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Best program to Copy games Legally?

Last response: in Video Games
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August 17, 2008 10:06:20 PM

My brother is about to deploy to Iraq for a year and we obviously don't want the originals destroyed by the sand, so we were wondering what the best program to make legal copies of the disks is. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
-TPB
August 17, 2008 10:39:52 PM

ThePooBurner said:
My brother is about to deploy to Iraq for a year and we obviously don't want the originals destroyed by the sand, so we were wondering what the best program to make legal copies of the disks is. Any help would be appreciated.

Thanks,
-TPB


Imgburn will do it:
http://www.imgburn.com/
(Its freeware)

Bear in mind that most games run a check when they run (and will happy install from a copied disk). You need to patch the game executable(s) as these will check the physical disk.

So you need to visit Game Copy World:
http://www.gamecopyworld.com/

Nuff said!!

Bob
August 18, 2008 1:35:46 PM

Just for the info.

There is not a legal program to copy games, even if you have bought them and use them only for your own use. ONLY the copyright holder, or a licensed party can make copies for ANY purpose.

I am not suggesting that there is a particular problem with you doing exactly what you like, just letting you know the law is that FU**Ed.

Even your brother who is laying his life on the line for these suckers would be sued if they got wind of it. They just want your money. Fairness and justice take a back seat.

Related resources
August 18, 2008 4:06:37 PM

americanbrian said:

Even your brother who is laying his life on the line for these suckers would be sued if they got wind of it.


HIGHLY doubtful. "These suckers" usually don't bother suing individuals copying a few games here and there.

Usually.
October 14, 2008 12:31:44 PM

Tell that to the woman who was charged £7000 for copying a pinball game that cost £5

She won't back you up methinks.
October 14, 2008 5:42:41 PM

Actually, if you look at any of the big game piracy cases, they defendants were usually copying games and SELLING them to other people. In a recent one, the defendant had made $300,000 selling modified game consoles and pirated games. Honestly, I'd just suggest using no-cd cracks for your games instead, that way he won't have to worry about keeping a bunch of discs around either.
October 16, 2008 10:38:28 AM

I am not looking at the "big" cases. I am talking about a woman who downloaded a £5 pinball game from amazon and made it available on Kazaa or limewire or something.

Charged £7k for the offence. She isn't a big pirate. Just some average joe. Also check out the jamie somebody case got charged $200,000 for something like 21 songs. Just your average mum.

The law is broken. The corps. have too much power. This guy will not get a reprieve as I originally said.

It is NOT LEGAL. I am not saying it is morally wrong. I am stating FACT.
October 16, 2008 2:01:13 PM

americanbrian,

Your name is some what confusing as to what country you are from and which laws you are basing your statements on. Here in the US we have the "fair use doctrine" when it comes to copy righted material. It's far from a cut and dry law but what it basically says is that the original purchaser of copy right protected material has the right to basically do what they want with it as long as it falls under "fair and personal use". For example you can make a copy not only for backup purposes, but even for our own personal use as long as it is fair (you can't make a copy for yourself and then resell the original). I for example have copies of all my games on multiple PCs in my home. What I think you're confusing with law is the game companies own user license. There's a lot of crap in most EULA and TOSs that actually conflict with laws in various areas. In fact a very common disclaimer in most of these agreements is one that says that in the event that some clause or section is invalid the rest of the agreement still remains valid. Kind of a CYOA because they know a lot of the crap they put in there is not enforceable.

To the OP,
Your concern is legit and I've heard it from many in the military. Personally I like Farstone's Virtual Drive Pro.
October 16, 2008 3:15:17 PM

purplerat said:
Here in the US we have the "fair use doctrine" when it comes to copy righted material. It's far from a cut and dry law but what it basically says is that the original purchaser of copy right protected material has the right to basically do what they want with it as long as it falls under "fair and personal use".


Of course how valid that is under the DMCA and newer IP laws has become a matter for debate. Not whether it's valid, just whether it still exists with tons of corporate money buying all the legislation it can. All this noise about economic bailouts and yet Congress managed to get another copyright law through just last week.

Sort of like habeas corpus has become a nice idea, but only relevant at the government's convenience.
October 16, 2008 4:28:19 PM

Well like I said it's hardly cut and dry. But most of the "poor old grannies" getting busted did in fact go beyond reasonable "fair use". Usually what happens is that they download a song or something which in itself isn't the real crime. But since grandma doesn't know much about how P2Ps work she leaves that song in her shared folder and 100,000 others copy it from her. People try to make it out that she got sued for downloading "just 1 song" but in reality she got sued for distributing 100,000 songs.
Doing what the OP described is not going to get you busted. Could you imagine some game company going after somebody in the armed forces for simply preserving their software? It would be a PR nightmare.
October 17, 2008 9:56:16 AM

Sorry for the confusion,

I live in the UK, thats why americanbrian distinguishes me from other brians over here.

Also, your point about fair use doesn't cover your liability from "circumventing electronic security measures". Any game with DRM in any form will need cracked or to have it stripped during the copy process.

This makes the act of copying it "hacking" and you can be prosecuted under the computer misuse act.

The law is NOT on your side. You can ignore it if you want but that will not make you immune.

October 17, 2008 10:33:48 AM

americanbrian said:
Sorry for the confusion,

I live in the UK, thats why americanbrian distinguishes me from other brians over here.

Also, your point about fair use doesn't cover your liability from "circumventing electronic security measures". Any game with DRM in any form will need cracked or to have it stripped during the copy process.

This makes the act of copying it "hacking" and you can be prosecuted under the computer misuse act.

The law is NOT on your side. You can ignore it if you want but that will not make you immune.

In the UK it's legal to produce backup copies of your software for personal use, provided that if you sell the original media on you destroy the copies.
October 17, 2008 11:50:52 AM

Wrong again. They have introduced the same act in the UK. removal of protection is illegal.

Look at the REAL networks dvd backup court case as well. They remove the DRM and put in their own. Still illegal.
October 17, 2008 11:55:57 AM

americanbrian said:
Wrong again. They have introduced the same act in the UK. removal of protection is illegal.

Look at the REAL networks dvd backup court case as well. They remove the DRM and put in their own. Still illegal.



was just coming back to clarify actually. Just checked with one of my old workmates. It's illegal to work round copy protection, unless the product is no longer produced. Lets say you have a game that can't be bought anywhere else, then you are within your rights to make your own backup (at least in the UK). However if the manufacturer of the software is still publishing something, then they have a legal obligation to resupply you with the correct media if that has gone faulty within a "reasonable period", for a CD that would be about 10 years if the manufacturer claims about CDs are valid. That caveat doesn't cover accidental damage however. From his present job he deals with a lot of stuff about copyright, and he is of the opinion that publishers are d**kheads, and consumers are stupid.
October 17, 2008 7:15:38 PM

Quote:
Also, your point about fair use doesn't cover your liability from "circumventing electronic security measures". Any game with DRM in any form will need cracked or to have it stripped during the copy process.

Well now you're talking about another issue which is different from the cases you referenced above. I'm not sure I've known of any cases where private individuals were sued for circumventing copy right protection of content they legally purchased and were doing so only for their own personal use. Basically as long as what they are doing is within "fair use" there usually is not a problem. We could keep on going around in circles talking about which laws cover what, but I honestly do not think the OP is going to have any issues. Do what he intends probably puts a person at legal risk about the same as cutting the tag off a matress.
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