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Should I upgrade to Windows 8?

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  • Windows 8
Last response: in Windows 8
October 15, 2012 3:15:57 AM

I have some questions regarding Windows 8 and whether or not I should upgrade.

1.
Would all my old programs work? Like all my games and stuff. Would there be incompatibility issues?

2.
I use Intel Smart Response Technology. Would that still work?

3.
Are there any advantages for gaming?

4.
Any disadvantages?

Thanks,

EDIT: I am eligible for the $15 upgrade, so the price is irrelevant.

More about : upgrade windows

October 15, 2012 3:37:51 AM

I'm using windows 8 pro edition for quite a while now, and I'm happy.

1) Most of them work, but there are few exeptions, for example i am unable to upgrade my SSD's firmware(yes upgrade tool is OS dependent in my case), but i havent had any other issues with programs, even Age Of Empires 1, Dungeon siege 1 (these are old games) run fluently. I also think any mayor or critical programs will be made Windows 8 compatible, ex: drivers, firmware upgrade tools etc.


2) No clue, most probably, i think if not then there would be support in near future, as it launches in 26'th oct. You might want to contact your motherboard manufacturers support and find out.


3) Most games run the same as in windows 7, but some run even better, as windows 8 uses less resources, i'm talking about 1.5gb of ram usage vs 1 at same scenario, Windows 8 using up less resources. Well it's not an good example but i sometimes play Minecraft, and in Windows 7 my avg fps was around 70-80s, whereas in Windows 8 it is between 120-240.

4) There aren't alot. If you're >30 there's no reason to worry about the new UI, i know a lot are saying that windows 7 is the best but i think they're just grumpy grandpa's.
I had very few anomalies, for me having an old computer (like really old, laptop from 2005, PC from 2007), i had to manually sign my video drivers in order to get them to work. I think these kind of shenanigans are fixed after the release of windows or in an service pack update. Plus if your graphics card is from Nvidia you most probably have out-of-the-box support for windows 8. Me having Radeon 4850 in pc and mobility Radeon x300 on laptop, i had to tinker a bit.




PS! If to exclude bios unpacking time, my PC bootspeed record is 3s.
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October 15, 2012 3:54:18 AM

abbadon_34 said:
no



That's nice that you have brought up so many reasons why not to.

I swear consumer preview is nothing like the full release of windows 8.

You even get enterprise and ultimate functions like Bit-Locker, on just Pro Edition.
You get powershell 2.0
You get new Hyper-V, which, if you have SLAT support (2n'd-gen core series, ex i3, i5, i7), you will have almost real computer-like virtual machines. Hyper-V works on older processors as well, but the hardware-software layer is a bit thicker.
You get Storage Spaces, which is very flexible, and uses the new filesystem reFs, which is excellent with data parity, and most flexible software solution for managing RAID.
Manageability, manageability, manageability, manageability, manageability.
Everything is faster in Windows 8. And if you're not a 60+ pensionier you'll get used to the new UI.
Also i bet windows 8 will get faster and better with updates.
Lets not forget the powersaving features. as it was in Vista vs 7...
..I'ts like in 7 vs 8, you get about 30% more battery-life.

There are a lot of reasons to use Windows 8 and very few reasons not to.
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a b * Windows 8
October 15, 2012 4:15:53 AM

My quick answer is YES.

The bottom line is this is the future whether some of us want it or no.

I really, really dislike the entire new interface concept for a desktop computer, but then you will get used to it. Coming from Windows 7 was so frustrating, I had to go on the Internet and Google how to turn it OFF! I couldn't find things initially, and the left bar that shows the open programs was really stupid so hopefully it gets fixed (it showed a thumbnail for each program. No name, no icon, just an image. So I got a blurry white image that was apparently my web browser, and a black image that was the video I was playing that was paused on a black screen.

Sigh.

I really love the Windows 7 Task Manager, but apparently the new Windows 8 interface can be hidden away most of the time and you use your PC like normal (except no Start Menu).

So I guess I'm saying go with Windows 8 unless you want Windows 7 forever because the future is here.

Aside from the entire Windows 8 interface, the core of the PC is compatible with most Windows 7 software (not like the upgrade from Windows XP to Vista). It's like going from Vista to Windows 7. I'd imagine most Windows 7 drivers will work too.

