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Will my psu operate normally after the upgrade?

Hello, i have this PSU... I was wondering if i could upgrade my computer and buy this motherboard along with this cpu.Will my psu hold that?
More info:
GPU : ASUS GTX 950 STRIX 2GB (Information about gpu)
2 HDD
1 DVD-ROM
Thanks :)
30 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about psu operate upgrade
  1. How old is the PSU?

    It's far from the best, and I'd suggest replacing it..... but you are looking at a pretty light power requirement in the proposed build.

    Also, keep in the mind you may need a BIOS update to get the H110 board to run with the KabyLake i5-7400
  2. Yes, you'll be fine with that. Your GPU will take 'up to 150 watts', and processor is 65 watts. Mobo is negligible, as it doesn't have any funky LEDs or anything.
  3. The PSU is like... 1 year old
  4. Bios update...well..
  5. Which mobo should i buy? ddr3, is it difficult to update the bios?
  6. kaptainkuftic said:
    Yes, you'll be fine with that. Your GPU will take 'up to 150 watts', and processor is 65 watts. Mobo is negligible, as it doesn't have any funky LEDs or anything.


    GPU is only max 90W (a little over in real-world use), CPU is 65W and the mobo can be up to 60W...... not exactly negligible.

    Paired with DDR3 (OP, make sure you're using DDR3*L*....ie 1.35V or you risk damage) and HDDs etc, that's a theoretical max of <300W.

    That being said though, the PSU is far from the best..... and that's probably right on the cusp of what I'd be comfortable running on it. PErsonally, I'd replace it.

    GeorgeMoustakas said:
    Which mobo should i buy? ddr3, is it difficult to update the bios?


    IF the BIOS needs updated (some boards are shipping with newer BIOS versions now), it's impossible to update without a compatible (in this case Skylake) CPU.

    I mentioned DDR3 above....... you need DDR3L to avoid any risk of damage.
    Skylake/KabyLake officially support DDR4 and DDR3L (1.35V) not 'standard' DDR3 (1.5V)
  7. I will replace it but not now :p...soo...which motherboard should i buy without upgrading the bios?because im afraid of any mistakes that could destroy the pc :P
  8. GeorgeMoustakas said:
    I will replace it but not now :p...soo...which motherboard should i buy without upgrading the bios?because im afraid of any mistakes that could destroy the pc :P


    You won't find any that are officially compatible out of the box that support DDR3.

    B250 and H270 will both support the chip out of the box, but need DDR4.
  9. Quote:
    and the mobo can be up to 60W...... not exactly negligible.


    Seeing as the bulk of the NB is now on the CPU, all that's left on the board is basically the SB or ICH/MCH. (or whatever it's called now.) There is no way a modern motherboard uses 60W. The power draw for the system is 225W or even less. If the PSU is 5yo he should be fine to use it.

    I do agree that he should be looking for a newer board. I wouldn't try to find one that uses DDR3L. Just move to DDR4. Get a B250 that uses DDR4 and you should be fine.
  10. Because i need to upgrade my CPU and i dont have more money to buy ram, is that cpu good/worth buying?
  11. What CPU do you have now? 4460 is sort of a lower end CPU and might not really be faster than what you have already.
  12. Intel Core i5 3450
  13. So which motherboard would you suggest me buying in order to upgrade to 7th generation i5 skylake?
  14. If you buy the 4460 you are basically getting the same level CPU, just with a newer core. It won't really be much of an upgrade. Instead of buying that board and CPU, why not spend all your money on a CPU? A 3570K should be worth it, and you can OC it to make it even faster.
  15. I dont know if my motherboard can hold that.. this is my motherboard , actually it can but what about the difference between mine?Is that worth buying?
  16. It's a lower end board due to the H61 chipset. But you should be ok to use the 3570K. You won't be able to OC it though. If you look at the CPU support list it shows the 3570 and 3770(K) as supported CPUs.
  17. Is it worth buying?
  18. Not sure. You haven't gave us full system specs in an easy to read manor, nor have you told us why you are looking to upgrade. I mostly posted to point out that motherboards DON'T use 60W by themselves. The 3570K or 3770 is a pretty good CPU to have for gaming. The recommended CPU for most AAA games coming out is the 3770. If you can find one of those for cheap I'd get it. I did a couple of years ago and things have been good for me. Considering you can't OC the 3570 I'm less sure it's worth buying.
  19. Problem is that the 3570k is not available in Greece...
  20. 4745454b said:
    Quote:
    and the mobo can be up to 60W...... not exactly negligible.


