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1000$ budget build for a friend. Any suggestions?

Hello there user, i see that i've seeked your attention.

So, there is this one friend I have and he wants to get into pc gaming and has 1000$ to spend on his brand new rig and i would love to hear suggestions from someone who has a clue at what he / she is doing. He had gone on pcpartpicker.com and came up with a build on his own (He has no clue what hes doing).

I don't know how well the pc would perform in this generation but i know for sure its going to be weak. I'm not a genius or very tech savy so i really could just be wrong and thats why i have visited the forums for help and suggestions. I dont even know if the build is compatible or not, mainly because i haven't given it a good look yet. I have built my own budget gaming pc but that too i went on the forums for help for. I dont think anyone would want to hear my story ;-;

Well, here is his build anyways. As I said earlier, he does not know what hes doing. By the looks of things, he has gone for an AMD system and if an intel system would perform better then i would like to know with a reply.


P.s He would be using the pc for gaming at general 1080p gaming. I'm going to have to assume its 1080 because thats the monitor he owns at the moment.

The build he came up with

Processor - AMD FX-4300 - 97$
Motherboard - Gigabyte GA-970A-DS3 - 104$
RAM - Kingston KTA-MB1600L/8G 8 GB DDR3 - 50$
PSU - Cooler Master Thunder 500 500W - 50$
Cabinet - Cooler Master HAF 912 Combat - 100$
Hard Drive - WD Caviar Green WD10EZRX 1 TB - 60$
Optical Drive - Samsung SH-224BB - 20$
SSD - Kingston SSDNow V100 SV100S2/64G 64 GB - 60$
Graphic Card - ZOTAC GTX660 2 GB DDR5 - 221$
Sound Card - Zebronics SC-6CH - 7$
Cabinet Cooler - Cooler Master XtraFlo Cooler - 10$
Processor Cooler - Cooler Master Vortex 211P Cooler - 10$

Total rounds about to 1000$

If anyone knows what they are doing then please leave suggestions on how this build could improve. If an intel system is better then please let me know.

The forums have helped me complete my build and leave me satisfied. I hope the same is done to my friend. thank you for reading if not helping. :)
44 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 1000 budget build friend suggestions
  1. Phenomenally bad build for a grand.
    Also it only adds up to 787.
  2. Does he have preference on AMD or intel?
  3. bjornl said:
    Phenomenally bad build for a grand.


    I agree, I dont believe I have seen something this bad in a while
  4. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i3-8350K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock - Z370 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($111.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: PNY - Anarchy 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($97.03 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB SC GAMING Video Card ($264.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: Corsair - CSM 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $994.53
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-27 18:55 EDT-0400
  5. i3-8350k is hard to find in stock and requires a cooler. For just 1080p, a 1300x with stock cooler would suffice, and may as well get a 1070 or save some money and step down to a 1060 6GB.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 1300X 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($127.39 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - AB350M Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: PNY - Anarchy 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC GAMING ACX 3.0 Black Edition Video Card ($394.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $956.01
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-27 19:06 EDT-0400
  6. bjornl said:
    Here is a 1k build worth the price
    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/qVZhCy


    could change the cpu to the i5-8400 for better performance, have to change the mobo too but I think itd be worth it
  7. ziffland said:
    bjornl said:
    Here is a 1k build worth the price
    https://pcpartpicker.com/list/qVZhCy


    could change the cpu to the i5-8400 for better performance, have to change the mobo too but I think itd be worth it


    I agree and would have done so if the coffeelake were more readily available.
  8. John__Titor said:
    i3-8350k is hard to find in stock and requires a cooler. For just 1080p, a 1300x with stock cooler would suffice, and may as well get a 1070 or save some money and step down to a 1060 6GB.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 1300X 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($127.39 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - AB350M Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: PNY - Anarchy 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC GAMING ACX 3.0 Black Edition Video Card ($394.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $956.01
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-27 19:06 EDT-0400


    True, the 1070 will offset the CPU while the AM4 platform will be here to stay which means it will be easier for you to change for a better CPU later on.
  9. bjornl said:
    Phenomenally bad build for a grand.
    Also it only adds up to 787.


    that is excluding the peripherals
  10. ziffland said:
    Does he have preference on AMD or intel?