*I would imagine the most frustrating elements will get tweaked.

I was going to recommend WAITING if you could while things get sorted a bit better but I think it's good enough now, and you don't really want to upgrade later when all your applications are installed.
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October 15, 2012 6:51:18 PM

Another question.

Would my games transfer over? It obviously transfers over "personal files", but are programs included? I don't even care about personal files such as videos and photos, I don't even have any other than wallpapers and clip arty stuff I've used in photoshop.
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October 16, 2012 3:30:53 AM

voiidwulf said:
Another question.

Would my games transfer over? It obviously transfers over "personal files", but are programs included? I don't even care about personal files such as videos and photos, I don't even have any other than wallpapers and clip arty stuff I've used in photoshop.




If it's possible you should backup your old data and do a fresh intall, uprading is for people who seriously want problems on their hands. "Upgrading is for masochists.": said our Windows Management lecturer on our first lecture. Things just work if you install a fresh copy. Even Microsoft knows that, they just can't officially enforce it.
Simple as that.

Well if the media your'e installing has enough room, you will have a windows.old catalog with documents and personal files.
Once again, fresh install.
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October 16, 2012 3:59:31 AM

Personally I'm gonna use the wait and see approach. There are some features that I really want, and others I couldn't care less about.

Time to fireup that virtualbox again I guess, after all RTM is free.
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October 16, 2012 4:01:10 AM

kristjan_i said:
If it's possible you should backup your old data and do a fresh intall, uprading is for people who seriously want problems on their hands. "Upgrading is for masochists.": said our Windows Management lecturer on our first lecture. Things just work if you install a fresh copy. Even Microsoft knows that, they just can't officially enforce it.
Simple as that.

Well if the media your'e installing has enough room, you will have a windows.old catalog with documents and personal files.
Once again, fresh install.



What is this windows.old you speak of? Is it a folder with all my old stuff in it? Wouldn't it get deleted during a fresh install?
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a b * Windows 8
October 16, 2012 4:04:06 AM

voiidwulf said:
I have some questions regarding Windows 8 and whether or not I should upgrade.

1.
Would all my old programs work? Like all my games and stuff. Would there be incompatibility issues?

2.
I use Intel Smart Response Technology. Would that still work?

3.
Are there any advantages for gaming?

4.
Any disadvantages?

Thanks,

EDIT: I am eligible for the $15 upgrade, so the price is irrelevant.


I have Windows 8 Pro RTM on my laptop. It's a surprisingly solid OS under the hood, even more so than Windows 7. Switching between an IGP and discrete GPU is almost instant. The Win8UI grows on you after a while, it's functionally very similar to the start menu but with icons that can be updated dynamically in real time to reflect an application's current status. I'm not sure how flexible the interface is but there's some serious potential even on a desktop environment.

The one thing I'm not sold on yet is the odd window theme, it's kinda pastel-ish whereas the Windows 7 theme is sleek.
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a b * Windows 8
October 16, 2012 4:19:10 AM

My experience with Win8 has been quite good(Minus my sound card not quite working right, but I hope that will be fixed in the future.).

Very smooth and all that good stuff. The windows 8 task manager is also a nice addition.

Metro is just another way to launch and run programs. You do not need to see it that often. It still has built in search just like Win7 so hit start and type what you want.

You can always try the enterprise evaluation(90 days to use it free) on another drive or partition to see how it works for you.

Win7 should work for many years if you go that route.
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October 16, 2012 10:02:00 AM

Meh new software is all good on fresh installs until you find its only mainly a add-on of windows 7 anyways with a few tweaks so wait till they put a sp on it and you watch ya frame-rate drop and back to how did it go grumpy grampa will be back imo try your frame-rate without window7 sp pack on and then with see what i mean as they only bog it down.

On a more positive note i can still see it being better than XP so i will be jumping now from this platform into the deep blue yonder of 8 myself also divers allays take a while for new platforms, Why i myself will be a little more patient you can just about here the war drum of the company's keyboards banging away to there deadlines in highrise buildings where the air Conn is down :p 

CAUTION watch out for people with new builds stating stuff that's faster as they will be mainly due to the new hardware :) 

And last thought of the day is do we all love windows phones enough that we want to look at the PC the same way :p 
and best off getting two one gig hdds if 1tb as over that your loosing speed :) 

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a b * Windows 8
October 16, 2012 4:50:54 PM

It's entirely up to you with any new OS there are occasions where a program or 2 will not work with the new OS. I myself wouldn't touch Win 8 with a 10 foot pole, it's decent for a tablet but i don't like at all on the desktop. I have a 40" screen i use my PC on and i prefer the classic window interface.

