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How to tell if your MOBO is dying?

Hello, first of all I'd like to thank everyone in this website for my previous thread was replied to really quickly and I got actually helpful information unlike anywhere else I go.
I would also like to explain my current situation: I live in a country where computer parts are extremely expensive mostly due to taxation, so I wanna to have as much confidence as possible when replacing what I think is a faulty part.

This is the issue I was having: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/3491096/last-read

It now happens less oftenly and I can actually boot my PC thanks to the solution that guy proposed. Whenever my PC boots, it works completely fine, no lag at all in games everything just works like they always have. However, when I try booting it up I usually have to try 2-3 times because Windows has a huge chance of hanging during startup (the circling dots) (I've already tried several solutions, all to no avail)

So I want to know if this means a dying MOBO so I can get it replaced asap with the funds i have.
9 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about mobo dying
  1. Try opening your PC cabinet and remove all the connections for cleaning up the dust and moisture content and try to boot up.
    If the problem persists, check if the PSU fan turns as soon as you try to boot up your PC.


    if it does then there is a motherboard issue.

    if the fan turns after few attempts of booting, then test your PSU as it is shown in the below link:

    http://www.wikihow.com/Check-a-Power-Supply

    After the test is successful, if there is no problem with the PSU, check for the connection between your power button and the motherboard.

    Even after all these attempts if the problem persist, then there's a problem with your Motherboard.

    Good Luck :) Peace.
  2. Hello my pc gets past BIOS and everything starts working even my mouse and keyboard, so the psu fans do work. However the spinning dots of windows 10 freeze and the OS never boots
  3. Your PC config please.

    Peace.
  4. 1. Whenever you run into a problem more-or-less along the lines of the problem you've been reporting, one of the first (if not THE first) troubleshooting steps to take is to test the health of the drive involved - in this case apparently your boot drive. The manufacturer's diagnostic test is generally preferable, but any HDD/SSD diagnostic program, e.g., HD Sentinel which we prefer, will generally suffice.

    2. You should determine early-on in the troubleshooting process whether you're dealing with a defective drive since that component is so frequently the source of any problem a PC user is experiencing. By doing so you avoid the unnecessary, frustrating, frequently onerous chore of tracking down the source of the problem.

    3. Should the drive prove non-defective well & good. Then, of course, you must go on to other things depending upon the specific nature of the problem.

    4. So we'll assume in this case your drive is non-defective. Is that a reasonable assumption based upon what I've indicated above?

    If you're inclined to do so, respond to the above. If you do respond it would be helpful - indeed vital - that you provide details about the PC & system you're working with. So we have an understanding of the specific components that may be involved and the troubleshooting steps you've previously taken. Be as detailed as you can.

    (I presume you're communicating on this "forum" with the PC in question, yes?)
  5. VJ_Gamer said:
    Your PC config please.

    Peace.

    CPU: Intel Core i5 4570 3.2 GHZ
    RAM: 2x8GB DDR3 HyperX 1333Mhz
    GPU ZOTAC GTX 760 2GB
    Storage: 931GB Hitachi HDS721010KLA330 (SATA)
    MOBO: GIGABYTE H87M-D3H
    Windows 10 Pro 64 bit


    ArtPog said:
    1. Whenever you run into a problem more-or-less along the lines of the problem you've been reporting, one of the first (if not THE first) troubleshooting steps to take is to test the health of the drive involved - in this case apparently your boot drive. The manufacturer's diagnostic test is generally preferable, but any HDD/SSD diagnostic program, e.g., HD Sentinel which we prefer, will generally suffice.

    2. You should determine early-on in the troubleshooting process whether you're dealing with a defective drive since that component is so frequently the source of any problem a PC user is experiencing. By doing so you avoid the unnecessary, frustrating, frequently onerous chore of tracking down the source of the problem.

    3. Should the drive prove non-defective well & good. Then, of course, you must go on to other things depending upon the specific nature of the problem.

    4. So we'll assume in this case your drive is non-defective. Is that a reasonable assumption based upon what I've indicated above?

    If you're inclined to do so, respond to the above. If you do respond it would be helpful - indeed vital - that you provide details about the PC & system you're working with. So we have an understanding of the specific components that may be involved and the troubleshooting steps you've previously taken. Be as detailed as you can.

