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Building a $2000 PC, please review my parts list.

Original plan was to buy a cyberpower pc for around $2000 but everyone keeps telling me to build my own. So, I'm following the same build as the cyberpower one, only putting in a few better parts since I'm building it.

Let me know if there are any big holes in my build or if there is anything way out of wack.

Also there is currently a sale on the pny gtx 1080 ti xlr8

It is $633 is it worth saving the $100 to choose it over a evga SC2?

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rwwMHN

PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rwwMHN
Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rwwMHN/by_merchant/

CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($326.32 @ OutletPC)
CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
Motherboard: ASRock - Z270 Killer SLI/ac ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($133.98 @ Newegg)
Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($126.99 @ Amazon)
Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($127.88 @ OutletPC)
Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99 @ Amazon)
Video Card: PNY - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB XLR8 Gaming OC Video Card ($633.99 @ Dell Small Business)
Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($179.99 @ Amazon)
Power Supply: Corsair - 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($149.99 @ Amazon)
Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Amazon)
Total: $1962.01
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 15:21 EDT-0400
24 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about building 2000 future proofing review parts list
  1. Here is the list:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($326.32 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i GTX 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Corsair)
    Motherboard: Asus - MAXIMUS IX HERO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($229.00 @ B&H)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($129.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($127.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.44 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Asus - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB STRIX GAMING Video Card ($784.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Corsair - Crystal 460X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($129.99 @ B&H)
    Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 850W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($119.99 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $2089.57
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 15:36 EDT-0400

    A good looking and complete RGB Themed build with extremely high quality components.
  2. If you want a future proof $2000 build you should start with the X299 as its the only Intel motherboard we are sure has a future. Also the 1080ti only needs a 600W power supply but a 650W is ideal head room for overclocking the 6 core intel. Looks like B&H is the only one that has this1080ti ATM so may not last long.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i7-7800X 3.5GHz 6-Core Processor ($440.00 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-U12S 55.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($57.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: ASRock - Fatal1ty X299 Gaming K6 ATX LGA2066 Motherboard ($242.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (4 x 4GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($127.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($48.44 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC Black Edition Video Card ($719.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Corsair - Crystal 460X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($129.99 @ B&H)
    Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.89 @ OutletPC)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $2080.14
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 15:54 EDT-0400
  3. This build is much better imo
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - B350 GAMING PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard ($98.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($126.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 500GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($234.00 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB FTW3 GAMING iCX Video Card ($779.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Phanteks - ECLIPSE P400 TEMPERED GLASS ATX Mid Tower Case ($85.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($88.17 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1896.98
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 16:23 EDT-0400
  4. 1. Why would you go for X299? The cost is simply not justified. X299 is more for content creation than it is for gaming.
    2. And also why would you go for a lower end R5 and not at least an R7? That does not make sense.
    3. There is really no such thing as "future proofing" because you can't predict what kind of hardware is available 5 years from now, and you can't predict what games are going to require 5 years from now.

    I would get this - 1080TI, R7, and it comes with a Windows license:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H5 Universal 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($46.99 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Motherboard: Asus - STRIX X370-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($200.33 @ B&H)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($160.98 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($127.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - BLACK SERIES 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($116.45 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC Black Edition Video Card ($719.99 @ B&H)
    Case: NZXT - S340 Elite (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($94.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA - SuperNOVA G2 750W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($99.99 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1955.08
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 16:34 EDT-0400
  5. Cnconrad said:
    Original plan was to buy a cyberpower pc for around $2000 but everyone keeps telling me to build my own. So, I'm following the same build as the cyberpower one, only putting in a few better parts since I'm building it.

    Let me know if there are any big holes in my build or if there is anything way out of wack.

    Also there is currently a sale on the pny gtx 1080 ti xlr8

    It is $633 is it worth saving the $100 to choose it over a evga SC2?