I don't think you mentioned whether you use Win 7 or XP. I'm assuming it's Win 7 with your setup. Run virtual software on Win 8 and see if you like it, i'd wait for the full version though to see whether all your programs work.
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October 16, 2012 5:00:40 PM

I wouldn't get it because it feels so alien to me. I played around with it at my work for a few hours, it was just... different...
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October 16, 2012 5:11:09 PM

it won't be an open platform anymore.
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October 16, 2012 5:15:27 PM

I just did an upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8. Everything came over just fine. The best thing you can do is at least pay the $15 for the upgrade. Even if you decide against using it, you'll still have the serial for whenever it's necessary to install it (or you can choose to install it on another computer, it's up to you).

I don't regret doing the upgrade. Everything loads much quicker, and I got used to ignoring the new UI (I just go to Desktop mode and run it all from there... everything I used normally had a desktop shortcut anyway).
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October 16, 2012 6:47:55 PM

nbelote said:
I just did an upgrade from Windows 7 to Windows 8. Everything came over just fine. The best thing you can do is at least pay the $15 for the upgrade. Even if you decide against using it, you'll still have the serial for whenever it's necessary to install it (or you can choose to install it on another computer, it's up to you).

I don't regret doing the upgrade. Everything loads much quicker, and I got used to ignoring the new UI (I just go to Desktop mode and run it all from there... everything I used normally had a desktop shortcut anyway).


Yeah. This is primarily a gaming computer anyway. The desktop isn't a huge deal to me. I'd use DOS if it would like double my FPS.

For $15 I think I'll get it and see if I like it.
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October 16, 2012 7:00:23 PM

voiidwulf said:
Yeah. This is primarily a gaming computer anyway. The desktop isn't a huge deal to me. I'd use DOS if it would like double my FPS.

For $15 I think I'll get it and see if I like it.


Keep in mind that this license is treated like an OEM license. They are letting you install it on whatever computer you want to install it on, not necessarily the one that you recently purchased. The OEM catch means that, once it's installed on a particular computer, it's tied to that computer forever. Make sure that you want to install it on that one.
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a b * Windows 8
October 16, 2012 7:49:05 PM

Keep in mind ..... this kind of "upgrade" historically has most often been a downgrade.

Upgrading on older box to a new OS was never a good idea if you expect any kind of ROI (positive "return on investment" of time and money). Historically, taking your existing box and "upgrading" to the new OS that was just released meant two things and only two things.

1. You could tell ya friends ya have the latest and greatest.
2. Your machine ran no faster than it did the day before, and most of the time it ran slower.

It started with Windows 95 with promises of "blinding 32-bit speed" but though PC Magazine's Hardware roundup did much to disguise it by separating the W4WGs machines from the Win95 machines by 100 pages, you could easily see that various manufacturers submitted machines with virtually identical hardware, one with each OS. The W4WGs machines on average were 40% faster than their Win95 counterparts. At the time, Infoworld conducted a survey of business users and they found that the average upgrade cost ran from $2500 - $4500 in hardware, rollout, downtime and training. No one re[orted increases in productivity.

History has shown us that nothing has changed since. Sure you could argue that getting rid of Windows Millenium and Windows Vista made you more productive if you were one of the many having problems with those OS's but on the testbed, even Windows 7 didn't do any better than Vista.

I'm not arguing that we should be buying new machines and putting Windows XP on them. The new OS's have more capabilities but these capabilities belong on new hardware. If you're a hobbyist and ya enjoy toying and experimenting with the new thing, by all means go for it. But if you're thinking my machine will run faster or you will becoem more productive.....well, MS has never been able to accomplish such a feat before. Maybe Win8 will be an exception, but history tells us it's unlikely. I would not consider it at all with a machine more than year old.