    Seeing as the bulk of the NB is now on the CPU, all that's left on the board is basically the SB or ICH/MCH. (or whatever it's called now.) There is no way a modern motherboard uses 60W.


    The official spec for the board is up to 60W. While I agree that's highly, highly unlikely in any real-world usage.....it's still theoretically possible.
  21. Best answer
    Link/proof? I read the like to his board that the OP provided, I don't see anything like that.

    http://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/asus-z97-a-and-z97-deluxe-motherboard-review,10.html

    Here is a site testing the ENTIRE system. At idle the ENTIRE system is drawing 62W. ~10W of that is the GPU, and I'm not sure what the CPU draw is at idle. Considering they said they are testing the ENTIRE system they are using a kill a watt device to give them draw from the wall plug so you need to take PSU efficiency into account as well. (Meaning the draw from the system is even less.) If the PC is really drawing ~50-55W, and 25W of that is CPU, 10W is the GPU, and you have a couple of ram sticks (5W) drive drawing another 5W, etc there just isn't any way for a board to draw 60W. It only has the SB and a few other chips to power. I would be shocked if a board, more so an H61 board like the OPs, to draw more then 15W. It just isn't possible.
  22. This thread is all over the place.

    Buying in Greece will affect the prices and the budget.

    Spending a lot on old tech, will help for a little while but then you will be in the same situation again.

    My 2 cents, you should be looking at new tech, a 7th gen intel, with a B250 motherboard, and DDR4 RAM and sort out any PSU issues.

    If you can, save some more, and go that route.
  23. 4745454b said:
    Link/proof? I read the like to his board that the OP provided, I don't see anything like that.

    http://www.guru3d.com/articles-pages/asus-z97-a-and-z97-deluxe-motherboard-review,10.html

    I would be shocked if a board, more so an H61 board like the OPs, to draw more then 15W. It just isn't possible.


    Sorry, I was talking the GA-H110M-S2V DDR3 linked in the initial post (not that it should matter too much).

    While I totally agree anything >10-15W seems excessive, I could've sworn I read the 60W max on Gigabytes site earlier, but can't find it now..... was just trawling through the manual, but can't find where I saw it. Maybe I'm going crazy.

    Incidentally, PCPP show 15-60W and, while that's not always a 100% reliable number...... it must've come from somewhere? So, maybe I did see it somewhere....and I'm not going crazy :lol:



    Either way, wasn't looking to derail the thread.
  24. You aren't the only person who says these things. The other day I was dealing with someone who believes in 50W harddrives. 12V power they are around 9W, total around 12W. I tend to stay with measured or manufacturer stated numbers. Calculators give bad results to make up for sub standard PSUs.

    Quote:
    This thread is all over the place.

    Buying in Greece will affect the prices and the budget.

    Spending a lot on old tech, will help for a little while but then you will be in the same situation again.

    My 2 cents, you should be looking at new tech, a 7th gen intel, with a B250 motherboard, and DDR4 RAM and sort out any PSU issues.


    I totally agree. If the budget doesn't allow for a total system upgrade then you have to make due with what you have. At the moment a 3570 or even better 3770 will do great for gaming. Might not be great for 4K or Eyefinity setups, but for 1080 gaming I find it hard to see where the 3770 won't cut it. And he still has the PCIe 3.0 16x slot for a good video card. If the budget allows for it he should upgrade his system. But if you don't have the funds then you don't have the funds.
  25. Barty1884 said:
    4745454b said:
    Quote:
    and the mobo can be up to 60W...... not exactly negligible.


    Seeing as the bulk of the NB is now on the CPU, all that's left on the board is basically the SB or ICH/MCH. (or whatever it's called now.) There is no way a modern motherboard uses 60W.


    The official spec for the board is up to 60W. While I agree that's highly, highly unlikely in any real-world usage.....it's still theoretically possible.


    The power of the board is basically dependent on the power of the CPU, since the board's main job is to regulate power for the CPU. If the board is 80% efficient at this and the CPU is drawing 80W then the board power can be somewhere around like 20W. And I'm pretty sure most are more than 80% efficient, like quite more. Then there's a teeny bit of power for things like the built-in audio as well as the chipset and stuff. But from what I've seen it's rare to see a motherboard in a modern system pull more than 20W, most are probably like 10W. Plus most CPUs today use like 50W under load for the most part. I recall the I5-6600K review on Toms and when gaming it's like 52W max, even lower than its rated TDP. And AMD is very efficient, too, now.

