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How to access 2nd router's setting page?

I currently have a Comtrend CT-5361t as my modem/router, along with a TP-Link C7. I can access the TP-Link settings fine by typing in my default gateway.

The problem is I have WiFi networks coming from each of these routers and I can't access settings for the Comtrend CT. How do I get to the settings page for the CT one? Thanks
12 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about access 2nd router setting page
  1. Sounds to me like you are double NATting. Both the Comtrend and TP are creating private networks and generally speaking a private network should not speak to another private network. There are reasons you might want to do this (ie .. keep your network private from a guest network) but in general it should be avoided. There are ways around this.
    1. Use a device that is on the Comtrend's wifi network to access the Comtrend.
    2. Make the TP just a router ... not a router/gateway.
    3. Make the TP network a subnet of the Comtrend network.

    The big question as to what is best, is why are you using 2 router/gateways.
  2. anotherdrew said:
    Sounds to me like you are double NATting. Both the Comtrend and TP are creating private networks and generally speaking a private network should not speak to another private network. There are reasons you might want to do this (ie .. keep your network private from a guest network) but in general it should be avoided. There are ways around this.
    1. Use a device that is on the Comtrend's wifi network to access the Comtrend.
    2. Make the TP just a router ... not a router/gateway.
    3. Make the TP network a subnet of the Comtrend network.

    The big question as to what is best, is why are you using 2 router/gateways.


    Shitty ISP literally just gave me the Comtrend and set it up this way
  3. darkbreeze said:


    I typed in the default IP address from the PDF, and nothing comes up in the browser. "site can't be reached". The I.P must be different?
  4. logic.c9cs said:
    anotherdrew said:
    Sounds to me like you are double NATting. Both the Comtrend and TP are creating private networks and generally speaking a private network should not speak to another private network. There are reasons you might want to do this (ie .. keep your network private from a guest network) but in general it should be avoided. There are ways around this.
    1. Use a device that is on the Comtrend's wifi network to access the Comtrend.
    2. Make the TP just a router ... not a router/gateway.
    3. Make the TP network a subnet of the Comtrend network.

    The big question as to what is best, is why are you using 2 router/gateways.


    Shitty ISP literally just gave me the Comtrend and set it up this way


    That is very common. My question is what are you using the Comtrend for? I am assuming you are trying to access it to do WIFI setup or something. If you are not using it at all, then then plug a computer directly into it and put the Comtrend into bridge mode. The Comtrend will become just a modem then and your TP-Link will do everything.
  5. anotherdrew said:
    logic.c9cs said:
    anotherdrew said:
    Sounds to me like you are double NATting. Both the Comtrend and TP are creating private networks and generally speaking a private network should not speak to another private network. There are reasons you might want to do this (ie .. keep your network private from a guest network) but in general it should be avoided. There are ways around this.
    1. Use a device that is on the Comtrend's wifi network to access the Comtrend.
    2. Make the TP just a router ... not a router/gateway.
    3. Make the TP network a subnet of the Comtrend network.

    The big question as to what is best, is why are you using 2 router/gateways.


    Shitty ISP literally just gave me the Comtrend and set it up this way


    That is very common. My question is what are you using the Comtrend for? I am assuming you are trying to access it to do WIFI setup or something. If you are not using it at all, then then plug a computer directly into it and put the Comtrend into bridge mode. The Comtrend will become just a modem then and your TP-Link will do everything.


    I just currently have one wifi network coming out of the Comtrend only, and was thinking about getting rid of it. I've plugged my PC straight into the modem and still can't access the login page, so I can't exactly put it into bridge mode right now.
  6. You need to re-read the instructions in the Comtrend manual. You can't just type an address into the browser with that unit, there are changes to network properties that need to be made. It is all outlined in the 3rd chapter. To be honest though, that unit seems like a terrible PITA and an unnecessary headache.

    I've never had to change any of the configurations in any of the Windows networking properties for any other router before like that one apparently requires. Normally, they can simply be accessed through a specific web or IP address.