All I'd say is do some research, see how it benches, look at the time investment involved (don't forget ya time spent researching like here in the forum) and then see if ya like the results.
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October 17, 2012 11:45:40 AM

Sorry for being away for so long, windows.old is a catalog existing if you upgrade your windows. From 7 to 8 to try or install windows 8 on the same partition. Mind you upgrading is an option which should be avoided, you don't want your hair falling off in such a young age.
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October 17, 2012 2:35:23 PM

kristjan_i said:
Sorry for being away for so long, windows.old is a catalog existing if you upgrade your windows. From 7 to 8 to try or install windows 8 on the same partition. Mind you upgrading is an option which should be avoided, you don't want your hair falling off in such a young age.


The main thing I'm concerned about is my games. If I were to do a fresh install, (Speaking of which, can you even do a fresh install with an upgrade copy of Win8?), how could I keep all my games? I have like 250GB in games, and I'd rather not re download them all. It would go over my monthly allowance, and waste a ton of time.
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a b * Windows 8
October 17, 2012 3:29:57 PM

voiidwulf said:
The main thing I'm concerned about is my games. If I were to do a fresh install, (Speaking of which, can you even do a fresh install with an upgrade copy of Win8?), how could I keep all my games? I have like 250GB in games, and I'd rather not re download them all. It would go over my monthly allowance, and waste a ton of time.



I would keep your existing Windows then. You are going to need a back up of your data/OS as well. I have no idea how you upgrade to Win 8 and keep all your games. If these games are installed it might be a bit difficult to get them over to your installation, not to mention there's many registry edits you would have to fix. If you use virtual box and download the Win 8 demo you won't have to spend anything to try it out. I don't know how you manged to get over 250GB worth of games but as a reminder i would make sure to make a hard copy of the game install program. Anything you might have paid for usually would allow you to redownload the file so i would spend a bit of time to burn these games to cds/dvds.
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October 17, 2012 3:32:18 PM

nbelote said:
Everything loads much quicker, and I got used to ignoring the new UI (I just go to Desktop mode and run it all from there... everything I used normally had a desktop shortcut anyway).


Is shortcut icons on the desktop the only way to launch programs from the 'old style' view? What happens when desktop gets full?

OP, be aware that type-to-search feature in the Metro view only throws up files and Metro apps - not your desktop applications like games.
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a b * Windows 8
October 17, 2012 3:41:25 PM

JackNaylorPE said:
Keep in mind ..... this kind of "upgrade" historically has most often been a downgrade.

Upgrading on older box to a new OS was never a good idea if you expect any kind of ROI (positive "return on investment" of time and money). Historically, taking your existing box and "upgrading" to the new OS that was just released meant two things and only two things.

1. You could tell ya friends ya have the latest and greatest.
2. Your machine ran no faster than it did the day before, and most of the time it ran slower.

It started with Windows 95 with promises of "blinding 32-bit speed" but though PC Magazine's Hardware roundup did much to disguise it by separating the W4WGs machines from the Win95 machines by 100 pages, you could easily see that various manufacturers submitted machines with virtually identical hardware, one with each OS. The W4WGs machines on average were 40% faster than their Win95 counterparts. At the time, Infoworld conducted a survey of business users and they found that the average upgrade cost ran from $2500 - $4500 in hardware, rollout, downtime and training. No one re[orted increases in productivity.

History has shown us that nothing has changed since. Sure you could argue that getting rid of Windows Millenium and Windows Vista made you more productive if you were one of the many having problems with those OS's but on the testbed, even Windows 7 didn't do any better than Vista.

I'm not arguing that we should be buying new machines and putting Windows XP on them. The new OS's have more capabilities but these capabilities belong on new hardware. If you're a hobbyist and ya enjoy toying and experimenting with the new thing, by all means go for it. But if you're thinking my machine will run faster or you will becoem more productive.....well, MS has never been able to accomplish such a feat before. Maybe Win8 will be an exception, but history tells us it's unlikely. I would not consider it at all with a machine more than year old.

All I'd say is do some research, see how it benches, look at the time investment involved (don't forget ya time spent researching like here in the forum) and then see if ya like the results.