    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rwwMHN

    PCPartPicker part list: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rwwMHN
    Price breakdown by merchant: https://pcpartpicker.com/list/rwwMHN/by_merchant/

    CPU: Intel - Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz Quad-Core Processor ($326.32 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - Z270 Killer SLI/ac ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($133.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($126.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($127.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: PNY - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB XLR8 Gaming OC Video Card ($633.99 @ Dell Small Business)
    Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($179.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Corsair - 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($149.99 @ Amazon)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1962.01
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 15:21 EDT-0400


    The main thing I see is the video card you should buy what you need for the monitor resolution and refresh rate.
    That is the worst place to try to future proof what you buy today for 700 bucks can usually be replaced in ca couple years with a better card for less money.
  6. First off, future proofing is, not a real thing, mostly just a waste of money.
    But, I feel this is more future proof, without wasting too much money on unnecessary hardware like an overly fancy case. AM4 has a longer life than Intel's new chipset every two year deal. The motherboard is very high end though, so it should support any new AM4 CPUs that come out. The Cooler will be good for any CPU you want to put in there as well, and likely will perform better than the liquid cooler anyways. If you needed to add more ram it shouldn't be dificult, BUT mixing ram kits is always like a 50/50 chance of them working together even when they're the same model. The m.2 SSD is large, but you shouldn't need to expand for a long time as long as you clear out your downloads folder regularly, and uninstall games you don't play. The 1080ti is going to be outpaced by the 1180 when it comes out in a year and a half to two years, so I'm not super keen on spending that much money it. GPUs kinda have the shortest lifespan of anything in the system. The case will allow you to show off a bit but also make it easy to organize your parts and expand for more storage easily as well if you need to add some HDDs for long term storage, and should be pretty easy to build in as well as cable manage. The PSU is just all around solid and will last you a decade or more, as it has a 12 year warranty, and enough watts to expand as much as you want. (save the extra cables).
    The windows copy is more expensive, but it's the Retail edition, which means you can reinstall it basically as many times as you want on as many computers as want, also it comes on a USB already.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 3 67.8 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($83.78 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - X370 XPOWER GAMING TITANIUM ATX AM4 Motherboard ($261.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($162.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Crucial - MX300 1.1TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($279.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB SC2 Gaming iCX Video Card ($569.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterCase Pro 5 ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - PRIME Platinum 650W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($128.09 @ SuperBiiz)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit ($104.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1986.29
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 16:50 EDT-0400
  7. I do not see any reason to get an amd processor. I have had amd products in the past and have been disappointed.

    Guys, most of these suggestions are for a completely different computer. In several cases it appears that they are just different machines for the same price.

    I appreciate the effort, but I am looking at this build. I am not looking to throw in with amd or downgrade the GPU.
    I have from everything I have read, a fantastic ssd and a 3 tb HDD why are people suggesting a single 1 tb SSD?


    @g-unit111 you have the same basic build as mine, but it changed several things without changing the price any. I remember from a past thread you are a fan of the fan cooler on the CPU but it looks awfully clunky hanging off of the motherboard and the h100i has thousands of good reviews from what I have seen.


    As far as Future proofing, my last PC lasted 7+ years and can still perform on medium detail in most games.

    I'm looking for that level or better of future proofing.

    I picked the case because I like the looks and amount of fan slots/airflow.


    Does anyone have any opinions on the pny 1080ti graphics card for $630? Multiple people are suggesting cards $100-$150 more expensive. Pcworld says the pny tests comparable to the egva SC2.
  8. Cnconrad said:
    I do not see any reason to get an amd processor. I have had amd products in the past and have been disappointed. .


    I think I said in your last thread that the current generation of AMD CPUs is some of the best they've ever produced and most graphs show that they come within a few FPS of most of their Intel counterparts. The R5-1600 is currently outselling the i5-7600K.

    Quote:
    Guys, most of these suggestions are for a completely different computer. In several cases it appears that they are just different machines for the same price. Guys, most of these suggestions are for a completely different computer. In several cases it appears that they are just different machines for the same price.


