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2 bad SSD's in 2 years?

Hello, novice guy here with problems. I bought a gaming PC from a company 2 years ago and have recently had my 2 SSD failure in that time, which seems odd as I thought SSD's had a selling point of being long lasting. This is the popular Samsung 250 EVO btw.

The reason I think the SSD has failed again is when I boot up, log in, and get to the desktop, I have no icons, no ability to pull up start menu, task bar, or task manager. Nothing seemed to work. I installed Windows 10 on the systems 1TB HD and everything has been working fine for 2 days. Hopefully my assumption of another bad SSD is good? Thoughts on that?

So before I think about warranty (which I read was 5 years through Samsung) or just buying another SSD, I wondered if there could be other problems leading to these failures? Something with the mobo or PSU? They are an Asus Z97-E and Corsair CX750M respectively.

Thanks for any your thoughts guys!
14 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about bad ssd years
  1. Run the latest Samsung Magician tool to check the drive integrity. You can download it from Samsung support HERE.

    The symptoms you describe do not sound like an SSD failure to me though. Post your results please.
  2. That sounds more like a Windows corruption than a SSD failure. If the SSD failed you wouldn't be able to even boot into Windows.
  3. RealBeast said:
    Run the latest Samsung Magician tool to check the drive integrity. You can download it from Samsung support HERE.

    The symptoms you describe do not sound like an SSD failure to me though. Post your results please.


    Ok well Magician Tool says the drive is "good". A performance test says 549 read, 497 write. So does this mean I simply need to uninstall Windows from the SSD then reinstall to hopefully fix this? Would I also need to uninstall Windows from my HDD?

    Thanks for the help guys...and I'm sure there's more questions to come :)
  4. So the SSD is fine, no problem there.

    I would do a clean install of Windows to the SSD while the HDD is not attached. You can then attach the HDD and access the files, and it's your call if you want the old Windows install on the HDD but I tend to clean them off.
  5. RealBeast said:
    So the SSD is fine, no problem there.

    I would do a clean install of Windows to the SSD while the HDD is not attached. You can then attach the HDD and access the files, and it's your call if you want the old Windows install on the HDD but I tend to clean them off.


    Ok so I got Windows 10 reinstalled on the SSD and it looks to be working fine. It said my old programs were in a folder called "Windows.old". Can I or should I try to recover those files (nothing too important, just games that I'd rather not spend the time to redownload)?

    Thanks again!
  6. No can't just move stuff, unless they are Steam games (you can move the whole Steam folder if needed and just reinstall the application) you need to do a clean reinstall of any programs so that the registry entries are all in the new OS.

    I usually move my data off then reformat and move it back on for a nice clean start for the storage drive and do not keep Windows.old. I'm pretty meticulous about back up though with a *large* NAS box that I use systematically and often.
  7. RealBeast said:
    No can't just move stuff, unless they are Steam games (you can move the whole Steam folder if needed and just reinstall the application) you need to do a clean reinstall of any programs so that the registry entries are all in the new OS.

    I usually move my data off then reformat and move it back on for a nice clean start for the storage drive and do not keep Windows.old. I'm pretty meticulous about back up though with a *large* NAS box that I use systematically and often.


    Ok I deleted Windows.old, redid my overclocking on the CPU, GPU, and memory, did some windows gaming tweaking I read about on-line, and my framerates are higher than before :) CPU usage isn't spiking up as high. Really wish I knew what went wrong, but I have a feeling that's a tough one to answer.

    Another novice question, but any basic things I need to do to prevent further issues? I've heard SSD's don't need as much maintenance as HDD's. One thing I read was to manually uninstall/install GPU drivers which I will do now instead of using NVIDIA Experience. I don't think I would have dl'd a virus or anything as I mainly just game and watch a little Youtube and Twitch on this pc. I'll certainly try to backup everything properly this time.
  8. Spoke too soon. Game performance has slowed down again with crashes and blue screens. Not sure if I should try to hunt down component failure or maybe completely wipe both drives, then reinstall everything?
  9. Best answer
    I would run a memory test using the free MEMTEST and if your memory passes do a clean installation with only the OS SSD attached during the install.

