Took boot SSD out of machine after cloning OS to HDD - Boot is now excessively slow (5+ mins)

Hi guys,

I have an old computer which I am passing on to someone else. It originally had a Samsung 250GB SSD boot drive which I would prefer to keep. So naturally, I got an old 500GB Seagate Barracuda drive which I had knocking about and cloned the OS and its respective partitions from the SSD over to the HDD using Aomei Free.

The issue is that the boot and program load times are now excessively long. I am aware that I have dropped down from an SSD to a 7200RPM HDD and therefore should expect a significant drop in performance - but I am experiencing 5+ minute boot times on the HDD now, with a very lightly loaded OS (only chrome browser and a few small similar miscellaneous programs are additional to the OS).

The HDD has no issues and all sectors are confirmed healthy. Anyone experience something like this previously who may have an idea on how I can improve this? I would like this resolved before I pass the machine on to my friend so it doesn't take away from his experience. Any and all suggestions welcome.

System Specs:

i3 2120
Biostar MoBo - Sata 2
8GB Ram (DDR3 1333MHz)
500GB Seagate Barracuda HDD (Previously Samsung SSD)
Integrator 500W 80+ Bronze PSU
GTX 750ti

Note: Once loaded, actual in program performance in on par with how it was previously.

Thanks in advance!
7 answers Last reply
More about boot ssd machine cloning hdd boot excessively slow mins
  1. Did you make any changes in the BIOS? Is the HDD now boot priority #1?
  2. If you are passing this system on to someone else, you really, really need to do a full wipe and reinstall of the OS.

    And...you can't keep the OS license that is/was on the SSD at the same time.
  3. Barty1884 said:
    Did you make any changes in the BIOS? Is the HDD now boot priority #1?


    Hi Barty, thanks for the reply. Yes, the HDD has been selected as boot priority No.1
  4. USAFRet said:
    If you are passing this system on to someone else, you really, really need to do a full wipe and reinstall of the OS.

    And...you can't keep the OS license that is/was on the SSD at the same time.


    Hi USAF! Thanks for the reply.
    I appreciate that is the ideal - but the OS really had nothing but Chrome, PDF viewer and a few pdf documents on it (having done a reinstall of the system about 2 months prior to today).
    I appreciate the license issue so the SSD has already been wiped.
  5. nk211988 said:
    USAFRet said:
    If you are passing this system on to someone else, you really, really need to do a full wipe and reinstall of the OS.

    And...you can't keep the OS license that is/was on the SSD at the same time.


    Hi USAF! Thanks for the reply.
    I appreciate that is the ideal - but the OS really had nothing but Chrome, PDF viewer and a few pdf documents on it (having done a reinstall of the system about 2 months prior to today).
    I appreciate the license issue so the SSD has already been wiped.


    Before passing on any used system with the OS, full wipe and reinstall.
    After receiving any used system with an OS, full wipe and reinstall.

    Always. Yes, both parties need to do this...just in case.
  6. zinoub said:
    1. Download Windows Performance Toolkit https://developer.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/hardware/windows-assessment-deployment-kit

    2. Take a boot trace using Windows Performance Recorder (WPR). Find here a tutorial https://zinetek.wordpress.com/2015/12/16/how-to-use-wpr-to-record-boot-sequence/

    3. Share your boot trace for analysis.

    Windows Performance Toolkit is used by the Microsoft Support team for troubleshooting Performance issues.



    Thanks Zinoub,

    I am in work for the day now but will give this a shot this evening and post the analysis.
  7. Hi guys,

    Thanks for the suggestions above. It seems the BIOS had swapped itself to IDE instead of AHCI. Id did the following to resolve it should anyone else have similar issues

    Right-click the Windows Start Menu. Choose Command Prompt (Admin).
    Type this command and press ENTER: bcdedit /set {current} safeboot minimal
    Restart the computer and enter BIOS Setup (the key to press varies between systems).
    Change the SATA Operation mode to AHCI from either IDE or RAID (again, the language varies).
    Save changes and exit Setup and Windows will automatically boot to Safe Mode.
    Right-click the Windows Start Menu once more. Choose Command Prompt (Admin).
    Type this command and press ENTER: bcdedit /deletevalue {current} safeboot
    Reboot once more and Windows will automatically start with AHCI drivers enabled.

    Please note : while the above worked for me I have seen it cause issues for others, where they had varying degrees of issues (even systems as far gone as no longer being able to access the BIOS). Make sure you have everything appropriately backed up and your recovery media in place before starting.

    Boot times dropped from 5+ mins down to about 30 - 40 seconds, which I think is acceptable for a 7200RPM drive. OS feels sharper and once system has cached, opening programs is smooth.

    Thanks again for the previous suggestions.
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