    (I presume you're communicating on this "forum" with the PC in question, yes?)

    All HDD-diagnosing software I tried say that it's okay and whenever I get to boot my PC the HDD seems to work fine (I was capable of backing up a lot of my stuff and I can load heavy objetcts and maps in games as I've always been able to. Regarding what i've already tried, the only big thing I've done is pretty much restore the system through Windows. I am currently on the PC in question.
    My specs:
    http://speccy.piriform.com/results/4tR1HJshpTUiFQ2vspJUqn8

    (Also, thanks a lot for what you said, it will be without any doubt useful in any future troubleshooting I might need to do)
  6. Also, the issue now seems to follow a weird pattern: At first try, Windows will boot REALLY quickly (as in, go straight from the Windows logo to logon. After using it for a bit, it will crash and restart by itself. After it happens, the problem will present itself in two forms:
    1 - Either getting stuck at the circling dots like it always has
    2 - or by going from the circling dots to a black screen, restarting half a minute after
  7. 1. It's virtually impossible to determine the precise cause of the problem you're experiencing based on what we think we know about your system & problem (other than the fact that apparently you're NOT dealing with a defective boot HDD which is a leading cause of so many problems affecting a PC).

    2. Before we go any further to possibly determine whether the problem involves a hardware issue, have you given any thought to a fresh install of the Win 10 OS on the chance that you simply may be dealing with a corrupt OS and a reinstallation of such could be the most straightforward way of correcting the problem if that is indeed the problem?

    I realize that may not be a practical solution (since the problem may not be caused by a dysfunctional OS due to corruption of such), but perhaps more importantly the volume of data on your 1 TB boot will probably mitigate against such an option.

    3. I nearly always doubt the problem such as the one you're experiencing is caused by a defective motherboard unless there is strong evidence to the contrary. It's possible, of course, but as a general proposition it's generally not the problem in most cases in my experience. Naturally the problem could conceivably involve a hardware issue.

    4. So let me ask you this...is there any chance you can lay your hands (even temporarily) on a HDD (or SSD) and fresh-install the Win 10 OS on your system? If the result is a viable, bootable, functional OS then we know the problem is very likely not hardware-related and simply due to a corrupted OS.

    5. I'm sure at this point I don't have to emphasize or even scold you for failing to have a comprehensive backup of your system available. It's absolutely crucial for virtually every PC user to have such, so please, when this problem is resolved ensure that henceforth you will have such, preferably through the use of a disk-cloning program that's updated from time to time.
  8. ArtPog said:
    1. It's virtually impossible to determine the precise cause of the problem you're experiencing based on what we think we know about your system & problem (other than the fact that apparently you're NOT dealing with a defective boot HDD which is a leading cause of so many problems affecting a PC).

    2. Before we go any further to possibly determine whether the problem involves a hardware issue, have you given any thought to a fresh install of the Win 10 OS on the chance that you simply may be dealing with a corrupt OS and a reinstallation of such could be the most straightforward way of correcting the problem if that is indeed the problem?

    I realize that may not be a practical solution (since the problem may not be caused by a dysfunctional OS due to corruption of such), but perhaps more importantly the volume of data on your 1 TB boot will probably mitigate against such an option.

    3. I nearly always doubt the problem such as the one you're experiencing is caused by a defective motherboard unless there is strong evidence to the contrary. It's possible, of course, but as a general proposition it's generally not the problem in most cases in my experience. Naturally the problem could conceivably involve a hardware issue.

    4. So let me ask you this...is there any chance you can lay your hands (even temporarily) on a HDD (or SSD) and fresh-install the Win 10 OS on your system? If the result is a viable, bootable, functional OS then we know the problem is very likely not hardware-related and simply due to a corrupted OS.

    5. I'm sure at this point I don't have to emphasize or even scold you for failing to have a comprehensive backup of your system available. It's absolutely crucial for virtually every PC user to have such, so please, when this problem is resolved ensure that henceforth you will have such, preferably through the use of a disk-cloning program that's updated from time to time.

    Well I currently have a lot of data stored in my HDD that I would just hate to lose and have to get again (from games to programs to taxes, et cetera) so I would like to try every solution that doesn't involve resintalling the OS if possible.
  9. Best answer
    I wish I could better advise you or at least felt comfortable in suggesting another "plan of action" that I truly thought could resolve the issue you're experiencing.