I think it depends. I had Vista on a machine, until i upgraded to Win 7 which is much better. It's still fast and if i went back to Vista on this same machine it might be slow again. I'm sure with Win 8 on the same machine it might run a bit better but with my i7 machine there is no difference. It ran fast on Win 7 and it did no better with the Win 8 demo. It depends with the initial hardware, you might be able to do more multi-tasking on a machine with less power with Win 8 then you did with Win 7. I have had people come to me before about problems with upgrading an OS on an old system that the hard drive wore out and they complain that their PC is even slower. An aged hard drive that either has bad sectors or it's old and clunky that wouldn't survive handling another 3, 4 years on an OS.
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October 17, 2012 3:46:56 PM

MidnightDistort said:
I think it depends. I had Vista on a machine, until i upgraded to Win 7 which is much better. It's still fast and if i went back to Vista on this same machine it might be slow again. I'm sure with Win 8 on the same machine it might run a bit better but with my i7 machine there is no difference. It ran fast on Win 7 and it did no better with the Win 8 demo. It depends with the initial hardware, you might be able to do more multi-tasking on a machine with less power with Win 8 then you did with Win 7. I have had people come to me before about problems with upgrading an OS on an old system that the hard drive wore out and they complain that their PC is even slower. An aged hard drive that either has bad sectors or it's old and clunky that wouldn't survive handling another 3, 4 years on an OS.


+1 to this. Metro is supposedly much more lightweight (makes sense I suppose with flat colours, no transparency, box shadow etc). Techradar has benchmarked it a couple of times, and there are minor gains for application and game performance (or 3DMark performance at least) along with huge gains for boot/shutdown times.
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October 17, 2012 11:14:02 PM

MidnightDistort said:
I would keep your existing Windows then. You are going to need a back up of your data/OS as well. I have no idea how you upgrade to Win 8 and keep all your games. If these games are installed it might be a bit difficult to get them over to your installation, not to mention there's many registry edits you would have to fix. If you use virtual box and download the Win 8 demo you won't have to spend anything to try it out. I don't know how you manged to get over 250GB worth of games but as a reminder i would make sure to make a hard copy of the game install program. Anything you might have paid for usually would allow you to redownload the file so i would spend a bit of time to burn these games to cds/dvds.


250GB in games.

~30 games. Between 5 and 20GB each. Average game seems to be about 9GB installed.(I am aware that the average of 20 and 5 is 12, but realistically there are more that are about 9-10GB.) 9GB X 30 = 270GB.




If I can get that homegroup thing working, I should be able to transfer all my games on to my old PC and then transfer them back after Win8 is installed. Most of them are Steam so I should just be able to use the "backup and restore games" thing to compress them and send it over. The homegroup thing doesn't work though. I enter the password and the bar just moves forever.
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a b * Windows 8
October 18, 2012 12:53:18 AM

Just use your old fashioned Windows file and Printer Sharing :) 

Always works.

Share the folder on the PC that is receiving allow everyone to write if it is a private network. Set the NTFS permission the same as they both have to agree or the more restrictive will take over.

If it is shared, just go to your system and when you connect to your pc, you will be asked for a login and password.
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a b * Windows 8
October 18, 2012 1:12:12 AM

sam_p_lay said:
Is shortcut icons on the desktop the only way to launch programs from the 'old style' view? What happens when desktop gets full?

OP, be aware that type-to-search feature in the Metro view only throws up files and Metro apps - not your desktop applications like games.


I'm not sure how it indexes other applications but it most certainly does search through the regular desktop applications like Calculator, RDP, etc... as well as most installed applications like Steam.
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a b * Windows 8
October 18, 2012 1:30:38 AM

sam_p_lay said:
Is shortcut icons on the desktop the only way to launch programs from the 'old style' view? What happens when desktop gets full?

OP, be aware that type-to-search feature in the Metro view only throws up files and Metro apps - not your desktop applications like games.


I would like to call BS on this part.



Steam games only get a shortcut if you tell it to create one when installing them(this applies to ALL versions of windows).
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October 21, 2012 3:17:58 PM

@JackNaylorPE - Of course W4WG would be faster than Win95. It had a much less complex (code wise) UI. It's codebase was considerably smaller as well. It was also designed to run on as little as 4MB of ram.

sam_p_lay said:
Is shortcut icons on the desktop the only way to launch programs from the 'old style' view? What happens when desktop gets full?

OP, be aware that type-to-search feature in the Metro view only throws up files and Metro apps - not your desktop applications like games.

Pin to the desktop or Pin to the taskbar....