    No he doesn't. If an intel system is better than sure.
  11. ziffland said:
    bjornl said:
    Phenomenally bad build for a grand.


    I agree, I dont believe I have seen something this bad in a while


    As i mentioned earlier. He has no clue what he is doing.
  12. John__Titor said:
    i3-8350k is hard to find in stock and requires a cooler. For just 1080p, a 1300x with stock cooler would suffice, and may as well get a 1070 or save some money and step down to a 1060 6GB.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 3 1300X 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($127.39 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - AB350M Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: PNY - Anarchy 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC GAMING ACX 3.0 Black Edition Video Card ($394.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($48.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $956.01
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-27 19:06 EDT-0400


    Okay, so if my friend was to get this system then in the future what are his upgrade choices?
  13. voxic said:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i3-8350K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock - Z370 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($111.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: PNY - Anarchy 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($97.03 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB SC GAMING Video Card ($264.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: Corsair - CSM 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $994.53
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-27 18:55 EDT-0400


    So is the coffeelake something worth going after right now? because i was thinking its better to wait for more support for the 8th gen series. like ive heard cheaper motherboards will be getting released in a while which support the 8th gen coffeelake processors. Let me know if i'm wrong
  14. bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?
  15. TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?

    A 1070 system will out preform a 1060 based system in FPS. However this system is otherwise constructed of better parts. Better CPU, a motherboard which is overclocking friendly, faster ram, a better case, power supply, and across the board better parts. In my opinion a better computer which will put up nearly the same performance from its video card so long as the gaming is 1080p/60hz. Also it will probably remain fairly relevant in a year or two when the video card is replaced.
  16. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: Seagate - FireCuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Hybrid Internal Hard Drive ($99.88 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB SC GAMING Video Card ($264.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Zalman - Z3 ATX Mid Tower Case ($35.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 520W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($36.98 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On - iHAS124-14 DVD/CD Writer ($10.99 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Total: $917.23
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-28 13:37 EDT-0400

    Used a hybrid hard drive for simplicity to allow higher storage over SSD, I found that for the non tech savy it may become a issue if the primary drive is small and they start to run out of space as everything defaults to wanting to load on C: they may be curious as to whats going on or get frustrated at having to put things on the slower hard drive. This should alleviate that while still providing a good middle ground between HDD and SSD.

    Beyond that basic this is a basic build that doesn't allow overclocking which I wouldn't venture into for a friends build as it's a recipe for head aches when something goes wrong. And do need an operating system (Windows 10)?
  17. TheDarkIce said:
    voxic said:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i3-8350K 4.0GHz Quad-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: ASRock - Z370 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($111.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: PNY - Anarchy 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($139.99 @ Best Buy)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($97.03 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB SC GAMING Video Card ($264.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: Corsair - CSM 650W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $994.53
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-27 18:55 EDT-0400


    So is the coffeelake something worth going after right now? because i was thinking its better to wait for more support for the 8th gen series. like ive heard cheaper motherboards will be getting released in a while which support the 8th gen coffeelake processors. Let me know if i'm wrong



    Bro I have no idea, I don't pay too much attention to what is going to be released.
  18. Cheaper "B" or"H" boards although released wil have their restrictions as well. A "Z" board does have the advantage of being able to use higher speed ram,although in this case the lower end boards may be able to use 2666mhz ram, and a kind of overclocking is still doable with making the "stock" cpu run all cores at max turbo.
    The 8400 is hard to get right now so using it depends on that more than performance.

    Got some ideas of my own of course :). For Intel,

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - M9i 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370 GAMING PLUS ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB AMP! Edition Video Card ($269.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Corsair - Graphite Series 230T Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $996.97
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 09:08 EDT-0400

    Can also use AMD,

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1500X 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.38 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AB350-GAMING 3 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($85.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($29.09 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Mini Video Card ($393.88 @ OutletPC)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1000.85
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 09:02 EDT-0400
    or

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($193.88 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AB350-GAMING 3 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Mini Video Card ($393.88 @ OutletPC)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $995.27
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 09:02 EDT-0400

    this latest can also be used with the next for more storage,
    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/n28H99/seagate-firecuda-1tb-35-7200rpm-hybrid-internal-hard-drive-st1000dx002
    may be wiser,add an ssd later.He can also get more storage (ssd+hdd) and just use the gtx 1060 and be fine for 1080p gaming with decent settings.


