My Documents on different partition?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Can I put My Documents on a separate partition from the OS and retain
full functionality?

TIA

Robin
5 answers Last reply
More about documents partition
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Yes and yes. It's not at all necessary, but it can be a handy arrangement.

    But - and there's always a 'but' - you have to do it the right way.
    Different shell folders need different techniques to be moved successfully.
    Here's how to do it for My Documents, care of MVP Kent W. England:

    "Be certain that no documents are open before you start a move process,
    otherwise the move will be incomplete and your old folder will not be
    deleted. You will have to close open processes and then manually move any
    files that were not moved in the move operation. Best to do this right after
    a logon.

    One way to move My Documents is to right-click the My Documents folder under
    Desktop in Windows Explorer and select Properties. Move the folder with the
    Move button. This is the only shell folder that can be moved from its
    properties tab. Be careful to enter the path to the new "My Documents"
    folder, not to its parent. In other words, if you want the new "My
    Documents" folder to be D:\My Documents, then you must enter that string in
    the Target box."

    Ted Zieglar

    "Robin" <robin@despammed.com> wrote in message
    news:q0dcq0lv8t0sjlmc5tj23lma9n5t60e3v7@4ax.com...
    > Can I put My Documents on a separate partition from the OS and retain
    > full functionality?
    >
    > TIA
    >
    > Robin
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Thanks Ted. But on reflection, I guess what I really meant to ask was
    not about just My Documents but the whole Documents and Settings
    folder. I can see very real advantages in having this on another
    partition if a reinstallation is needed. Program Files too might be a
    good idea.

    Robin


    On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 14:46:16 -0500, "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com>
    wrote:

    >Yes and yes. It's not at all necessary, but it can be a handy arrangement.
    >
    >But - and there's always a 'but' - you have to do it the right way.
    >Different shell folders need different techniques to be moved successfully.
    >Here's how to do it for My Documents, care of MVP Kent W. England:
    >
    >"Be certain that no documents are open before you start a move process,
    >otherwise the move will be incomplete and your old folder will not be
    >deleted. You will have to close open processes and then manually move any
    >files that were not moved in the move operation. Best to do this right after
    >a logon.
    >
    >One way to move My Documents is to right-click the My Documents folder under
    >Desktop in Windows Explorer and select Properties. Move the folder with the
    >Move button. This is the only shell folder that can be moved from its
    >properties tab. Be careful to enter the path to the new "My Documents"
    >folder, not to its parent. In other words, if you want the new "My
    >Documents" folder to be D:\My Documents, then you must enter that string in
    >the Target box."
    >
    >Ted Zieglar
    >
    >"Robin" <robin@despammed.com> wrote in message
    >news:q0dcq0lv8t0sjlmc5tj23lma9n5t60e3v7@4ax.com...
    >> Can I put My Documents on a separate partition from the OS and retain
    >> full functionality?
    >>
    >> TIA
    >>
    >> Robin
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    I'll deal with Program Files first. Many programs, including most Microsoft
    software, will install a large portion of themselves into the system
    partition no matter what you do. Other software won't work properly, or at
    all, if installed in anything other than the system partition. That's
    because Windows expects to find application programs in the system
    partition.

    Moreover, it makes little sense to install software outside the system
    partiton, since the registry is part of the system partition. If you need to
    reinstall Windows you'll need to reinstall all your software anyway, so
    there's no real advantage to installing your software anywhere else.

    Documents and Settings cannot be moved en masse to a different partition,
    although you can move most of the shell folders (My Documents, Temporary
    Internet Files, etc.) to another partition. Before you start moving shell
    folders, ask yourself "why am I doing this?". In particular, moving shell
    folders is no substitute for backing up.

    Here is the entire article by MVP Kent England:

    "How to Move Shell Folders (and contents)"
    http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/xp_shell_folders.htm

    FWIW, here's what I have done. Remember, this is only one person's idea: I
    have My Documents, My Pictures, My Music and My Videos in their own
    partitions. I moved Temporary Internet Files to the partition where I store
    my backups. And I moved my (Outlook Express) message store and my address
    book to My Documents. I didn't need to do any of this; it's just for
    convenience when backing up.
    --
    Ted Zieglar


    "Robin" <robin@despammed.com> wrote in message
    news:kspeq0de47t4jumcedo3ip29jcveojgvuj@4ax.com...
    > Thanks Ted. But on reflection, I guess what I really meant to ask was
    > not about just My Documents but the whole Documents and Settings
    > folder. I can see very real advantages in having this on another
    > partition if a reinstallation is needed. Program Files too might be a
    > good idea.
    >
    > Robin
    >
    >
    > On Thu, 25 Nov 2004 14:46:16 -0500, "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Yes and yes. It's not at all necessary, but it can be a handy
    arrangement.
    > >
    > >But - and there's always a 'but' - you have to do it the right way.
    > >Different shell folders need different techniques to be moved
    successfully.
    > >Here's how to do it for My Documents, care of MVP Kent W. England:
    > >
    > >"Be certain that no documents are open before you start a move process,
    > >otherwise the move will be incomplete and your old folder will not be
    > >deleted. You will have to close open processes and then manually move any
    > >files that were not moved in the move operation. Best to do this right
    after
    > >a logon.
    > >
    > >One way to move My Documents is to right-click the My Documents folder
    under
    > >Desktop in Windows Explorer and select Properties. Move the folder with
    the
    > >Move button. This is the only shell folder that can be moved from its
    > >properties tab. Be careful to enter the path to the new "My Documents"
    > >folder, not to its parent. In other words, if you want the new "My
    > >Documents" folder to be D:\My Documents, then you must enter that string
    in
    > >the Target box."
    > >
    > >Ted Zieglar
    > >
    > >"Robin" <robin@despammed.com> wrote in message
    > >news:q0dcq0lv8t0sjlmc5tj23lma9n5t60e3v7@4ax.com...
    > >> Can I put My Documents on a separate partition from the OS and retain
    > >> full functionality?
    > >>
    > >> TIA
    > >>
    > >> Robin
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Thanks very much Ted. A very comprehensive picture.

