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Need help setting up my fans

I'm about to start a new build and want some advice about how to set my fans up.

Case: Phanteks Enthoo Evolv
- with 3 140mm fans on front
GPU: 1080 Ti FTW3 HYBRID
- 120mm radiator fan on back
CPU cooler: 240mm (2x120) on top

So I've got three 140mm intake fans on the front and three 120mm exhaust fans on the back and top. The GPU and CPU radiator fans will change speed according to their temperature. Is there a way to link one intake fan to the GPU temp and the other two intake fans to the CPU temp? Since they're bigger that would maintain positive air pressure. My case has a fan hub but I'm not really sure how to set everything up.
Reply to HK_Gail
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about setting fans
  1. I have the same case as you (ATX). Linking your front intake to your GPU temperature is possible but I'm not sure if you can do it with the on-board hub but you can do some of this like so: https://youtu.be/8VjdQStihsE?t=412

    Also, some would not agree with your positive air pressure, but I personally like it because it seem to create less dust. There are different opinions on this, it seems
    http://www.tomshardware.com/faq/id-1858957/airflow-101-setting-fans-keeping-computer-cool.html
    One thing is for sure, one should not do this in excess and perhaps 3x140mm int vs 3x120mm out might be a bit excessive on the negative pressure side of things:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8EN3K-eaVA

    But, you can also just monitor your temperatures manually. All components are linked to some extent. I don't think running 2 intake faster for this and 2 intake faster for that is the way to go overall. You could link all intake fans to a central temperature point (e.g. CPU). Your GPU will get hot in games and will blow hot air in your case. This in turn is going to go upwards and spin onto your CPU. Your CPU will get hotter quite quickly if your airflow is not sufficient.
    The NVidia cards generally can go up to around 83C by design but even if they go over 90C they just throttle back (don't try this at home like I did). So if you monitor your CPU and GPU temperatures you can already see what temperatures will be acceptable with what kind of fan setup.

    Personally I run my enthoo ATX with the 2 standard 140mm in the front (though I have more if I want to put it in) and one 140mm exhaust in the back.
    I have no fans on the top. The CPU cooler has 2x140mm fans via a Coolermaster Master Air maker 8 that blows directly onto the exhaust 140mm fan creating quite a strong little jetstream in the case. I have a GTX 1080 FE which blows most of its heat out at the back (so this is where yours is much different and need to experiment). My components run nice and cool. CPU is generally below 60C in games and the GPU does its thing around 65-80C like it should. I have the fans on auto, but i did define a curve on CPU targeted at silence.
    Setting up your fans, can be good fun. Hope you enjoy it and hope this helped.
    Reply to gaborbarla
  2. You can also look into using software like SpeedFan to do the job. It is a bit un-user friendly but it works. Depending on the headers that you connect to, you can do custom profiles based on the temperatures of individual components.

    http://www.almico.com/sfdownload.php
    Reply to HamBown81
  3. I think the temps in my case will be a bit lower because my gpu and cpu are both liquid cooled, and their three radiators are my only out fans. I just want to link my intake fans to them so I won't have to watch temps and manually adjust them. I'll try running them a bit slower than the out fans to lower the pressure. Thanks for the tip.
    Reply to HK_Gail
  4. HK_Gail said:
    I think the temps in my case will be a bit lower because my gpu and cpu are both liquid cooled, and their three radiators are my only out fans. I just want to link my intake fans to them so I won't have to watch temps and manually adjust them. I'll try running them a bit slower than the out fans to lower the pressure. Thanks for the tip.

    If you want to straight link them, you can split two (or more) fans off of a single header with a Y-cable as long as you don't overdraw on current.

    Check your manual, but most headers are rated for 1A, each fan will have specs on its current draw.
    Reply to HamBown81
  5. My motherboard is a rog maximums ix hero. Does it's bios, or software, allow fan profiles based on cpu/gpu?
    Reply to HK_Gail
  6. HK_Gail said:
    My motherboard is a rog maximums ix hero. Does it's bios, or software, allow fan profiles based on cpu/gpu?

    The ASUS Fan Xpert software is an option. Personally I haven't used the newer software but the old versions were a mess. Would have to look into its functionality.

    SpeedFan reads directly from all of the temperature sensors and gives you a lot of freedom, which is why I like it. It isn't pretty or easy to use (necessarily) but it works the way I want it to.
    Reply to HamBown81
  7. If I use speedfan, or ASUS Fan Xpert, do I have to run the program every time for its setting to take affect, or does it run on startup in the background?
    Reply to HK_Gail
  8. Best answer
    HK_Gail said:
    If I use speedfan, or ASUS Fan Xpert, do I have to run the program every time for its setting to take affect, or does it run on startup in the background?

    You can create a task in the Task Manager and have it run at login. That is what I do for SpeedFan.

    I have not used the newer Fan Xpert software, but I am certain it can be set to run at start-up
    Reply to HamBown81
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