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Best Motherboards For The Ryzen 7 1800x/1700x?

Im planning to get the 1800x if possible but if i can get the 1700x cheap i will choose it over the 1800x. That being said though im not really sure which motherboards are considered the best for it.

I wanted to get the ASRock Fatal1ty AB350 Gaming K4 one but im wondering if there are any better out there for the Ryzen 7 or not.

Price is not really an issue here since i want a quality motherboard that will be good for the ryzen 7 over a cheaper one.

Also i dont plan on ever overclocking anything but if theres an oc one thats just plan better then a non oc one then i dont mind it.
Reply to The Shadow Rose
10 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about motherboards ryzen 1800x 1700x
  1. clutchc said:


    From reading it im not sure why exactly they would pick that as the best choice for a ryzen 7. It seems to have more then a few drawbacks and the comments just mention more of them.

    Am i missing something here?
    Reply to The Shadow Rose
  2. The Shadow Rose said:
    clutchc said:


    From reading it im not sure why exactly they would pick that as the best choice for a ryzen 7. It seems to have more then a few drawbacks and the comments just mention more of them.

    Am i missing something here?


    The best MB for the Ryzen 7 1800X and 1700X is ASUS ROG Crosshair VI Hero period. A little more expensive but worth the investment.
    I am using the 1800X on my CVI Hero and no issues at all.
    You may have to wait till devs have finished Bios micro-coding issues with some RAM, which is an issue all MB manufacturers are having atm.

    Check out my Ryzen build impressions here : https://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?92489-New-Ryzen-7-1800X-build-impressions
    Reply to MeanMachine41
  3. Best answer
    I think you want a stable system above all and can comprimise on features for this.

    Then don't buy Ryzen yet, postpone a few months if you can. Current batch of AM4 motherboards are crap due to BIOS and issues that relate to BIOS and CPU, so you will not buy "best motherboard" but "best among problematic motherboards" - as all current AM4 motherboards have some issues.

    During that time, the CPU's and the capability of X370-B350 chipset will not change at all, so you will get the same features. But, two things may happen:

    1) Either the BIOS'es may become stable or some manufacturer may bring out a "hardware revised version of its motherboard" like V2.0 or like that.

    These hardware revisons may solve some of the problems somehow. Everybody is talking about software issues, but I think there are issues related to motherboard designs as well. Maybe manufacturers will analyze these and update the motherboards during that span.

    2) newly announced Threadripper, Ryzen Pro and maybe Ryzen based APU's may come out.

    The Threadripper series will require a new chipset ( it may be called X399 ) and therefore will require new motherboards - and they might be more stable and less selective in required RAM and can offer more PCIe lanes so you can connect more devices to them. If the price of Threadripper turns out to be expensive even after you save for a few months more, you can look for the performance of Ryzen Pro and APU's; maybe something will suit your needs better than Ryzen.

    The RAM is important here: for best performance you have to use the famous Samsung B-die RAMs by G.Skill ( and those 100% compatible versions of specific RAM models) - and these B-die RAM have only 8 GB caapcity; so if you want best perfroamcen you are limited to 2 x 8 GB = 16 GB RAM. If you want more RAM like 32 GB, RAM speed decreases mightily and performance drops as well.

    *** My note here: I have 4 x 8 GB DDR4 Kingston HyperX Fury 2400 MHz CL15 RAM installed and all RAM runs on dual channel and 2400 MHz. And I don't feel any performance issues at all, as far as my workloads are concerned, the system flies - it is no worse than Core i5-6402P + Gigabyte Z170 in my case. I am old and therefore can not understand how a system with 16 threads and 32 GB 2400 MHz RAM can perform worser than 16 threads and 16 GB 2933 MHz RAM ***

    As a personal note: generally as consumers when we decide that we need something new, anything actually, but in this case computers, it turns an obsession for us and with each passing day the urge to buy if as soon as possible increases and we get anxious with each passing day until we buy it.

    This happened to me as well, I had to wait for 6 weeks to purchase Ryzen 7 1700 and Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming 5 combination from the same retailer at the same time; and I was anxious as hell during that 6 weeks, I was feeling that I was missing something big.

    Then I purchased it, saw the problems I have not experienced since late 1990's, spent so much time in reinstalling it over and over, even restarting to post on forums about this bad motherboard which I had not done for last 7 years ... I am still experimenting on that Ryzen computer, since 4 weeks, but the thrill is gone. I do not feel anxious anymore, but now I worry if this combination will ever become stable at all. I subsituted one bad feeling with a worser one.