Nice way to work some BS into your post... The search feature will find ANYTHING installed on your computer so long as it's not marked as a hidden file. The search function doesn't differentiate between "metro app" and non-"metro app". It simply sees files and applications.
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October 21, 2012 8:26:45 PM

I have been using Windows 8 for a while now, my thoughts:
- Booting, shutting down, standby are done 3x faster than in Win7 (this is especially awesome if you use a laptop.
- Metro style is pretty cool (on the apps that support Metro).
- Absolutely all the apps I use for my development work work in Win8, ALTHOUGH for some apps to work you may have to right click and select compatibility mode.
- Early gaming benchmarks show that Win7 performance = Win8 performance. No difference at all.
- However, computing benchmarks, like rendering, video processing, audio, compression, encryption...work 5-15% faster on Win8.
- The new IE in Win8 (metro style) seems to be much quicker than the Win7 version (although Chrome is still faster, and now it also support the metro style ))).
- The start menu alternative did seem odd at first, but personally anybody that can handle a small learning curve should be able to tweak it and adjust to it within a few days.
=> There are lots of new tweak and tricks that I am still discovering. But I would say that Win8 is pretty decent. I am not sure it will catch on as quickly as Win7 did because some people are just allergic to change and will not like the metro menu, but it is definitely better than Vista )...Performance IS better than Win7, it is the visual aspect that will challenge some.
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October 22, 2012 12:35:37 AM

deepblue08 said:
I have been using Windows 8 for a while now, my thoughts:
- Booting, shutting down, standby are done 3x faster than in Win7 (this is especially awesome if you use a laptop.
- Metro style is pretty cool (on the apps that support Metro).
- Absolutely all the apps I use for my development work work in Win8, ALTHOUGH for some apps to work you may have to right click and select compatibility mode.
- Early gaming benchmarks show that Win7 performance = Win8 performance. No difference at all.
- However, computing benchmarks, like rendering, video processing, audio, compression, encryption...work 5-15% faster on Win8.
- The new IE in Win8 (metro style) seems to be much quicker than the Win7 version (although Chrome is still faster, and now it also support the metro style ))).
- The start menu alternative did seem odd at first, but personally anybody that can handle a small learning curve should be able to tweak it and adjust to it within a few days.
=> There are lots of new tweak and tricks that I am still discovering. But I would say that Win8 is pretty decent. I am not sure it will catch on as quickly as Win7 did because some people are just allergic to change and will not like the metro menu, but it is definitely better than Vista )...Performance IS better than Win7, it is the visual aspect that will challenge some.


I decided to dual boot the 90 day developer preview thing on my old laptop, and I am enjoying it so far. Compared to Windows 7, it feels very fast on the cheap hardware. It just has a AMD E-350 1.6GHz and 3GB of DDR3. The interface formerly known as metro is alright too. It works for launching apps and stuff. My only concern with it is that its harder to get to the "settings"-ish stuff, such as "Computer", "Control Panel", "Disk Management" and stuff like that. To solve this I just made a folder on the desktop with all of the shortcuts in it and it works fairly well.

PS: If you are wondering why I didn't just dual boot it on my gaming PC, it is because I am getting an installation error when I try. It doesn't show any of my drives during the Win8 installation, and shows some error that says something along the lines of "No drives detected. Would you like to search for a storage driver?" or something like that. I didn't even know there were "storage drivers". I thought there was just the motherboard stuff, LAN, and Video. Anyway, [/rant].
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a b * Windows 8
October 22, 2012 2:28:14 AM

Yes, by all means get the Win 8 for $15 bucks, Gee less than 10 cups of Starbuck Java.
On Using win 8 Upgrade for a “clean” install.
Reason to do this is to retain your windows 7 for a time and do a dual boot with Windows 7 and windows 8. The best way to do this is disconnect the win 7 HDD, do the Installation of win 8 to a 2nd HDD. This way you have NO software Boot manager to mess you up. Hopefully the fixed a major problem, in that every time I booted to win 8, it would mess up my win 7 boot process (was easy to fix but very annoying – Reason I deleted it from my 2nd SSD and threw the beta disk in the trash.
How to do a clean install with upgrade version (unless MS disallows), See Link, My preference is Method 2 on Pg 2).
http://www.maximumpc.com/article/howtos/how_use_your_wi...