    Yeah you tend to see a lot of that around here. I wouldn't take it personally. Most users here are very passionate about the hardware they own and use on a regular basis.

    Quote:
    @g-unit111 you have the same basic build as mine, but it changed several things without changing the price any. I remember from a past thread you are a fan of the fan cooler on the CPU but it looks awfully clunky hanging off of the motherboard and the h100i has thousands of good reviews from what I have seen. @g-unit111 you have the same basic build as mine, but it changed several things without changing the price any. I remember from a past thread you are a fan of the fan cooler on the CPU but it looks awfully clunky hanging off of the motherboard and the h100i has thousands of good reviews from what I have seen.


    Again, don't read too much into store reviews. The trend seems to be leaning toward CLLs these days, and it's mainly more for aesthetics than anything else. For the most part, a solid air cooler like a D14 will overclock about the same level as a Corsair H100i, and a cooler like the Cryorig H5 will overclock about the same as a Corsair H60. But if you do more research beyond the store reviews, CLLs can be a lot clunkier and more prone to error than any air fan you can buy. I personally go for the fail safe, because I generally prefer my coolers to be more practical than to look pretty.

    Quote:
    As far as Future proofing, my last PC lasted 7+ years and can still perform on medium detail in most games.

    I'm looking for that level or better of future proofing.

    I picked the case because I like the looks and amount of fan slots/airflow.
    As far as Future proofing, my last PC lasted 7+ years and can still perform on medium detail in most games. I'm looking for that level or better of future proofing. I picked the case because I like the looks and amount of fan slots/airflow.


    Does "future proofing" include a monitor upgrade? What kind of monitor do you run now and are you planning to buy a new one in the future? And if so what resolution do you plan to use?

    Quote:
    Does anyone have any opinions on the pny 1080ti graphics card for $630? Multiple people are suggesting cards $100-$150 more expensive. Pcworld says the pny tests comparable to the egva SC2. Does anyone have any opinions on the pny 1080ti graphics card for $630? Multiple people are suggesting cards $100-$150 more expensive. Pcworld says the pny tests comparable to the egva SC2.


    I won't say PNY is horrible, but they're decent. I would personally rather go for something from MSI, Asus, or EVGA - much better cooling systems.
  9. Cnconrad said:
    I do not see any reason to get an amd processor. I have had amd products in the past and have been disappointed.

    Guys, most of these suggestions are for a completely different computer. In several cases it appears that they are just different machines for the same price.

    I appreciate the effort, but I am looking at this build. I am not looking to throw in with amd or downgrade the GPU.
    I have from everything I have read, a fantastic ssd and a 3 tb HDD why are people suggesting a single 1 tb SSD?


    @g-unit111 you have the same basic build as mine, but it changed several things without changing the price any. I remember from a past thread you are a fan of the fan cooler on the CPU but it looks awfully clunky hanging off of the motherboard and the h100i has thousands of good reviews from what I have seen.


    As far as Future proofing, my last PC lasted 7+ years and can still perform on medium detail in most games.

    I'm looking for that level or better of future proofing.

    I picked the case because I like the looks and amount of fan slots/airflow.


    Does anyone have any opinions on the pny 1080ti graphics card for $630? Multiple people are suggesting cards $100-$150 more expensive. Pcworld says the pny tests comparable to the egva SC2.