    Biggest difference is the gpu,AMD builds use the gtx 1070,the Intel the gtx 1060.For most fps will the AMD builds do best.Alas is the Intel cpu the better (again).Nothing wrong with the AMD cpu's btw.
    There are some rebate options in these builds not taken into acount so builds can become cheaper if he can use these.

    I do think that the small ssd+hdd is the choice,your friend just has to google how to transfer default place of big storage files to the hdd.Keep an eye on where to store what he installs when installing,normally the \C: drive is used,he needs to change that to "other letter/drive" when installing.
  19. Vic 40 said:
    Cheaper "B" or"H" boards although released wil have their restrictions as well. A "Z" board does have the advantage of being able to use higher speed ram,although in this case the lower end boards may be able to use 2666mhz ram, and a kind of overclocking is still doable with making the "stock" cpu run all cores at max turbo.
    The 8400 is hard to get right now so using it depends on that more than performance.

    Got some ideas of my own of course :). For Intel,

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - M9i 48.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($19.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370 GAMING PLUS ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.69 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB AMP! Edition Video Card ($269.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Corsair - Graphite Series 230T Black ATX Mid Tower Case ($53.99 @ Amazon)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $996.97
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 09:08 EDT-0400

    Can also use AMD,

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1500X 3.5GHz Quad-Core Processor ($169.38 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AB350-GAMING 3 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($85.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 500GB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($29.09 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Mini Video Card ($393.88 @ OutletPC)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1000.85
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 09:02 EDT-0400
    or

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($193.88 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AB350-GAMING 3 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($84.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: SK hynix - SL308 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($78.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Mini Video Card ($393.88 @ OutletPC)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $995.27
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 09:02 EDT-0400

    this latest can also be used with the next for more storage,
    https://pcpartpicker.com/product/n28H99/seagate-firecuda-1tb-35-7200rpm-hybrid-internal-hard-drive-st1000dx002
    may be wiser,add an ssd later.He can also get more storage (ssd+hdd) and just use the gtx 1060 and be fine for 1080p gaming with decent settings.


    Biggest difference is the gpu,AMD builds use the gtx 1070,the Intel the gtx 1060.For most fps will the AMD builds do best.Alas is the Intel cpu the better (again).Nothing wrong with the AMD cpu's btw.
    There are some rebate options in these builds not taken into acount so builds can become cheaper if he can use these.

    I do think that the small ssd+hdd is the choice,your friend just has to google how to transfer default place of big storage files to the hdd.Keep an eye on where to store what he installs when installing,normally the \C: drive is used,he needs to change that to "other letter/drive" when installing.


    Even tho hes not a tech savy person hes smart enough to understand that he wuold have 2 drives. a smaller one and a much larger one. I could explain it to him how he could utilize both efficiently so thats never a problem
  20. assasin32 said:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($99.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: Seagate - FireCuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Hybrid Internal Hard Drive ($99.88 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB SC GAMING Video Card ($264.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Zalman - Z3 ATX Mid Tower Case ($35.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 520W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($36.98 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On - iHAS124-14 DVD/CD Writer ($10.99 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Total: $917.23
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-28 13:37 EDT-0400

    Used a hybrid hard drive for simplicity to allow higher storage over SSD, I found that for the non tech savy it may become a issue if the primary drive is small and they start to run out of space as everything defaults to wanting to load on C: they may be curious as to whats going on or get frustrated at having to put things on the slower hard drive. This should alleviate that while still providing a good middle ground between HDD and SSD.

    Beyond that basic this is a basic build that doesn't allow overclocking which I wouldn't venture into for a friends build as it's a recipe for head aches when something goes wrong. And do need an operating system (Windows 10)?