    If you *** ABSOLUTELY NEED TO PURCHASE RYZEN NOW *** then try Asus ROG Crosshair VI Hero. Asus has a proven history of good BIOS engineering and CH6 has more features that can become useful in coming few years, like Clear CMOS button on back of motherboard, front USB 3.1, ready for m.2 wifi cards, and placement of m.2 NVMe port is on the best possible location among alternatives.

    As far as BIOS engineering is concerned, MSI is average but Gigabyte BIOS engineering is a mess nowadays, my Z170 is almost two years old and still has issues in BIOS, as for X370 - I have written so much about its problems. I will definitely not buy Gigabyte for next few desktop builds.
    Reply to eyupo92
  4. Most Ryzen boards have had several AGESA updates by now. My Ryzen 5 1600X is working fine with CORSAIR Vengeance LPX 3200 MHz. (MSI Mortar Arctic). Running at 3200 MHz using A-XMP. The BIOS page shows several AGESA updates over the least few weeks.
    Reply to clutchc
  5. eyupo92 said:
    I think you want a stable system above all and can comprimise on features for this.

    Then don't buy Ryzen yet, postpone a few months if you can. Current batch of AM4 motherboards are crap due to BIOS and issues that relate to BIOS and CPU, so you will not buy "best motherboard" but "best among problematic motherboards" - as all current AM4 motherboards have some issues.

    During that time, the CPU's and the capability of X370-B350 chipset will not change at all, so you will get the same features. But, two things may happen:

    1) Either the BIOS'es may become stable or some manufacturer may bring out a "hardware revised version of its motherboard" like V2.0 or like that.

    These hardware revisons may solve some of the problems somehow. Everybody is talking about software issues, but I think there are issues related to motherboard designs as well. Maybe manufacturers will analyze these and update the motherboards during that span.

    2) newly announced Threadripper, Ryzen Pro and maybe Ryzen based APU's may come out.

    The Threadripper series will require a new chipset ( it may be called X399 ) and therefore will require new motherboards - and they might be more stable and less selective in required RAM and can offer more PCIe lanes so you can connect more devices to them. If the price of Threadripper turns out to be expensive even after you save for a few months more, you can look for the performance of Ryzen Pro and APU's; maybe something will suit your needs better than Ryzen.

    The RAM is important here: for best performance you have to use the famous Samsung B-die RAMs by G.Skill ( and those 100% compatible versions of specific RAM models) - and these B-die RAM have only 8 GB caapcity; so if you want best perfroamcen you are limited to 2 x 8 GB = 16 GB RAM. If you want more RAM like 32 GB, RAM speed decreases mightily and performance drops as well.

    *** My note here: I have 4 x 8 GB DDR4 Kingston HyperX Fury 2400 MHz CL15 RAM installed and all RAM runs on dual channel and 2400 MHz. And I don't feel any performance issues at all, as far as my workloads are concerned, the system flies - it is no worse than Core i5-6402P + Gigabyte Z170 in my case. I am old and therefore can not understand how a system with 16 threads and 32 GB 2400 MHz RAM can perform worser than 16 threads and 16 GB 2933 MHz RAM ***

    As a personal note: generally as consumers when we decide that we need something new, anything actually, but in this case computers, it turns an obsession for us and with each passing day the urge to buy if as soon as possible increases and we get anxious with each passing day until we buy it.

    This happened to me as well, I had to wait for 6 weeks to purchase Ryzen 7 1700 and Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming 5 combination from the same retailer at the same time; and I was anxious as hell during that 6 weeks, I was feeling that I was missing something big.

    Then I purchased it, saw the problems I have not experienced since late 1990's, spent so much time in reinstalling it over and over, even restarting to post on forums about this bad motherboard which I had not done for last 7 years ... I am still experimenting on that Ryzen computer, since 4 weeks, but the thrill is gone. I do not feel anxious anymore, but now I worry if this combination will ever become stable at all. I subsituted one bad feeling with a worser one.

    If you *** ABSOLUTELY NEED TO PURCHASE RYZEN NOW *** then try Asus ROG Crosshair VI Hero. Asus has a proven history of good BIOS engineering and CH6 has more features that can become useful in coming few years, like Clear CMOS button on back of motherboard, front USB 3.1, ready for m.2 wifi cards, and placement of m.2 NVMe port is on the best possible location among alternatives.