    I don't know how pcpartpicker comes up with their numbers but I feel they sort of just make them up.
  26. Quote:
    The power of the board is basically dependent on the power of the CPU, since the board's main job is to regulate power for the CPU. If the board is 80% efficient at this and the CPU is drawing 80W then the board power can be somewhere around like 20W. And I'm pretty sure most are more than 80% efficient, like quite more. Then there's a teeny bit of power for things like the built-in audio as well as the chipset and stuff. But from what I've seen it's rare to see a motherboard in a modern system pull more than 20W, most are probably like 10W. Plus most CPUs today use like 50W under load for the most part. I recall the I5-6600K review on Toms and when gaming it's like 52W max, even lower than its rated TDP. And AMD is very efficient, too, now.

    I don't know how pcpartpicker comes up with their numbers but I feel they sort of just make them up.


    I don't even know where to start. And the sad thing is that post has been edited. Never in my life have I seen "efficiency" numbers for a motherboard. The power draw for a board IS the "teeny bit of power for things like the built-in audio as well as the chipset". And there are tons of CPUs that use more than 50W, including the FX line that AMD is retiring. Turkey, please don't confuse an issue.
  27. The board includes DC-DC converters for powering the CPU - it draws its power at ~1V, not the 12V the PSU supplies.

    These converters are typically ~95% efficient, because there's no requirement for isolation, rectification, smoothing, or many of the other things a mains PSU has to do.
  28. 4745454b said:
    Quote:
    The power of the board is basically dependent on the power of the CPU, since the board's main job is to regulate power for the CPU. If the board is 80% efficient at this and the CPU is drawing 80W then the board power can be somewhere around like 20W. And I'm pretty sure most are more than 80% efficient, like quite more. Then there's a teeny bit of power for things like the built-in audio as well as the chipset and stuff. But from what I've seen it's rare to see a motherboard in a modern system pull more than 20W, most are probably like 10W. Plus most CPUs today use like 50W under load for the most part. I recall the I5-6600K review on Toms and when gaming it's like 52W max, even lower than its rated TDP. And AMD is very efficient, too, now.

    I don't know how pcpartpicker comes up with their numbers but I feel they sort of just make them up.


    I don't even know where to start. And the sad thing is that post has been edited. Never in my life have I seen "efficiency" numbers for a motherboard. The power draw for a board IS the "teeny bit of power for things like the built-in audio as well as the chipset". And there are tons of CPUs that use more than 50W, including the FX line that AMD is retiring. Turkey, please don't confuse an issue.


    My post was agreeing with you. There is no sadness in me editing my post, I have a tendency to make typos or add another thought or two after I submit my post.

    What Someone Somewhere said is primarily what I was talking about, that's why the VRMs have heatsinks, the VRMs get hotter than everything else on the motherboard because of the converting of 12V to whatever voltage is set in the BIOS. I just didn't know the exact number but now I do since Someone Somewhere has provided it. So if that's 95% efficient, then the VRMs will actually only be about 4W going by the math. Motherboards will at least use enough power to require VRM heatsinks on the higher-end ones, which is only necessary really when you are using a higher power CPU since more CPU power = more motherboard power.

    And what I'm talking about is the power consumption of modern day CPUs when gaming. Most people aren't torture-testing their CPUs all the time. When gaming with Ryzen and Kabylake things are kept quite low. And low CPU power = lower motherboard power (which was why I was agreeing with you in the first place).
  29. Quote:
    Motherboards will at least use enough power to require VRMs on the higher-end ones, which is only necessary really when you are using a higher power CPU since more CPU power = more motherboard power.

    Nooooo? You'll need VRMs no matter what, otherwise your CPU gets either 0V or 12V. Perhaps you mean VRM heatsinks?

    That 95% number is a general number for a typical non-isolated buck converter of reasonable quality. Running at really low voltages like that could impact the efficiency, as could the emphasis on really smooth power over efficiency.
  30. Someone Somewhere said:
    Quote:
    Motherboards will at least use enough power to require VRMs on the higher-end ones, which is only necessary really when you are using a higher power CPU since more CPU power = more motherboard power.

    Nooooo? You'll need VRMs no matter what, otherwise your CPU gets either 0V or 12V. Perhaps you mean VRM heatsinks?

    That 95% number is a general number for a typical non-isolated buck converter of reasonable quality. Running at really low voltages like that could impact the efficiency, as could the emphasis on really smooth power over efficiency.


    Yeah I meant heatsinks.
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