    I would still go for the ssd + hard drive combo. I could explain to him how he could use them and space out storage. also do you really thinkk thats a good cpu to go for right now?
  21. bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?

    A 1070 system will out preform a 1060 based system in FPS. However this system is otherwise constructed of better parts. Better CPU, a motherboard which is overclocking friendly, faster ram, a better case, power supply, and across the board better parts. In my opinion a better computer which will put up nearly the same performance from its video card so long as the gaming is 1080p/60hz. Also it will probably remain fairly relevant in a year or two when the video card is replaced.


    So, if I were to suggest him this build, what would he be able to upgrade in the future? i mean beside the basic ram, video card and storage
  22. TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?

    A 1070 system will out preform a 1060 based system in FPS. However this system is otherwise constructed of better parts. Better CPU, a motherboard which is overclocking friendly, faster ram, a better case, power supply, and across the board better parts. In my opinion a better computer which will put up nearly the same performance from its video card so long as the gaming is 1080p/60hz. Also it will probably remain fairly relevant in a year or two when the video card is replaced.


    So, if I were to suggest him this build, what would he be able to upgrade in the future? i mean beside the basic ram, video card and storage


    You could upgrade the CPU to an i7 in the future.
  23. TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?

    A 1070 system will out preform a 1060 based system in FPS. However this system is otherwise constructed of better parts. Better CPU, a motherboard which is overclocking friendly, faster ram, a better case, power supply, and across the board better parts. In my opinion a better computer which will put up nearly the same performance from its video card so long as the gaming is 1080p/60hz. Also it will probably remain fairly relevant in a year or two when the video card is replaced.


    So, if I were to suggest him this build, what would he be able to upgrade in the future? i mean beside the basic ram, video card and storage


    Yes. It is an upgrade-able build, which is built out of slightly better than standard parts. His first upgrade is likely to be a second HD to backup stuff to. Everything in that build is upgrade-able. But other than adding a low-cost disk down the road, he is not going to need much in the near term to play at a standard 1080p 60fps.
  24. bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?

    A 1070 system will out preform a 1060 based system in FPS. However this system is otherwise constructed of better parts. Better CPU, a motherboard which is overclocking friendly, faster ram, a better case, power supply, and across the board better parts. In my opinion a better computer which will put up nearly the same performance from its video card so long as the gaming is 1080p/60hz. Also it will probably remain fairly relevant in a year or two when the video card is replaced.


    So, if I were to suggest him this build, what would he be able to upgrade in the future? i mean beside the basic ram, video card and storage


    Yes. It is an upgrade-able build, which is built out of slightly better than standard parts. His first upgrade is likely to be a second HD to backup stuff to. Everything in that build is upgrade-able. But other than adding a low-cost disk down the road, he is not going to need much in the near term to play at a standard 1080p 60fps.


    Hey, sorry for the late reply. i was busy with some stuffs. I have decided to go with your build that you suggested with that i5 and im gonna make sure that i make the best out of it. thank you for helping me out and being a great sport. :)
  25. This is a spam joke thread. A gtx660 for over $200. Really. people gettind sucked it to giving advice.
  26. Bungle11 said:
    This is a spam joke thread. A gtx660 for over $200. Really. people gettind sucked it to giving advice.


    No it's not. My friend had no clue what he was doing. I don't know what part of that you don't understand. He is new to the gaming community and the pc master race. He does not know what a good graphics card in this gen is or whatever. All I'm trying to say is this post that I made is 100% legitimate and genuine.
  27. Bungle11 said:
    This is a spam joke thread. A gtx660 for over $200. Really. people gettind sucked it to giving advice.


    Hey look, if you don't have anything constructive to add, don't add it. A post like this makes us look elitist. Keep the negativity to yourself.

    TheDarkIce said:
    No it's not. My friend had no clue what he was doing. I don't know what part of that you don't understand. He is new to the gaming community and the pc master race. He does not know what a good graphics card in this gen is or whatever. All I'm trying to say is this post that I made is 100% legitimate and genuine.