    I'd just get a newer unit that has a lot more features that that thing does, spend five minutes in the browser configuring it and then never think about it again unless you want to.

    The unit I currently have, and I've had probably 50 different wireless routers over the years and installed at least 70 others, beats them all hands down. With MU-MIMO support and omni-directional beamforming I can get a fantastic wireless signal anywhere in my house, which is three stories of lathe and plaster walls, where previously I needed access points on the lower and upper floors or else I had extremely spotty signal strength and about half of each of those floors was simply a major dead spot.

    Obviously that's an extra expense but you can get a VERY high quality wireless router with an Intel wireless chipset (Not the cheap chipsets used by most routers anymore) that allows for true multiple simultaneous signals instead of the typical stop-go-stop-go method used by all non MU-MIMO units. It makes a huge difference if you have multiple devices that simultaneously connect, like phone, tablet, laptop or smart tv.

    Before, if we were accessing content on our Firestick and one of us started doing something on one of our tablets or laptops, we could tell right away on the tv. Now, everything is smooth. I used to dismiss the relevance of bells and whistles on wireless routers as having little benefit in real world application but after seeing what the advancements in these MU-MIMO beamforming units can do, I'd never buy a regular budget router again.

    And the model I had before wasn't a hunk of crap, it was a WNDR 4300 N Gigabit router, and it cost me over a hundred bucks when I bought it, but this unit I just got a few weeks ago has really been amazing and LITERALLY it took five minutes from unboxing to done, to set it up including the configuration.

    Probably as Drew has said you can simply get by with ditching one of those devices, or maybe not, I don't really know the specifics of why it was done that way or what devices you use, or what sort of distances you are needing to have coverage of, but if not and you'd like a recommendation on a good unit I'd be happy to drop a couple model numbers that I feel are rock solid choices.
  7. darkbreeze said:
    You need to re-read the instructions in the Comtrend manual. You can't just type an address into the browser with that unit, there are changes to network properties that need to be made. It is all outlined in the 3rd chapter. To be honest though, that unit seems like a terrible PITA and an unnecessary headache.

    I've never had to change any of the configurations in any of the Windows networking properties for any other router before like that one apparently requires. Normally, they can simply be accessed through a specific web or IP address.

    I'd just get a newer unit that has a lot more features that that thing does, spend five minutes in the browser configuring it and then never think about it again unless you want to.

    The unit I currently have, and I've had probably 50 different wireless routers over the years and installed at least 70 others, beats them all hands down. With MU-MIMO support and omni-directional beamforming I can get a fantastic wireless signal anywhere in my house, which is three stories of lathe and plaster walls, where previously I needed access points on the lower and upper floors or else I had extremely spotty signal strength and about half of each of those floors was simply a major dead spot.

    Obviously that's an extra expense but you can get a VERY high quality wireless router with an Intel wireless chipset (Not the cheap chipsets used by most routers anymore) that allows for true multiple simultaneous signals instead of the typical stop-go-stop-go method used by all non MU-MIMO units. It makes a huge difference if you have multiple devices that simultaneously connect, like phone, tablet, laptop or smart tv.

    Before, if we were accessing content on our Firestick and one of us started doing something on one of our tablets or laptops, we could tell right away on the tv. Now, everything is smooth. I used to dismiss the relevance of bells and whistles on wireless routers as having little benefit in real world application but after seeing what the advancements in these MU-MIMO beamforming units can do, I'd never buy a regular budget router again.

    And the model I had before wasn't a hunk of crap, it was a WNDR 4300 N Gigabit router, and it cost me over a hundred bucks when I bought it, but this unit I just got a few weeks ago has really been amazing and LITERALLY it took five minutes from unboxing to done, to set it up including the configuration.

    Probably as Drew has said you can simply get by with ditching one of those devices, or maybe not, I don't really know the specifics of why it was done that way or what devices you use, or what sort of distances you are needing to have coverage of, but if not and you'd like a recommendation on a good unit I'd be happy to drop a couple model numbers that I feel are rock solid choices.