    As far as BIOS engineering is concerned, MSI is average but Gigabyte BIOS engineering is a mess nowadays, my Z170 is almost two years old and still has issues in BIOS, as for X370 - I have written so much about its problems. I will definitely not buy Gigabyte for next few desktop builds.


    Thanks for this post. I wasnt expecting anyone to put this much into my question. I dont need a ryzen now but i did have that same feeling for awhile now but wasnt sure what it was. I suppose ill wait a few months for one that has all the problems fixed. If im going to spend more then a grand on my ultimate computer i would rather it have all the right parts that work well instead of rushing it.

    Thanks again!
    Reply to The Shadow Rose
  6. eyupo92 said:
    I think you want a stable system above all and can comprimise on features for this.

    Then don't buy Ryzen yet, postpone a few months if you can. Current batch of AM4 motherboards are crap due to BIOS and issues that relate to BIOS and CPU, so you will not buy "best motherboard" but "best among problematic motherboards" - as all current AM4 motherboards have some issues.

    During that time, the CPU's and the capability of X370-B350 chipset will not change at all, so you will get the same features. But, two things may happen:

    1) Either the BIOS'es may become stable or some manufacturer may bring out a "hardware revised version of its motherboard" like V2.0 or like that.

    These hardware revisons may solve some of the problems somehow. Everybody is talking about software issues, but I think there are issues related to motherboard designs as well. Maybe manufacturers will analyze these and update the motherboards during that span.

    2) newly announced Threadripper, Ryzen Pro and maybe Ryzen based APU's may come out.

    The Threadripper series will require a new chipset ( it may be called X399 ) and therefore will require new motherboards - and they might be more stable and less selective in required RAM and can offer more PCIe lanes so you can connect more devices to them. If the price of Threadripper turns out to be expensive even after you save for a few months more, you can look for the performance of Ryzen Pro and APU's; maybe something will suit your needs better than Ryzen.

    The RAM is important here: for best performance you have to use the famous Samsung B-die RAMs by G.Skill ( and those 100% compatible versions of specific RAM models) - and these B-die RAM have only 8 GB caapcity; so if you want best perfroamcen you are limited to 2 x 8 GB = 16 GB RAM. If you want more RAM like 32 GB, RAM speed decreases mightily and performance drops as well.

    *** My note here: I have 4 x 8 GB DDR4 Kingston HyperX Fury 2400 MHz CL15 RAM installed and all RAM runs on dual channel and 2400 MHz. And I don't feel any performance issues at all, as far as my workloads are concerned, the system flies - it is no worse than Core i5-6402P + Gigabyte Z170 in my case. I am old and therefore can not understand how a system with 16 threads and 32 GB 2400 MHz RAM can perform worser than 16 threads and 16 GB 2933 MHz RAM ***

    As a personal note: generally as consumers when we decide that we need something new, anything actually, but in this case computers, it turns an obsession for us and with each passing day the urge to buy if as soon as possible increases and we get anxious with each passing day until we buy it.

    This happened to me as well, I had to wait for 6 weeks to purchase Ryzen 7 1700 and Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming 5 combination from the same retailer at the same time; and I was anxious as hell during that 6 weeks, I was feeling that I was missing something big.

    Then I purchased it, saw the problems I have not experienced since late 1990's, spent so much time in reinstalling it over and over, even restarting to post on forums about this bad motherboard which I had not done for last 7 years ... I am still experimenting on that Ryzen computer, since 4 weeks, but the thrill is gone. I do not feel anxious anymore, but now I worry if this combination will ever become stable at all. I subsituted one bad feeling with a worser one.

    If you *** ABSOLUTELY NEED TO PURCHASE RYZEN NOW *** then try Asus ROG Crosshair VI Hero. Asus has a proven history of good BIOS engineering and CH6 has more features that can become useful in coming few years, like Clear CMOS button on back of motherboard, front USB 3.1, ready for m.2 wifi cards, and placement of m.2 NVMe port is on the best possible location among alternatives.

    As far as BIOS engineering is concerned, MSI is average but Gigabyte BIOS engineering is a mess nowadays, my Z170 is almost two years old and still has issues in BIOS, as for X370 - I have written so much about its problems. I will definitely not buy Gigabyte for next few desktop builds.