    Yeah I do agree with the sentiment here that that's an extremely terirble build. You don't want someone who doesn't know what they are doing to get suckered into buying several generation old parts on a dead platform at that. You always want the best you can afford. I would go with an Intel 8000 series or a Ryzen.
  28. g-unit1111 said:
    Bungle11 said:
    This is a spam joke thread. A gtx660 for over $200. Really. people gettind sucked it to giving advice.


    Hey look, if you don't have anything constructive to add, don't add it. A post like this makes us look elitist. Keep the negativity to yourself.

    TheDarkIce said:
    No it's not. My friend had no clue what he was doing. I don't know what part of that you don't understand. He is new to the gaming community and the pc master race. He does not know what a good graphics card in this gen is or whatever. All I'm trying to say is this post that I made is 100% legitimate and genuine.


    Yeah I do agree with the sentiment here that that's an extremely terirble build. You don't want someone who doesn't know what they are doing to get suckered into buying several generation old parts on a dead platform at that. You always want the best you can afford. I would go with an Intel 8000 series or a Ryzen.


    But is coffee lake even worth going for at the moment?? I'm not a "computer master" or anything but I know that there is less support for coffee lake at the moment.
  29. TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?

    A 1070 system will out preform a 1060 based system in FPS. However this system is otherwise constructed of better parts. Better CPU, a motherboard which is overclocking friendly, faster ram, a better case, power supply, and across the board better parts. In my opinion a better computer which will put up nearly the same performance from its video card so long as the gaming is 1080p/60hz. Also it will probably remain fairly relevant in a year or two when the video card is replaced.


    So, if I were to suggest him this build, what would he be able to upgrade in the future? i mean beside the basic ram, video card and storage


    Yes. It is an upgrade-able build, which is built out of slightly better than standard parts. His first upgrade is likely to be a second HD to backup stuff to. Everything in that build is upgrade-able. But other than adding a low-cost disk down the road, he is not going to need much in the near term to play at a standard 1080p 60fps.


    Hey, sorry for the late reply. i was busy with some stuffs. I have decided to go with your build that you suggested with that i5 and im gonna make sure that i make the best out of it. thank you for helping me out and being a great sport. :)


    I would suggest a change Delete the CPU, cooler and motherboard from my previous recommendation and go with:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $309.78

    Or this:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $409.77

    When I wrote the above a couple of weeks ago the coffeelake items were hard to find and inflated in price. Since then, the price and availability is much better.

    The top one will be faster than what I originally suggested and cost less. The lower one will be a lot faster and a little more money.
  30. TheDarkIce said:
    But is coffee lake even worth going for at the moment?? I'm not a "computer master" or anything but I know that there is less support for coffee lake at the moment.


    Yes it is. *ALWAYS* buy the latest platform you can afford - in this case it would be Coffee Lake or Ryzen. You do not want to buy a six year old system - you're obsolete already.
  31. bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:


    Wouldn't the other ryzen system perform better than this because of that 1070?

    A 1070 system will out preform a 1060 based system in FPS. However this system is otherwise constructed of better parts. Better CPU, a motherboard which is overclocking friendly, faster ram, a better case, power supply, and across the board better parts. In my opinion a better computer which will put up nearly the same performance from its video card so long as the gaming is 1080p/60hz. Also it will probably remain fairly relevant in a year or two when the video card is replaced.


    So, if I were to suggest him this build, what would he be able to upgrade in the future? i mean beside the basic ram, video card and storage


    Yes. It is an upgrade-able build, which is built out of slightly better than standard parts. His first upgrade is likely to be a second HD to backup stuff to. Everything in that build is upgrade-able. But other than adding a low-cost disk down the road, he is not going to need much in the near term to play at a standard 1080p 60fps.


    Hey, sorry for the late reply. i was busy with some stuffs. I have decided to go with your build that you suggested with that i5 and im gonna make sure that i make the best out of it. thank you for helping me out and being a great sport. :)


    I would suggest a change Delete the CPU, cooler and motherboard from my previous recommendation and go with:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $309.78

    Or this:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant
    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Cooler Master - Hyper 212 EVO 82.9 CFM Sleeve Bearing CPU Cooler ($19.99 @ Newegg)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $409.77

    When I wrote the above a couple of weeks ago the coffeelake items were hard to find and inflated in price. Since then, the price and availability is much better.