    Okay I'll look over the manual. I can't exactly get rid of one of these since my TP-Link needs the modem. But the Comtrend Modem/Router is a piece of junk, so I am open to suggestions for a new modem mostly, maybe a new router although I just got my TP-Link one recently. When I got it it seemed to improve my internet actually quite a bit (my old router was horrible). When I got the new one, I did not seem to lag as much in games, even when other people where using a lot of bandwidth. But after about 2 weeks, I now sometimes get 300+ ping while on Ethernet, I thought the new router fixed the problem of so many people using up bandwidth, but its practically worse now than it was before. Especially considering sometimes I lag when I'm the only one on the internet. As of this moment refreshing this browser page spiked my brother up to 200 ping
  8. darkbreeze said:


    Yup that's it
  9. Best answer
    Ok, that's not a terrible unit either, somewhat comparable to the one I just replaced although that was a Wireless N750 (350+400) and not wireless AC like yours. It's too bad that you probably can't still return that unit because for the same price that sells for you could get one like this unit I just got. Anyhow, rather than get into an in depth discussion of the limitations of regular wireless routers, lets just have you read what MU-MIMO and beamforming DO, and why this is a big deal for folks who have many people accessing the wireless network at the same time.

    Just to be clear, your unit has neither MU-MIMO (Multiple user - Multiple In- Multiple Out) nor beamforming technology. Both are rather desirable.

    MU-MIMO

    https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/what-is-mu-mimo/


    Beamforming technology

    https://www.pcworld.com/article/2061907/home-networking/all-about-beamforming-the-faster-wi-fi-you-didnt-know-you-needed.html


    And just in case you are interested, this is probably the highest quality wireless router you can get for under a hundred bucks, and probably the only one for that price that has MU-MIMO, beamforming AND an Intel wireless chipset, which by itself makes a difference over low end chipsets.


    Amazon ($84.00)

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B075TJ8VNH/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1


    Ebay ($50.00):

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Phicomm-K3C-AC-1900-MU-MIMO-Dual-Band-Wi-Fi-Gigabit-Router-/152846457178?_trksid=p2349526.m4383.l4275.c1


    The only reason these are available for less on ebay is because there was recently a promotional deal on them with a promo coupon that knocked the Amazon price down to 14.99, and I bought three of them and I'm SOOO glad I did because I couldn't be happier with them. This was done on purpose to get the name out there or to deplete stock in advance of a new model release I suppose but anyhow, I'm sure a lot of folks took advantage of it and are now reselling them on Ebay for a markup but even with the markup it's thirty bucks less than on Amazon.

    Prior to the middle of last month, these were 140-160 dollar routers. Maybe you can sell the one you bought and recoup some of the price of it if you decide to upgrade.
  10. logic.c9cs said:
    anotherdrew said:
    logic.c9cs said:
    anotherdrew said:
    Sounds to me like you are double NATting. Both the Comtrend and TP are creating private networks and generally speaking a private network should not speak to another private network. There are reasons you might want to do this (ie .. keep your network private from a guest network) but in general it should be avoided. There are ways around this.
    1. Use a device that is on the Comtrend's wifi network to access the Comtrend.
    2. Make the TP just a router ... not a router/gateway.
    3. Make the TP network a subnet of the Comtrend network.

    The big question as to what is best, is why are you using 2 router/gateways.


    Shitty ISP literally just gave me the Comtrend and set it up this way


    That is very common. My question is what are you using the Comtrend for? I am assuming you are trying to access it to do WIFI setup or something. If you are not using it at all, then then plug a computer directly into it and put the Comtrend into bridge mode. The Comtrend will become just a modem then and your TP-Link will do everything.


    I just currently have one wifi network coming out of the Comtrend only, and was thinking about getting rid of it. I've plugged my PC straight into the modem and still can't access the login page, so I can't exactly put it into bridge mode right now.


    So, what is the purpose of the TP-Link?
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