    Hi Been there, done that, got burned (my nickname for you). Your recommendation is most most appreciative. I decided to wait until mid July/August before buying/building a Ryzen 1700 system. I think (with AMD's pressure ) MB manufacturers will need that time to get it right, July will be the month I expect to see complete Ryzen systems on the market. Only then will I expect a presentation of a quality home desktop system. By the way, I am not a gamer, I just want a fast reliable system on which to do coding, programming/ testing and some graphics work. I use Linux and my use would be with the using the Ryzen system for the Linux Desktop.
    Reply to lsatenstein
  7. I'm answering only because I feel there are unfair generalizations made in some replies. This should not mislead other readers. There are a number of very stable motherboard and CPU combinations. The Krait is not one of them. Tom's has not reviewed every single motherboard available, nor has any other site at this time.

    What you can do is be smart... "you" being anyone considering a Ryzen build. Read reviews from newegg to tech sites. Compare them. There are plenty of people having great success with various models. Yes, some fail, that's just the real-world numbers game and you see an influx due to the new state of Ryzen in the market and the flood of new builds.

    I can testify for the ASRock Taichi. I have always used ASUS prior to this build. The Taichi is an amazing board and while it does not have all the USB connections and fancy lights of the ASUS Hero, it's more than adequate and a solid base for the future. You will find great reviews on the Taichi and it will score higher than any other x370 board out there if you compile feedback.

    Further, I did a Windows7 install, on an NVMe M.2, and my RAM, G.SKill Flare-X was recognized at 2400 on the first boot to BIOS... one click and it was at 3200. This has been an easy, stable, robust build and I could not be happier.

    Yes, there are issues and anyone can dig up horror stories. But there are thousands of clean, stable builds being done on many models and combinations. Do your research and make a smart purchase that fits YOUR needs and expectations. You are ultimately responsible for the choices and parts you end up with. Just remember that for every person complaining, 10 others are happily enjoying their new hardware.

    Final comment... I've told over a dozen people here to "wait". Waiting usually means cheaper and more stable. I think that's still true. But don't be willingly blind and ignorant. If you wait, research the market and educate yourself on the best options out there. No excuses. This is on "you"...whoever you are :)
    Reply to Ditt44
  8. Threadripper is slated for September now.

    Look at this clip :'AMD confirmed that its AGESA update for May improves DDR4 memory compatibility, although it also stressed on the need for motherboard manufacturers to improve their board designs in the future, with more PCB layers and better copper traces between the DIMM slots and the SoC socket. '

    https://www.techpowerup.com/233476/amd-talks-improved-ryzen-memory-support-ryzen-3-and-game-optimization

    So, there is a hardware related issue as well.

    Waiting is definitely the best option at this moment.
    Reply to eyupo92
  9. So, waiting will be worth it. According to the below report, Ryzen CPU's will be patched in silicon.

    https://www.techpowerup.com/234476/amd-readies-b2-stepping-of-the-ryzen-summit-ridge-silicon

    "AMD is readying a new stepping of its 14 nm "Summit Ridge" eight-core CPU silicon, which powers its socket AM4 Ryzen processors, according to Canard PC. The new B2 stepping reportedly addresses a lot of hardware-level errata which cannot be fixed merely by AGESA updates. According to Canard PC, the changes seem to be focused on the uncore components of "Summit Ridge." Typically, uncore refers to the integrated northbridge, which includes components such as the memory controllers, PCI-Express root complex, etc.

    If the B2 stepping is mostly focused on uncore-level errata, it could mean improved PCI-Express device support, and perhaps even memory support improvements beyond even what AGESA 1.0.0.6 brings to the table. Canard PC reports that it hasn't come across any CPU core-specific errata being addressed with the B2 stepping. The glaring FMA3-related bug has been patched through BIOS updates, and most newer batches of socket AM4 motherboards come with the patch pre-installed."

    Now, I could start telling that "I told you that software can not solve hardware design problems etc, AMD is to blame here etc"; but according to the reviews released today, Intel's X299 motherboards and CPU's are also have lots of issues.

    The critical part here is that Intel has also moved to a different CPU cache architecture and that new architecture is also performs worser than Core i7-7700K or older X series processors; by releasing this architecture, Intel has effectively validated Ryzen CPU cache design.
    Reply to eyupo92
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