    The top one will be faster than what I originally suggested and cost less. The lower one will be a lot faster and a little more money.


    But would it still be in the 1000$ budget? bec hes still going to need to buy extra peripherals. sry im too lazy to do the maths. And also, is that 8400 worth going for? bec i see its 2.8 ghz. i know you could overclock it and all but is it really worth going for?
  32. g-unit1111 said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    But is coffee lake even worth going for at the moment?? I'm not a "computer master" or anything but I know that there is less support for coffee lake at the moment.


    Yes it is. *ALWAYS* buy the latest platform you can afford - in this case it would be Coffee Lake or Ryzen. You do not want to buy a six year old system - you're obsolete already.


    But the coffee lake has less support at the moment right? so i just thought to myself it just wouldnt be something to look at right now. i guess i was wrong, thank you for correcting me.
  33. TheDarkIce said:
    is that 8400 worth going for? bec i see its 2.8 ghz. i know you could overclock it and all but is it really worth going for?

    It can do 3.8 on all cores if enough power is available and more important if the temps aren't too high. On a "Z" board would it even be possible to run all cores at max turbo which is 4ghz,but a decent cooler would be needed since a kind of overclocking. A decent cooler can already be gotten for about $20 so not a huge investment.
  34. Vic 40 said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    is that 8400 worth going for? bec i see its 2.8 ghz. i know you could overclock it and all but is it really worth going for?

    It can do 3.8 on all cores if enough power is available and more important if the temps aren't too high. On a "Z" board would it even be possible to run all cores at max turbo which is 4ghz,but a decent cooler would be needed since a kind of overclocking. A decent cooler can already be gotten for about $20 so not a huge investment.




    Okay, i see. But im not too familiar with overclocking and stuff.. would you be able to explain how its done and / or what software is used?
  35. TheDarkIce said:
    Okay, i see. But im not too familiar with overclocking and stuff.. would you be able to explain how its done and / or what software is used?


    Overclocking is all done through the motherboard's BIOS and/or software that's included with your motherboard. It's a lot of trial and error though but when you get right down to it it's really basic math. You change your BCLK (base clock) speed to one setting, your voltage to one setting, and your RAM speeds and timings to one setting and that's it. Now the thing is all systems are different which is why you don't see people giving out a lot of advice on how to fine tune your exact build, but most components are generally the same in how you overclock them, but getting one component to a particular speed is where it carries a bit of skill.
  36. Looked into the manual and it seems that all settings are configured to make the cpu run at max turbo by default.So you won't have to change a thing afaik.
  37. g-unit1111 said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    Okay, i see. But im not too familiar with overclocking and stuff.. would you be able to explain how its done and / or what software is used?


    Overclocking is all done through the motherboard's BIOS and/or software that's included with your motherboard. It's a lot of trial and error though but when you get right down to it it's really basic math. You change your BCLK (base clock) speed to one setting, your voltage to one setting, and your RAM speeds and timings to one setting and that's it. Now the thing is all systems are different which is why you don't see people giving out a lot of advice on how to fine tune your exact build, but most components are generally the same in how you overclock them, but getting one component to a particular speed is where it carries a bit of skill.


    So basicly, i could buy that i5 8400 @ 2.8 ghz and overclock it. would it be better than that other 8600k? also, sorry for the late reply... im really busy with studies these days..
  38. I's not unlocked like the 8600K so won't go over 4ghz,but all cores should be able to run at that yes if cooling is appropriate. The 8600K should be able to go higher on all cores so no it won't be better,then again the 8400 will rock at 4ghz and i don't think you'll need more speed than that.
    You have to consider your budget as well. With the 8400 could you spend the leftover money at something different like a better gpu or M.2 ssd.The 8600K is much more expensive than the 8600K.
  39. TheDarkIce said:
    g-unit1111 said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    Okay, i see. But im not too familiar with overclocking and stuff.. would you be able to explain how its done and / or what software is used?