    I would not start a bug hunt through all the other components unless the new install is problematic, as that is a lot of work that is likely not necessary.

    Not much you need to do to maintain an SSD, just set everything the way that Magician wants in the optimization and then maybe an occasional junk file delete with CCleaner then a manual TRIM.

    Once your overclock is set where you want it, run Prime95 to insure stability (using an older version 26.6 -- read Computronix best answer HERE to understand the details of why the older version -- basically to avoid the AVX extensions from running on the FPU).
  10. RealBeast said:
    I would run a memory test using the free MEMTEST and if your memory passes do a clean installation with only the OS SSD attached during the install.

    I would not start a bug hunt through all the other components unless the new install is problematic, as that is a lot of work that is likely not necessary.

    Not much you need to do to maintain an SSD, just set everything the way that Magician wants in the optimization and then maybe an occasional junk file delete with CCleaner then a manual TRIM.

    Once your overclock is set where you want it, run Prime95 to insure stability (using an older version 26.6 -- read Computronix best answer HERE to understand the details of why the older version -- basically to avoid the AVX extensions from running on the FPU).


    Ok I ran Memtest and got 300,999 errors. Sounds impressive! The test recorded more info, not sure what's usefull.

    But I read something saying Memtest errors don't automatically point to memory problems. A bit confusing.

    The PC came with 2 x 4GB of Adata DDR 1600 RAM. I added another 2 sticks of Adata RAM maybe 6 months ago that I was told would work with the existing ram (DDR3-1600, 1.5V, 9-9-9-24 timing on both pairs).
  11. Any error on Memtest mean a problem -- either with the physical sticks, with the use of them as a set, or with your memory settings.

    The best approach is to pull the recently added pair and rerun just the old pair. If they pass, then swap the memory out for the new memory and run it. If both pairs run individually you have some memory tweaking to do, but if either pair fail the likely bad stick is in that pair. The memory errors are what is corrupting your Windows install.

    To mix memory (while it doesn't always work) the best settings are those that equal the slowest speed, highest Vdimm (memory voltage) and loosest timings that is common to all sticks.

    If the individual pairs pass memtest, post the model numbers for the sticks and your motherboard model and I'll look at what setting may work. But if a pair individually fails at its rated settings, it is best to RMA that pair.
  12. RealBeast said:
    Any error on Memtest mean a problem -- either with the physical sticks, with the use of them as a set, or with your memory settings.

    The best approach is to pull the recently added pair and rerun just the old pair. If they pass, then swap the memory out for the new memory and run it. If both pairs run individually you have some memory tweaking to do, but if either pair fail the likely bad stick is in that pair. The memory errors are what is corrupting your Windows install.

    To mix memory (while it doesn't always work) the best settings are those that equal the slowest speed, highest Vdimm (memory voltage) and loosest timings that is common to all sticks.

    If the individual pairs pass memtest, post the model numbers for the sticks and your motherboard model and I'll look at what setting may work. But if a pair individually fails at its rated settings, it is best to RMA that pair.


    Original pair installed alone passed w/o errors, but the 2nd pair alone had tons of errors, guess it's just a defective pair.

    I did test the 2nd pair in the slots they were installed in instead of the spots the original pair were in...could those mobo slots have some kinda issue? I can run the test again with the "bad" pair in the other slots if necessary.
  13. Probably not a slot issue but you could test that if you are curious.

    Memory makers generally want you to RMA the pair even if only one is bad, so no need to go to that effort.
  14. RealBeast said:
    Probably not a slot issue but you could test that if you are curious.

    Memory makers generally want you to RMA the pair even if only one is bad, so no need to go to that effort.


    Well the memory failed in either slot pairs, so I'll try to RMA. Thanks again, you've been a big help! :)
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