    I'm assuming that you're a reasonably experienced user and have followed the usual troubleshooting steps to determine whether the issue is simply a corrupted OS and not a hardware-related issue.

    That you've undertaken disk cleanup, checking for malware, running the sfc /scannow command, review of your startup programs, etc., and the usual type of review a PC user should undertake in situations like this.

    You could try the "Repair computer" command on the opening screen of the Win 10 installation media and follow whatever steps are subsequently available. Frankly, we've have little success with that undertaking but I suppose it's worth a try. You might want to do some Google research on this process.

    If you still are considering the problem(s) are the result of a hardware issue (I'm aware you've specifically mentioned the MB) the only practical course of action to determine if that is the problem is to "start over" as it were (in effect) rebuilding your PC.

    When all is said & done the only definitive way for the PC user is to replace a possibly defective component with a known non-defective component. Realistically (for most PC users) that's not an option that is open to them. I understand that. But at least at times one can, at least, determine the component that is or most likely the cause of the problem(s).

    Anyway, if you want to take that route, here's an outline of the basic procedure you might follow...

    1. Confirm that you've tested your Hitachi HDD with the WD/HGST program and/or one or more other reliable HDD diagnostic programs. We're particularly fond of the HD Sentinel program.

    2. Ditto for the Microsoft Windows Memory Diagnostic tool or other memory diagnostic you may use.

    3. While you're at it check the CPU with the Intel Processor Diagnostic Tool.

    4. The basic approach would be along the following lines...
    A. Get inside your desktop computer case (after disconnecting the A/C plug from your wall socket) and determine that the CPU, heat sink, memory modules & graphics card are all properly seated and all connections appear secure. Remove (disconnect) ALL - repeat, ALL - peripheral devices including all HHD & SSD drive(s), optical drive(s), sound card, etc. Disconnect ALL storage devices, printers, and any other devices connected to the machine.

    (As an aside, if it's practical to do so and not too onerous, it would be even better if your would remove the motherboard + components from the case and work with it outside of the case - perhaps on the cardboard case the MB was packaged in if you still have it or some other non-electric conducting surface, e.g., cardboard, wood, etc.)

    B. In any event, all you'll be working with is your motherboard, processor, heat sink, RAM, graphics card, power supply, keyboard & mouse. Better yet, should your motherboard have onboard graphics capability, disconnect your graphics/video card from the system. Just ensure that following access of the BIOS/UEFI interface, if there is a BIOS setting for onboard graphics display that BIOS setting is enabled since that setting is frequently disabled as the default setting.

    C. Reconnect your A/C cord and power on the system. What happens? Do you get a "normal" screen display? No error messages or strange notations from the system?

    D. Can you access your BIOS/UEFI without any difficulty at this point and review the CMOS-BIOS settings? In particular, ensure that the SATA controller mode is set to AHCI (which should be the default setting). Check the hardware monitor/PC Health in the BIOS to determine that all temps are within normal range?

    E. Assuming all is well at this point leave the system powered on for the next hour or so, checking to see if anything untoward shows up. Using your reset button, try powering down & up a few times to determine if there are any problems there.

    F. Now you can install your graphics card in case it hasn't as yet been installed.

    G. Along the way of the above steps if there's any indication of a faulty PSU, test that component with a PSU power tester (assuming you have one) or better yet, substitute a known non-defective PSU should one be available.

    H. Should all appear well at this point this is an indication that there's nothing wrong with the basic components of your system. While not absolutely definitive this is so, it's a very strong indication that something else is amiss.

    All this, of course, is to rule out at least to some degree) that the problem is not hardware-related insofar as the basic components currently installed in the PC.

    Finally, install any BIOS update.

    6. At this point install the SSD boot drive in your system and boot to the OS. Hopefully the system will boot & function problem-free. Work with the boot drive as the ONLY drive installed for some time to determine no problems exist.

    7. Install one of your secondary HDDs and similarly work with the system to determine all is well.

    8. Then the other HDD.

    I just don't see any other practical series of troubleshooting steps at this point but perhaps you have some other ideas. If I have any other thoughts in the meantime I'll pass them on. In any event keep us apprised of your progress (or lack of!). Good luck!
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