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How much PSU Wattage do I need?

Components:
Ryzen 5 2400g
GIGABYTE GA-AB350N-Gaming WIFI
1TB WS 7200RPM
8GB(2x4) 3000MHz DDR4

Edit: I am using a HTPC Case
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about psu wattage
  1. a good 550w unit will be fine a 650w will cover any upgrades you may use. if you want to sli or crossfire latter on go with a 750w unit. look at the seasonic units.
  2. That system alone : a 450w. A 150w gpu like the 1060 or Rx580 would still be fine with that 450w.

    Till gtx 1080: 550w

    1080ti : 650w.

    Corsair cx450 cxm 450, seasonic M12 520,620 would be my budget psu recommendation. Corsair txm 550, evga g2, g3 or seasonic focus 550 for peace of mind.
  3. Realan H60 computer case Aluminum PC case HTPC for mini ITX motherboard without power supply
    http://s.aliexpress.com/zy6rUZzY?fromSns=Copy to clipboard
    This is the case i am using
    And it does not support standard psu
  4. Best answer
    Enter your ALL of system specs into PC Part Picker.
    It will tell you how much wattage your components require.

    Then double it for the PSU you should get.
    PSU's are more efficient when running at less than their capacity.
  5. 150w imo,120w would do.

    That case doesn't take an internal psu at all, needs an external pico unit or similar.
  6. Quote:
    Enter your ALL of system specs into PC Part Picker.
    It will tell you how much wattage your components require.

    Then double it for the PSU you should get.
    PSU's are more efficient when running at less than their capacity.


    That makes no sense. PcPartPicker already overestimates, since some parts don’t actually consume their TDP values and not every part will be at 100% load at the same time. OPs system will draw under 100w.
    Between 20% and 80% load the psu efficiency deviates only 2-3%, almost negligible. Especially when you consider high wattage PSUs are less efficient at idle loads, it’s even less relavent point.
    Not to mention higher price, noise, and damage in a fault with a higher wattage power supply.

    Don’t waste your time doubling or tripling your wattage, it will only cause problems. Get a good PSU that can support your current build and future intentions. Use reviews testing system power consumption to find how much you need.
  7. Rexper said:
    Quote:
    Enter your ALL of system specs into PC Part Picker.
    It will tell you how much wattage your components require.

    Then double it for the PSU you should get.
    PSU's are more efficient when running at less than their capacity.


    That makes no sense.

    Have you ever tried to do it that way or is that just your opinion?

    You would be surprised. Most PC components end up needing 250W-300W on PC Part Picker,
    Resulting in around a 500W PSU.

    Of course your mileage may vary and you should be reasonable about it.
    If a 150% PSU seems OK get that. One may be upgrading components down the road and who knows what your future needs are. I have been using the same PSU for years because the previous generation of GPU's used a lot more power than I need now. Therefore my PSU isn't stressed too much and still works efficiently.

    Trust me,
    I have a master degree in engineering.
  8. ^ engineering is nothing,to,do,with pc building though.

    That build is 100w tops fully maxed out.

    The issue here is that's an mitx case , it takes,an external,dc-dc psu , the biggest I have seen is 180w.

    In all honesty , I'd ditch that case, go for a branded silvsrstone matx or even matx that takes at least an sfx psu & preferably an atx.

    These mini nuc style cases look lovely & all but it's a massive hassle building with them with all the restrictions they have.
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