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HP's cloud computing

Last response: in Business Computing
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June 7, 2010 4:19:00 AM

i am not sure where cloud computing falls but.....


so HP dropped 9,000 workeres in favor of building a cloud computing center

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/Cloud-Computing-Data-C...

so what are your ideas about this?

it may soon cause more layoffs but is there any big benefit in this new technology?

More about : cloud computing

June 7, 2010 7:57:45 AM

Personally I don't like the idea of cloud computing at all. I'll be sticking with a regular desktop of my own the way I am now for a long time.
June 7, 2010 3:14:39 PM

I don't think we can possibly thing that we aren't going to the cloud at some point, but too often, I find that "cloud" is poorly defined.

I'm a greater fan of internal cloud computing (ie Virtualization - VMware, Hyper-V, Xen, etc), but it's difficult to think that some things will not go to the cloud.

One example the Spam filter and a Secure Web Gateway. It's impossible to protect primarily mobile users without sending the traffic through the cloud - we'd have to send them back to the office, then out to the internet - quasi VPN style. I'd imagine that could add some latency and be a bit ridiculous, and incur greater costs in bandwidth at the office.

I think it's unfortunate that 9,000 people are losing their jobs, but in some ways moving to centralized processing and management only makes sense. I like to keep things in house as much as possible, since I think the cloud can present some privacy concerns, but some thing are just going to move that way.
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June 7, 2010 8:51:21 PM

Cloud computing is for applications that need to scale.

Sometimes people need the reliability of a full enterprise network, but they can't afford the up-keep.

It's a poor-mans datacenter.
June 8, 2010 5:38:12 PM

In some ways it does allow enterprise applications for smaller businesses, but in discussions, it makes sense, at times, to allow a company that is an expert in one area deal with that traffic - examples are SPAM, e-mail, proxy servers, etc. Sometimes it makes more sense to do it that way, instead of having an admin split their time being a "jack of all trades," or instead of hiring more people to do that task.
June 9, 2010 3:13:13 AM

couldn't cloud computing increase the potential of desktop gaming?

what about RT? could this help? with the right servers......

June 14, 2010 2:36:33 AM

also wouldn't this weaken the overall security of a country with all the servers of companies based in one place, you could wipe out 2 or 3 banks in a terrorist attack.....
June 14, 2010 2:17:15 PM

Those are interesting points. I guess part of the benefit of cloud computing is using centralized resources, but you still don't want a single point of failure. I would imagine multiple data centers, or a hot-site to mitigate this risk.
June 14, 2010 2:23:56 PM

as well as cyberattacks.....
November 15, 2010 4:30:13 PM

This topic has been moved from the section CPU & Components to section Business Computing by Jpishgar
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