    The pny 1080ti was out of stock is why I change to the one I was suggesting. Now Dell has it for $699. The 1151 only supports 4 cores and Intels next gen has a 6 core so future proof wise the X299 may be the only route. With my build you could drop down to the 7740K on the X299 and save about $100 and get about a 200Mhz higher overclock. Then use your 3TB. Intel added both the 7640k and 7740k and made the X299 kind of a merky gaming build also if you wish to go with the new motherboards.
  10. James Mason said:
    First off, future proofing is, not a real thing, mostly just a waste of money.
    But, I feel this is more future proof, without wasting too much money on unnecessary hardware like an overly fancy case. AM4 has a longer life than Intel's new chipset every two year deal. The motherboard is very high end though, so it should support any new AM4 CPUs that come out. The Cooler will be good for any CPU you want to put in there as well, and likely will perform better than the liquid cooler anyways. If you needed to add more ram it shouldn't be dificult, BUT mixing ram kits is always like a 50/50 chance of them working together even when they're the same model. The m.2 SSD is large, but you shouldn't need to expand for a long time as long as you clear out your downloads folder regularly, and uninstall games you don't play. The 1080ti is going to be outpaced by the 1180 when it comes out in a year and a half to two years, so I'm not super keen on spending that much money it. GPUs kinda have the shortest lifespan of anything in the system. The case will allow you to show off a bit but also make it easy to organize your parts and expand for more storage easily as well if you need to add some HDDs for long term storage, and should be pretty easy to build in as well as cable manage. The PSU is just all around solid and will last you a decade or more, as it has a 12 year warranty, and enough watts to expand as much as you want. (save the extra cables).
    The windows copy is more expensive, but it's the Retail edition, which means you can reinstall it basically as many times as you want on as many computers as want, also it comes on a USB already.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($294.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    CPU Cooler: be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 3 67.8 CFM Fluid Dynamic Bearing CPU Cooler ($83.78 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - X370 XPOWER GAMING TITANIUM ATX AM4 Motherboard ($261.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($162.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Crucial - MX300 1.1TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($279.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB SC2 Gaming iCX Video Card ($569.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterCase Pro 5 ATX Mid Tower Case ($99.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - PRIME Platinum 650W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($128.09 @ SuperBiiz)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home Full - USB 32/64-bit ($104.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1986.29
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-05 16:50 EDT-0400


    me likes seasonic prime builds.

    would swap the cpu cooler out for a cryorig a40 ultimate
  11. superninja12 said:

    me likes seasonic prime builds.

    would swap the cpu cooler out for a cryorig a40 ultimate


    Awfully more expensive for similar cooling performance though.
    Like 2x the price.
  12. superninja12 said:
    me likes seasonic prime builds.

    would swap the cpu cooler out for a cryorig a40 ultimate


    If I was in the market for a new PSU I'd totally get a Seasonic Prime.
  13. James Mason said:
    superninja12 said:

    me likes seasonic prime builds.

    would swap the cpu cooler out for a cryorig a40 ultimate


    Awfully more expensive for similar cooling performance though.
    Like 2x the price.


    sure but for 2k...
  14. Having trouble quoting you g-unit.

    Could you point me to some positive air cooler articles. Even in "stress test" builds and nearly every benchmark test I have seen it seems like EVERY reviewer used a h100i

    We talked a bit about psu's in my last thread, would you say Seasonic Prime is better than the Corsair I picked, I definitely want a fully modular.


    As far as monitor's go I have 2 pretty nice Dell 22" 1080 60hz I was thinking about picking up a third one they are pretty cheap and running 3 monitor setup at 1080 right now. I realize a 1080 to is super overkill for that but like I said I have the money to do it and it would be nice to go straight out of the box maxing everything until I decide to buy a VR system assuming they take off. I do not see the point in saving 2-300 and buying a 1070 and finding out in 2 years it will struggle running vr.
  15. I like the first 3 lists, not a AMD fan, but would get the strix 1080 ti instead like they say, not sure if I would go for the x299 unless I was getting the higher end stuff like the 10 core version. nice build though
  16. Cnconrad said:
    Having trouble quoting you g-unit.

    Could you point me to some positive air cooler articles. Even in "stress test" builds and nearly every benchmark test I have seen it seems like EVERY reviewer used a h100i


    Hmm, I'll have to check around and get back to you on that one. One of the reasons I emphasize air cooling over liquid is the cost factor. Right now an NZXT Kraken X62 runs $170, a Cryorig A80 runs $159, and a Corsair H100i runs around $130 - $140. A Noctua D15 is literally 1/2 the cost with almost the exact same overclocking performance as a liquid cooler.