    Overclocking is all done through the motherboard's BIOS and/or software that's included with your motherboard. It's a lot of trial and error though but when you get right down to it it's really basic math. You change your BCLK (base clock) speed to one setting, your voltage to one setting, and your RAM speeds and timings to one setting and that's it. Now the thing is all systems are different which is why you don't see people giving out a lot of advice on how to fine tune your exact build, but most components are generally the same in how you overclock them, but getting one component to a particular speed is where it carries a bit of skill.


    So basicly, i could buy that i5 8400 @ 2.8 ghz and overclock it. would it be better than that other 8600k? also, sorry for the late reply... im really busy with studies these days..


    The i5-8400 is surprisingly fast. Sneaky close to the more expensive models. But, it can not be overclocked. The unlocked Intel chips have a 'k' on the end.
  40. bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    g-unit1111 said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    Okay, i see. But im not too familiar with overclocking and stuff.. would you be able to explain how its done and / or what software is used?


    Overclocking is all done through the motherboard's BIOS and/or software that's included with your motherboard. It's a lot of trial and error though but when you get right down to it it's really basic math. You change your BCLK (base clock) speed to one setting, your voltage to one setting, and your RAM speeds and timings to one setting and that's it. Now the thing is all systems are different which is why you don't see people giving out a lot of advice on how to fine tune your exact build, but most components are generally the same in how you overclock them, but getting one component to a particular speed is where it carries a bit of skill.


    So basicly, i could buy that i5 8400 @ 2.8 ghz and overclock it. would it be better than that other 8600k? also, sorry for the late reply... im really busy with studies these days..


    The i5-8400 is surprisingly fast. Sneaky close to the more expensive models. But, it can not be overclocked. The unlocked Intel chips have a 'k' on the end.


    So I should go for the 8600k instead now?? I'm really confused xD. Let me know which would give me more value for my money. Thank you :)
  41. TheDarkIce said:
    So basicly, i could buy that i5 8400 @ 2.8 ghz and overclock it. would it be better than that other 8600k? also, sorry for the late reply... im really busy with studies these days..


    The i5-8400 is a locked CPU meaning that it can't be overclocked. The 8600K is an unlocked CPU meaning that if you pair it with an unlocked motherboard (Z370) you can overclock it. All Ryzen CPUs are unlocked which means that you can overclock them.
  42. TheDarkIce said:
    bjornl said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    g-unit1111 said:
    TheDarkIce said:
    Okay, i see. But im not too familiar with overclocking and stuff.. would you be able to explain how its done and / or what software is used?


    Overclocking is all done through the motherboard's BIOS and/or software that's included with your motherboard. It's a lot of trial and error though but when you get right down to it it's really basic math. You change your BCLK (base clock) speed to one setting, your voltage to one setting, and your RAM speeds and timings to one setting and that's it. Now the thing is all systems are different which is why you don't see people giving out a lot of advice on how to fine tune your exact build, but most components are generally the same in how you overclock them, but getting one component to a particular speed is where it carries a bit of skill.


    So basicly, i could buy that i5 8400 @ 2.8 ghz and overclock it. would it be better than that other 8600k? also, sorry for the late reply... im really busy with studies these days..


    The i5-8400 is surprisingly fast. Sneaky close to the more expensive models. But, it can not be overclocked. The unlocked Intel chips have a 'k' on the end.


    So I should go for the 8600k instead now?? I'm really confused xD. Let me know which would give me more value for my money. Thank you :)


    If you want to go fast and save some money and you can live without overclocking, get the i5-8400. If you want to overclock, the 8600k is the best moderate cost choice. There is the i3-8350K as well (see review here on Tom's). The 'k' chips carry an additional cost of needing a CPU cooler.
  43. Best answer
    What i meant with "Overclocking" is that the base speed of the 8400 is 2.8ghz ,but it can be set to run max turbo on all cores which is 4ghz,which in it's own right is a kind of overclocking since it "only" should do 3.8 at all cores. It also means the 8400 won't do higher than 4ghz,which the i5 8600K can,but at this speed it's very fast and an imo better value for mony since the leftover can be use for a better ssd,cpu cooler,psu,gpu or case,whatever better to you liking.
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