    As for mail, I don't use Outlook Express (except as a backup store),
    but Eudora, and I store all the non-program files on a dedicated
    partition. It's then easy to access mail from different desktops. I
    know it can be done with OE but it's more complicated and I once lost
    some mail by getting it wrong.

    Thanks again

    Robin

    On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 12:54:19 -0500, "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com>
    wrote:

    >I'll deal with Program Files first. Many programs, including most Microsoft
    >software, will install a large portion of themselves into the system
    >partition no matter what you do. Other software won't work properly, or at
    >all, if installed in anything other than the system partition. That's
    >because Windows expects to find application programs in the system
    >partition.
    >
    >Moreover, it makes little sense to install software outside the system
    >partiton, since the registry is part of the system partition. If you need to
    >reinstall Windows you'll need to reinstall all your software anyway, so
    >there's no real advantage to installing your software anywhere else.
    >
    >Documents and Settings cannot be moved en masse to a different partition,
    >although you can move most of the shell folders (My Documents, Temporary
    >Internet Files, etc.) to another partition. Before you start moving shell
    >folders, ask yourself "why am I doing this?". In particular, moving shell
    >folders is no substitute for backing up.
    >
    >Here is the entire article by MVP Kent England:
    >
    >"How to Move Shell Folders (and contents)"
    >http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/xp_shell_folders.htm
    >
    >FWIW, here's what I have done. Remember, this is only one person's idea: I
    >have My Documents, My Pictures, My Music and My Videos in their own
    >partitions. I moved Temporary Internet Files to the partition where I store
    >my backups. And I moved my (Outlook Express) message store and my address
    >book to My Documents. I didn't need to do any of this; it's just for
    >convenience when backing up.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    If what you are concerned about is a system crash or just having to
    reinstall, I suggest using something like ghost or any imaging program. I
    have 3 partitions on my HD, with the OS on C, Programs on D and data on E.
    I have placed ghost images on both DVD and also on the data drive. I can
    restore the images in much less time than it takes to reinstall XP. The
    last time I restored my C and D drives it only took about 20 minutes and
    sure is faster and easier than reinstalling XP and much more reliable then
    using the XP restore feature.

    Good luck
    "Robin" <robin@despammed.com> wrote in message
    news:u43hq0dkr3ak4s6ilhu8ifo1uve13f1fii@4ax.com...
    > Thanks very much Ted. A very comprehensive picture.
    >
    > As for mail, I don't use Outlook Express (except as a backup store),
    > but Eudora, and I store all the non-program files on a dedicated
    > partition. It's then easy to access mail from different desktops. I
    > know it can be done with OE but it's more complicated and I once lost
    > some mail by getting it wrong.
    >
    > Thanks again
    >
    > Robin
    >
    > On Fri, 26 Nov 2004 12:54:19 -0500, "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>I'll deal with Program Files first. Many programs, including most
    >>Microsoft
    >>software, will install a large portion of themselves into the system
    >>partition no matter what you do. Other software won't work properly, or at
    >>all, if installed in anything other than the system partition. That's
    >>because Windows expects to find application programs in the system
    >>partition.
    >>
    >>Moreover, it makes little sense to install software outside the system
    >>partiton, since the registry is part of the system partition. If you need
    >>to
    >>reinstall Windows you'll need to reinstall all your software anyway, so
    >>there's no real advantage to installing your software anywhere else.
    >>
    >>Documents and Settings cannot be moved en masse to a different partition,
    >>although you can move most of the shell folders (My Documents, Temporary
    >>Internet Files, etc.) to another partition. Before you start moving shell
    >>folders, ask yourself "why am I doing this?". In particular, moving shell
    >>folders is no substitute for backing up.
    >>
    >>Here is the entire article by MVP Kent England:
    >>
    >>"How to Move Shell Folders (and contents)"
    >>http://www.kellys-korner-xp.com/xp_shell_folders.htm
    >>
    >>FWIW, here's what I have done. Remember, this is only one person's idea: I
    >>have My Documents, My Pictures, My Music and My Videos in their own
    >>partitions. I moved Temporary Internet Files to the partition where I
    >>store
    >>my backups. And I moved my (Outlook Express) message store and my address
    >>book to My Documents. I didn't need to do any of this; it's just for
    >>convenience when backing up.
    >
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