While I’m not a lover of the “Tablet style” interface, and yes I have both an Ipad and an Asus TF700.
It does improve on Boot time, my i5-2410m went from about 12, to 15 Sec for Windows 7 (128 Gig M4 SSD) to about 8 Sec on the 256 gig M4 SSD. Really nice But not a game changer unless you Boot frequently. As to program Load times, really going from say 50 mSec to 20 mSec – Takes a Mighty fine Stop watch to time. Besides this is more a function of the slowest component, in this case the SSD - assuming you have already upgraded the HDD.

Let’s see: I had a triple boot, Win XP, Vista, and Windows 7 Beta. Loved Win 7 right off the bat. I’ve had NO problem adapting to New OS’s from early dos -> win 3.1 -> Win 98 -> win XP -> vista -> Win 7. Normally started with the Beta version, if not as soon as it was released. One of the few that would even consider installing an SSD in a Pentium 133 running windows 311 (2009) – Yes it cost $100 for a LARGE 8 Gig SSD, replaced a whopping 2 gig state of the art SCSI HDD in 1999 -LOLs. I will probably get it Windows 8 (would defiantly jump on it for 15 bucks, but taking a more wait and see approach.

Reason for above paragraph is for krayzier1's grumpy grampa comment, Yes I turn 70 in less than a week – THAT DOES NOT MEAN I do not embrace change.

To continue.
However, if it were not for the Tablet market, I think windows 8 would join Win ME and VISTA for the following reasons.
1) Acceptance by enthusiast is rather Low. Compare the current polls on “are you migrating to win 8” and compare them to Windows 7. Higher for Win XP (or Vista as a lot bypassed Vista) -> Win 7. Remember also that the enthusiast market is a rather small market.
2) Consumer OEM market - Store bought systems. This will be great for MS and the same as it was for Win 7 all new systems will have win 8 (EXCEPT Enterprise systems). But here, Most who have already bought a Win 7 system will not upgrade to win 8.
3) Enterprise, or business, market. This is a Big market and projections are NOT that good for win 8. To see this you need to look beyond Tom’s and similar forums, Look to the financial sector and business reviews. This is the Biggest segment that “Killed” Vista. Windows 7 could have been a service pack to Vista; BUT MS had to dump The “name” vista to get business’ to buy.
4) Last is the tablet market, which should be good, at least for the apple haters (LOLs). Only problem here is the John-come-lately and completion is not just Apple, but also from Android Based Tablets (wonder if I could upgrade my Asus to win 8 and if it would be beneficial).

This is Too Long, time to exit stage left.

But have to add; voiidwulf Comment - "I'd use DOS if it would like double my FPS."
I'm Not a gamer. I still DO use Dos, That is basic professional. I need to track power on time and the number of on/off cycles for a satellite Instrument. This involves searching, sometimes over a hundred files (each file about 200 lines or more) On power on may be in one file but not powered off untill the next file. So I wrote a simple DOS based program that can extract this info. I also collect temperature and humidity data for the Cleanroom that the Instrument is in – You guessed it I wrote a program that will look at the Excel file and extract whenever the Temperature and the Humidity goes out of limits and at the same time rewrite the file to extract Hourly data as the data is stored every 15 Minutes, that about ¼ of original size.
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October 22, 2012 3:11:30 AM

Most businesses aren't going to "upgrade" to Windows8. That's a given and not something MS should be dependent on to judge success. A lot of companies are still running XP due to software constraints. A lot of companies are just now migrating to Windows7 due to those same software constraints. Most of those companies won't upgrade again until Win9 at the earliest.
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October 22, 2012 3:38:24 AM

One last thing. I'm not sure I understand this whole "windows.old" thing.

If I were to do a fresh install, would all my old files be in there, and it would just be a matter of copy and pasting them into their rightful locations? Like my Steam for example. Could I just go into windows.old, and relocate the entire Steam directory to my Windows 8 install and be OK?
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a b * Windows 8
October 22, 2012 3:56:11 AM

I have not done any installs that did not involve erasing the drive.

As long as you install steam first(so it can create any needed registry entries), then yes you can copy it right over it self.

Some games may have to be scanned for integrity, but for the most part, it should work. Any games that need something like DX Updates or XNA ect will auto install them again on first play.
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October 22, 2012 6:33:54 AM

voiidwulf said:
One last thing. I'm not sure I understand this whole "windows.old" thing.

