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How do Optical Network Terminals work in a Home and answers needed for my situation.

My home's internet is installed using this ONT:
https://www.calix.com/systems/p-series.html
Specifically the 711GE ONT

I know that the fiber optic cables are attached to this ONT, the ONT's "ENET 1" port is then plugged into a Network Switch inside my house... and then from that switch, there is a router.

So what I want to do is plug another switch into the current switch, and then directly plugging things such as computer and consoles into the second switch...
What I am confused by, though, is-
Doesn't the router do all the work basically to get the internet to a device?

I found this Source:
https://facreationz.wordpress.com/2015/10/24/connect-computer-directly-with-ont-internet/

One part that I want answers for is -
"So when it connects to your ONT network, it connects directly and no other device can connect at the same time. That’s the router’s job."

So if I were to do what I want to do..
OMT -> Switch -> Switch -> Computer/Consoles
would I come across any barriers?
Would it work fine?

My ISP installed an 8 port switch so I'm not sure why else you'd need that many ports unless you can actually plug devices into it.

I hope I am clear enough for what I am asking...
If not, please respond and I'll try explaining better.
Thanks!
4 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Best answer
    Most the confusion is because a ISP if they wanted to could just use a switch and you do not need your own router but this is not a common install.

    Most ISP will not give you (at least not without a extra charge) multiple public address. Most you get 1 public IP and the first device it sees is the one to get that ip. The rest of the device do not get ip and can not function.

    So to run multiple devices you need a router that will get the single public IP and then share it with your internal devices.

    Now if the ISP really wanted to they could use private IP and NAT in one of their routers. The main downside to this type of install would be you now are sharing the "lan" with all the other customers of the ISP. They could gain access to your machines much easier.

    In general the ISP does not want to deal with this so they just give people 1 public IP.
  2. bill001g said:
    Most the confusion is because a ISP if they wanted to could just use a switch and you do not need your own router but this is not a common install.

    Most ISP will not give you (at least not without a extra charge) multiple public address. Most you get 1 public IP and the first device it sees is the one to get that ip. The rest of the device do not get ip and can not function.

    So to run multiple devices you need a router that will get the single public IP and then share it with your internal devices.

    Now if the ISP really wanted to they could use private IP and NAT in one of their routers. The main downside to this type of install would be you now are sharing the "lan" with all the other customers of the ISP. They could gain access to your machines much easier.

    In general the ISP does not want to deal with this so they just give people 1 public IP.



    So could I have a second router plugged into the switch, and then use the ports on that router’s ports for my computer an consoles?
    I also considered this and know I would have to disable something. So that it doesn’t interfere with my “main router”.
    (If this is the case, can you explain how someone would accomplish that?)

    My ISP is local so I’m sure it has that singular IP situation you were talking about.
  3. It really doesn't matter what you plug in the switch a router or PC. Only a single device will get a IP. So if you main router is plugged into the switch only that device will get a IP address. The switch is pretty much useless but maybe there is another reason they put it between the ONT and the router.

    It depends why you think you need a second router. Why can you not just plug your stuff into the main router.
  4. Kkody2 said:

    So could I have a second router plugged into the switch, and then use the ports on that router’s ports for my computer an consoles?
    I also considered this and know I would have to disable something. So that it doesn’t interfere with my “main router”.
    (If this is the case, can you explain how someone would accomplish that?)

    My ISP is local so I’m sure it has that singular IP situation you were talking about.


    The ONT talks to one and only one device, and serves up a single IP address. A single router.
    Your switch is doing nothing.

    You can have multiple devices and switches behind that router, if you need them.
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