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Intel® HD Graphics 3000 vs with AMD Radeon HD 6620G

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October 15, 2011 4:34:02 AM

Intel® HD Graphics 3000 vs with AMD Radeon HD 6620G
a b D Laptop
October 15, 2011 5:30:44 AM

the 6620G is better
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October 17, 2011 8:09:34 PM

is the Intel® HD Graphics 3000 is good for gaming or not
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a b D Laptop
October 17, 2011 8:15:24 PM

if you are talking about games like WOW then NO. All most all newer games are looking for Radeon or ATI GPUs.

maybe some older games or facebook games will work.
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a c 121 À AMD
a c 462 D Laptop
October 17, 2011 10:32:39 PM

The Intel HD 3000 is marginally better than a desktop Radeon HD 5450. The Radeon HD 6550D graphics core in an A8-3850 by itself is faster than the desktop Radeon HD 5550, but slower than the Radeon HD 5570.

The Radeon HD 6620G is, I think, a mobile Radeon HD 6570 in asymmetrical Crossfire with the integrate Radeon HD 6550D. The result should be better performance than a desktop Radeon HD 5570; that should be a given since the HD 6570 itself is faster than the HD 5570. However, in total the performance should be less than the desktop Radeon HD 6670.
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a c 121 À AMD
a c 462 D Laptop
October 17, 2011 10:35:27 PM

^^^

That is my overall gut feeling since I have not really seen any asymmetrical Crossfire benchmarks.
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February 2, 2012 12:17:19 AM

im trying to decide weither SB hd3000 mgrphics will be enough to play sc2 and wow on medium-high settings. the a8 apu is said to beat the i3's hd2000 graphics but this is a $200 diference in mobo and cpu purchases. Can the apu's "cpu" be overclocked? Im pretty sure the gpu can be but at the same time im really attracted towards the SB on chip coding features
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September 4, 2012 2:33:08 AM

I don't know why Jaguarsxkz went on a whole explanation that never gave a proper reply to the question, but what he should have said was:

If you want to game, you get an NVIDIA card or an ATI card. Intel can go suck it because they don't know how to make a graphics card, or they just don't care enough to make a good one. They're all about getting the computer for the average user to work Windows and the internet.

Facebook games are not part of PC gaming. I don't care if they work or they don't.

If you want to game, get the Radeon 6620G. It's made for handling directx driven content and real-time rendering, which is what most games in this day and age run on.

I always buy laptops for the graphics card first, the processor second.

If I see a laptop with an ati card, I consider it. Then I look for a dual core processor of at least 2.0ghz. Preferably 2.3 or 2.4 for an affordable laptop choice. Then, of course at least 2gb of RAM to run windows 7. 4 or 6 being better obviously.

The laptop I describe buying should be within the 300-500 price range. Usually I will shoot to get it on sale for $300.

If you have $500-700 to spend, you can get a much better laptop with a really decent ati card, a dual core 3.x processor and 4-6gb of ram.

Remember. Graphics card FIRST. Hardest thing to change in a laptop is the motherboard, but of the 3 I'm talking about, the gpu is the hardest to change, followed by the processor, and the ram is the easiest.

So you can change your processor, but your graphics card doesn't have much room for improvement, so go with a good one.

Also, if you don't want hardware failures after 2 years of owning the damn thing, then buy from a good brand name. It matters because cheaper makes cut corners. Buy Acer, ASUS, Toshiba, Lenevo. Don't but e-machines, gateway, dell, or any other sketchy brands.

I bought an e-machines once. $300. Radeon 6250, 2.3ghz dual core amd processor, 2 gb ram.

After a year and a half, out of nowhere, it turned off, didn't turn back on. Found out the motherboard was fried. For NO REASON. I never used it on fabric surfaces, always gave it room to breathe and took care of it. But when you make a shitty laptop with shitty parts and you don't care, it doesn't last long.
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September 4, 2012 2:49:43 AM

Emerald said:
if you are talking about games like WOW then NO. All most all newer games are looking for Radeon or ATI GPUs.

maybe some older games or facebook games will work.


not trying to be rude but please stop misleading people.

Intel HD Graphics 3000 scored 3486 in 3d mark 06 (http://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-HD-Graphics-3000.379...)
Intel GMA 4500 MHD scored 740 in 3d mark 06 (http://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-Graphics-Media-Accel...)

i have been playing WoW on my dell which has GMA 4500 MHD for the past 4 years, it runs smoothly on low settings.
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February 1, 2013 10:05:26 PM

aimd said:
I don't know why Jaguarsxkz went on a whole explanation that never gave a proper reply to the question, but what he should have said was:

If you want to game, you get an NVIDIA card or an ATI card. Intel can go suck it because they don't know how to make a graphics card, or they just don't care enough to make a good one. They're all about getting the computer for the average user to work Windows and the internet.

Facebook games are not part of PC gaming. I don't care if they work or they don't.

If you want to game, get the Radeon 6620G. It's made for handling directx driven content and real-time rendering, which is what most games in this day and age run on.

I always buy laptops for the graphics card first, the processor second.

If I see a laptop with an ati card, I consider it. Then I look for a dual core processor of at least 2.0ghz. Preferably 2.3 or 2.4 for an affordable laptop choice. Then, of course at least 2gb of RAM to run windows 7. 4 or 6 being better obviously.

The laptop I describe buying should be within the 300-500 price range. Usually I will shoot to get it on sale for $300.

If you have $500-700 to spend, you can get a much better laptop with a really decent ati card, a dual core 3.x processor and 4-6gb of ram.

Remember. Graphics card FIRST. Hardest thing to change in a laptop is the motherboard, but of the 3 I'm talking about, the gpu is the hardest to change, followed by the processor, and the ram is the easiest.

So you can change your processor, but your graphics card doesn't have much room for improvement, so go with a good one.

Also, if you don't want hardware failures after 2 years of owning the damn thing, then buy from a good brand name. It matters because cheaper makes cut corners. Buy Acer, ASUS, Toshiba, Lenevo. Don't but e-machines, gateway, dell, or any other sketchy brands.

I bought an e-machines once. $300. Radeon 6250, 2.3ghz dual core amd processor, 2 gb ram.

After a year and a half, out of nowhere, it turned off, didn't turn back on. Found out the motherboard was fried. For NO REASON. I never used it on fabric surfaces, always gave it room to breathe and took care of it. But when you make a shitty laptop with shitty parts and you don't care, it doesn't last long.



:bounce:  Spot on advice. I follow this formula myself. Trouble is that laptop makers advertise to the selling points, CPU, GPU, RAM and HDD capacity. Unfortunately higher performance reqires more power. The poor old mainboard does not receive any attention and it's the most integral part of the whole system, so your advice to purchase on brand reputation is an excellent tip.
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