    Quote:
    We talked a bit about psu's in my last thread, would you say Seasonic Prime is better than the Corsair I picked, I definitely want a fully modular.


    Every manufacturer, Corsair, Seasonic, and EVGA included has tons of different units good and bad. Corsair's best units are the AXi and HXi. Their worst are the CX. EVGA's best units are the G2/P2/T2 and their worst are the B and W series. Seasonic's best are the Prime series, as well as the X series.

    Quote:
    As far as monitor's go I have 2 pretty nice Dell 22" 1080 60hz I was thinking about picking up a third one they are pretty cheap and running 3 monitor setup at 1080 right now. I realize a 1080 to is super overkill for that but like I said I have the money to do it and it would be nice to go straight out of the box maxing everything until I decide to buy a VR system assuming they take off. I do not see the point in saving 2-300 and buying a 1070 and finding out in 2 years it will struggle running vr.


    It does not take a lot of GPU horsepower to power 1080P 60Hz. A single 1070 will power a 3 unit setup like that, SLI to be on the safe side. When you start getting into higher resolutions (1440P, 4K) and higher refresh rates (120Hz - up), that's when you need to consider moving to the 1080 and 1080TI.
  17. Cnconrad said:

    As far as monitor's go I have 2 pretty nice Dell 22" 1080 60hz I was thinking about picking up a third one they are pretty cheap and running 3 monitor setup at 1080 right now. I realize a 1080 to is super overkill for that but like I said I have the money to do it and it would be nice to go straight out of the box maxing everything until I decide to buy a VR system assuming they take off. I do not see the point in saving 2-300 and buying a 1070 and finding out in 2 years it will struggle running vr.



    Hmmm, if you add third 1080p monitor then having futureproofing build with even GTX1080Ti is not gonna happen. Stick with 2 1080p monitors for smoother gameplay on longer run.
  18. g-unit1111 said:


    Hmm, I'll have to check around and get back to you on that one. One of the reasons I emphasize air cooling over liquid is the cost factor. Right now an NZXT Kraken X62 runs $170, a Cryorig A80 runs $159, and a Corsair H100i runs around $130 - $140. A Noctua D15 is literally 1/2 the cost with almost the exact same overclocking performance as a liquid cooler.


    Corsair H100i GTX is available for $99 and can provide good cooling while maintaining good looks of the build. Noctua D15 is not bad but for nearly same price as Corsair H100i GTX it doesn't look good at all in that Crystal case.

    g-unit1111 said:

    It does not take a lot of GPU horsepower to power 1080P 60Hz. A single 1070 will power a 3 unit setup like that, SLI to be on the safe side. When you start getting into higher resolutions (1440P, 4K) and higher refresh rates (120Hz - up), that's when you need to consider moving to the 1080 and 1080TI.


    GTX1070 is enough for 1080p gaming. But he is not gaming at 1080p as he has dual monitor setup and even if he plans to game at 1080p going for GTX1080Ti over GTX1070 help him hit his 7Yr mark of future proofing without much compromise on lowering the game settings.
  19. g-unit1111 said:
    Cnconrad said:
    Having trouble quoting you g-unit.

    Could you point me to some positive air cooler articles. Even in "stress test" builds and nearly every benchmark test I have seen it seems like EVERY reviewer used a h100i


    Hmm, I'll have to check around and get back to you on that one. One of the reasons I emphasize air cooling over liquid is the cost factor. Right now an NZXT Kraken X62 runs $170, a Cryorig A80 runs $159, and a Corsair H100i runs around $130 - $140. A Noctua D15 is literally 1/2 the cost with almost the exact same overclocking performance as a liquid cooler.

    Quote:
    We talked a bit about psu's in my last thread, would you say Seasonic Prime is better than the Corsair I picked, I definitely want a fully modular.


    Every manufacturer, Corsair, Seasonic, and EVGA included has tons of different units good and bad. Corsair's best units are the AXi and HXi. Their worst are the CX. EVGA's best units are the G2/P2/T2 and their worst are the B and W series. Seasonic's best are the Prime series, as well as the X series.

