
    Since SMT doesn't really change the amount of hardware that is active, it only provides the OS with more resources to schedule, disabling SMT with a processing load that can keep all resources busy doesn't lower temps.
    Reply to kanewolf
  4. kanewolf said:
    Since SMT doesn't really change the amount of hardware that is active, it only provides the OS with more resources to schedule, disabling SMT with a processing load that can keep all resources busy doesn't lower temps.


    Thank you for the explanation. Would it be the same for Intel's Hyperthreading? Just curious about it :)
    Reply to Aldagarji
  5. Yes, hyperthreading is the same. Just more scheduling slots (threads) that the OS can schedule simultaneously. The basic assumption is that each thread will run out of computational work because it needs a memory access, nework input, user input, etc. Have twice as many slots that the OS can run tasks in will improve the total usability of a system with a lot of jobs that aren't real busy. A job that can use all the physical resources won't benefit from SMT/hyperthreading. High performance computing (think nation labs, or weather service) may even have benchmarked their specific code and disabled hyperthreading in the BIOS.
    Reply to kanewolf
  6. kanewolf said:
    Yes, hyperthreading is the same. Just more scheduling slots (threads) that the OS can schedule simultaneously. The basic assumption is that each thread will run out of computational work because it needs a memory access, nework input, user input, etc. Have twice as many slots that the OS can run tasks in will improve the total usability of a system with a lot of jobs that aren't real busy. A job that can use all the physical resources won't benefit from SMT/hyperthreading. High performance computing (think nation labs, or weather service) may even have benchmarked their specific code and disabled hyperthreading in the BIOS.

    I've been doing research and it seems that disabling Hyperthreading does help a bit with overclocking, althought it doesn't seem the case for SMT. I'm just concerned about power consumption, stability and futureproofing and I thought turning SMT off would be beneficial for an 8-core CPU. Anyway, thanks again for your response, it was very explanatory.
    Reply to Aldagarji
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