If I were to do a fresh install, would all my old files be in there, and it would just be a matter of copy and pasting them into their rightful locations? Like my Steam for example. Could I just go into windows.old, and relocate the entire Steam directory to my Windows 8 install and be OK?



Windows.old catalog comes, if you do not re-partition your drive and install windows right into your old windows partition.

Again for the third time, I'd make a clean install and re-install everything. It's worth it.
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October 22, 2012 7:50:30 AM

The Windows 8 graphics drivers from both Nvidia and AMD are not very good causing crashes on many games, some drivers are better than others and hopefully the problems will be sorted out in the future. If I had to pay for a operating system then I would get Windows 8 for $15, but if I already had Windows 7 then I would not bother. It may be an idea to buy it for a future computer.
I recommend that you try the free Windows 8 Enterprise version of Windows 8 for 90 days to see if it works satisfactory with your hardware, in particular your graphics hardware and games.
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October 22, 2012 2:36:34 PM

kristjan_i said:
Windows.old catalog comes, if you do not re-partition your drive and install windows right into your old windows partition.

Again for the third time, I'd make a clean install and re-install everything. It's worth it.


I'll just do the windows.old thing. Really don't want to re download it all. I'm only allowed 125GB a month and I'm already at like 50.
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October 23, 2012 3:22:50 AM

The problem you're likely to run into is that programs that require registry entries won't be able to run because the registry entries won't exist.
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a b * Windows 8
October 23, 2012 3:10:16 PM

I would either get another hard drive or partition your existing drive. Keep your existing windows with that amount of game size there i just wouldn't risk it. Unless you have backed up all your data it isn't worth the hassle and the headaches. I think someone mentioned a virtual box program, that's the ideal way to go. You wanna see if you like Win 8 more then 7 first.

I don't know whether this option would work or not, but has anyone tried copying the registry over to another MS OS before? I imagine there might be a few problems in that though...
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a b * Windows 8
October 23, 2012 3:14:50 PM

MidnightDistort said:
I don't know whether this option would work or not, but has anyone tried copying the registry over to another MS OS before? I imagine there might be a few problems in that though...


This would almost certainly cause more problems than it's worth. It's definitely a nice thought, but I don't know of anyone that didn't go absolutely nuts sorting out all of their problems after attempting something like this (assuming they were also crazy enough to try it in the first place).
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October 23, 2012 3:22:06 PM

FYI! I just asked the question in Microsoft's community forums, about adding the upgrade to a retail version of window's 7. And it seems that that will change the license of the full retail version and tie it to the upgrade and that machine. although you can remove the upgrade and put it on another you will not be left with a full version of Window's 7 :o 
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October 23, 2012 3:22:49 PM

I've liked every new Windows version that has ever come out, even ME. I can't say I'm a fan of Win8. The way it's designed seems a little bit stupid to me. I'm all for redesigning how we use the PC but this would not be how I would have approached it.
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a b * Windows 8
October 23, 2012 5:25:29 PM

The_Prophecy said:
This would almost certainly cause more problems than it's worth. It's definitely a nice thought, but I don't know of anyone that didn't go absolutely nuts sorting out all of their problems after attempting something like this (assuming they were also crazy enough to try it in the first place).


Yeah i thought that would be a problem.

--

Another option if you have the money is to get another PC that has Win 7 already installed then upgrade that to Win 8. That way you can still keep all your games with the existing Windows.
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October 23, 2012 11:20:11 PM

I do sort of prefer 8 to 7. Not a huge difference IMO other than the new start thing.

As long as I can get my Steam library over I'll be fine. After that I'll just redownload all my small programs and delete windows.old.

Thanks,
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a b * Windows 8
October 24, 2012 12:23:38 AM

Steam should work out quite well once installed then copied over. I did similar for my Win8 setup(ok I used mklink to have it share with Win7, but works the same.).
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October 25, 2012 4:12:03 AM

The_Prophecy said:
This would almost certainly cause more problems than it's worth. It's definitely a nice thought, but I don't know of anyone that didn't go absolutely nuts sorting out all of their problems after attempting something like this (assuming they were also crazy enough to try it in the first place).

I've managed to do it successfully once....but it's not something I'd ever recommend anyone to try.
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