    Quote:
    As far as monitor's go I have 2 pretty nice Dell 22" 1080 60hz I was thinking about picking up a third one they are pretty cheap and running 3 monitor setup at 1080 right now. I realize a 1080 to is super overkill for that but like I said I have the money to do it and it would be nice to go straight out of the box maxing everything until I decide to buy a VR system assuming they take off. I do not see the point in saving 2-300 and buying a 1070 and finding out in 2 years it will struggle running vr.


    It does not take a lot of GPU horsepower to power 1080P 60Hz. A single 1070 will power a 3 unit setup like that, SLI to be on the safe side. When you start getting into higher resolutions (1440P, 4K) and higher refresh rates (120Hz - up), that's when you need to consider moving to the 1080 and 1080TI.



    I ended up buying a h100i for around $80 through prime day, i was pleased with the price. I also got a good deal on the 570x case $140


    Why would I buy 2 1070 cards to put in sli when a single 1080 ti is cheaper and performs better?

    Well I am moving onto the actual building and will be asking plenty more questions. I do appreciate the responses even if I dont take 100% of the advice.
  20. Cnconrad said:
    I ended up buying a h100i for around $80 through prime day, i was pleased with the price. I also got a good deal on the 570x case $140


    That is a good price for both. I do like the 570X, and that is a good price for an H100i.

    Quote:
    Why would I buy 2 1070 cards to put in sli when a single 1080 ti is cheaper and performs better?


    Yeah true, point taken. Especially with the current state of the GPU market.

    Quote:
    Well I am moving onto the actual building and will be asking plenty more questions. I do appreciate the responses even if I dont take 100% of the advice.


    Sure that's what we are here for!
  21. Best answer
    So from this list or any list I don't 100% know everything you currently have but I got as much as I could gather so this is what I put together from it:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1800X 3.6GHz 8-Core Processor ($419.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus - STRIX X370-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ B&H)
    Memory: GeIL - EVO POTENZA 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($124.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($104.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($83.61 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC Black Edition Video Card ($729.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($169.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Rosewill - Capstone 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1998.31
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-14 05:17 EDT-0400
  22. -HH- said:
    So from this list or any list I don't 100% know everything you currently have but I got as much as I could gather so this is what I put together from it:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1800X 3.6GHz 8-Core Processor ($419.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus - STRIX X370-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ B&H)
    Memory: GeIL - EVO POTENZA 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($124.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($104.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($83.61 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC Black Edition Video Card ($729.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($169.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Rosewill - Capstone 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1998.31
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-14 05:17 EDT-0400


    looks good except the psu.(seasonic prime / evga supernova gs, g2, g3/ corsair rmx rmi hxi )
    in the future make your own thread:)
  23. superninja12 said:
    -HH- said:
    So from this list or any list I don't 100% know everything you currently have but I got as much as I could gather so this is what I put together from it:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1800X 3.6GHz 8-Core Processor ($419.99 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair - H100i v2 70.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: Asus - STRIX X370-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($189.99 @ B&H)
    Memory: GeIL - EVO POTENZA 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($124.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($104.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($83.61 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 11GB SC Black Edition Video Card ($729.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Corsair - Crystal 570X RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($169.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: Rosewill - Capstone 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1998.31
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-07-14 05:17 EDT-0400


    looks good except the psu.(seasonic prime / evga supernova gs, g2, g3/ corsair rmx rmi hxi )
    in the future make your own thread:)


    I was actually trying to advise OP,

    PSU is good quality, don't worry about that, rosie caps boisssss

    No I just don't know what the OP has currently bought, so I've put the items I think he already has into this list.
  24. Update:

    Power Supply: Corsair - 760W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($149.99 @ Amazon) bought for $99.00 because of $10 instant off and $30 mail in rebate.

    I have a thread @ here http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-3467947/ideas-cooler-placement-corsair-570x.html with my latest build question.
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