My GPU died, has it killed my Motherboard too?

My computers been having some issues. About two weeks ago, my cheap cases built in fan controller melted, letting out lots of smoke. I didn't think it did any damage to my computer, since it wasnt really connected, so I just moved all the fans over to my motherboards controller and left it.
That is, until the other night, when my pc just randomly turned off while under normal load. Just shut down, no crash. Didn't reboot. I figured it could be a problem with the graphics card, so I pulled that out and plugged my monitor into my motherboard. Viola, works perfectly. So I go to plug my GPU back in, and forgot to put the 2 8 pin power connectors back in, and then I power the system on. I fucked up. The graphics card immediately starts smoking, so I turn the PC off ASAP.
So now, the motherboard still seemingly works, but the graphics card won't output and I'm pretty sure it's fried. I have a new graphics card on hand, but im too scared to put it in. Is my motherboard fried?

MY specs:
CPU: Intel 3570k
Motherboard: MSI Z77A G43
RAM: 12GB assorted sticks
PSU: corsair cx600
Old GPU: MSI 770
7 answers Last reply
More about gpu died killed motherboard
  1. Hmm my guess is your low quality PSU is dying and killing components on the way, not uncommon with low quality units. Yes a psu can kill anything its connected too.
  2. I don't think it's the PSU
  3. GingerBiscuits said:
    I don't think it's the PSU


    Can you elaborate? This appears to be the result of overcurrent which is a PSUs issue. Installing a GFX card without the PCIe supplementary power cables will only result in it not working or being stuck in some low performance mode. It won't result in smoke. The PCIe slot provides up to 75W.

    On a side note Tom does like to keep his forums a bit cleaner than some others. Swearing, cussing, vulgar language and the like should be left outside.

    I'd be talking with Corsair. Yes, it's a good PSU. Not great but good. Fans and GFX cards melting isn't something that should happen(Thanks to Capt. Obvious). One catastrophic failure is bad enough. 2 means Corsair should be held accountable.
  4. I agree that it sounds like the PSU is probably at fault. I would not install your new GPU in the computer. Is this one of the older CX 600 PSUs? They are a fairly low quality unit. A fan controller should not melt, and a GPU without the supplementary power cables connected should not go up in smoke.
  5. aquielisunari said:
    GingerBiscuits said:
    I don't think it's the PSU


    Can you elaborate? This appears to be the result of overcurrent which is a PSUs issue. Installing a GFX card without the PCIe supplementary power cables will only result in it not working or being stuck in some low performance mode. It won't result in smoke. The PCIe slot provides up to 75W.

    On a side note Tom does like to keep his forums a bit cleaner than some others. Swearing, cussing, vulgar language and the like should be left outside.

    I'd be talking with Corsair. Yes, it's a good PSU. Not great but good. Fans and GFX cards melting isn't something that should happen(Thanks to Capt. Obvious). One catastrophic failure is bad enough. 2 means Corsair should be held accountable.


    Sorry, I should have been less vague. I accidentally short circuited the fan controller while trying to fix a broken fan, which caused it to chain reaction and melt (I'm really not very smart). Also, the graphics card wasnt hooked up to the psu when it started smoking, only the motherboard. I assumed that it would do no damage, but obviously I was wrong. At this point I only want to know if you think my motherboard has died, or whether the short circuit has done some form of damage to the PSU which is causing it to incrementally fail.
    Sorry about the language too, I was just a bit frustrated.
  6. GingerBiscuits said:
    aquielisunari said:
    GingerBiscuits said:
    I don't think it's the PSU


    Can you elaborate? This appears to be the result of overcurrent which is a PSUs issue. Installing a GFX card without the PCIe supplementary power cables will only result in it not working or being stuck in some low performance mode. It won't result in smoke. The PCIe slot provides up to 75W.

    On a side note Tom does like to keep his forums a bit cleaner than some others. Swearing, cussing, vulgar language and the like should be left outside.

    I'd be talking with Corsair. Yes, it's a good PSU. Not great but good. Fans and GFX cards melting isn't something that should happen(Thanks to Capt. Obvious). One catastrophic failure is bad enough. 2 means Corsair should be held accountable.


    Sorry, I should have been less vague. I accidentally short circuited the fan controller while trying to fix a broken fan, which caused it to chain reaction and melt (I'm really not very smart). Also, the graphics card wasnt hooked up to the psu when it started smoking, only the motherboard. I assumed that it would do no damage, but obviously I was wrong. At this point I only want to know if you think my motherboard has died, or whether the short circuit has done some form of damage to the PSU which is causing it to incrementally fail.
    Sorry about the language too, I was just a bit frustrated.


    It was hooked up to the PSU. Just wanted to make that clear. The PCIe slot does provide it power and where does that power come from?

    PErsonally I wouldn't trust either piece of hardware due to the short circuit. Johnny 5 is on his way out. The GFX card was obviously fed some bad food which certain safety features built into the PSU should have prevented. WHo knows what these electrical issues have done to the motherboard. However my financial adviser(goes by the name Wallet) wouldn't really allow me to purchase a new PSU and motherboard all at once. As such I would replace the PSU first.

    Does the board have an hdmi or other video out connector? After a new PSU is connected I would try that first. Then a gfx card.
  7. aquielisunari said:
    GingerBiscuits said:
    aquielisunari said:
    GingerBiscuits said:
    I don't think it's the PSU


    Can you elaborate? This appears to be the result of overcurrent which is a PSUs issue. Installing a GFX card without the PCIe supplementary power cables will only result in it not working or being stuck in some low performance mode. It won't result in smoke. The PCIe slot provides up to 75W.

    On a side note Tom does like to keep his forums a bit cleaner than some others. Swearing, cussing, vulgar language and the like should be left outside.

    I'd be talking with Corsair. Yes, it's a good PSU. Not great but good. Fans and GFX cards melting isn't something that should happen(Thanks to Capt. Obvious). One catastrophic failure is bad enough. 2 means Corsair should be held accountable.


    Sorry, I should have been less vague. I accidentally short circuited the fan controller while trying to fix a broken fan, which caused it to chain reaction and melt (I'm really not very smart). Also, the graphics card wasnt hooked up to the psu when it started smoking, only the motherboard. I assumed that it would do no damage, but obviously I was wrong. At this point I only want to know if you think my motherboard has died, or whether the short circuit has done some form of damage to the PSU which is causing it to incrementally fail.
    Sorry about the language too, I was just a bit frustrated.


    It was hooked up to the PSU. Just wanted to make that clear. The PCIe slot does provide it power and where does that power come from?

    PErsonally I wouldn't trust either piece of hardware due to the short circuit. Johnny 5 is on his way out. The GFX card was obviously fed some bad food which certain safety features built into the PSU should have prevented. WHo knows what these electrical issues have done to the motherboard. However my financial adviser(goes by the name Wallet) wouldn't really allow me to purchase a new PSU and motherboard all at once. As such I would replace the PSU first.

    Does the board have an hdmi or other video out connector? After a new PSU is connected I would try that first. Then a gfx card.


    The PC still runs, with my monitors connected to the DVI and HDMI out on the board. I just don't trust the PCIe slots on the board.
    Anyway, thanks for the advice.
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