Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question
Closed

Xbox 360 Version of Fallout 3 Leaked

Last response: in Video Games
Share
October 10, 2008 6:01:42 PM

I wonder how the developers who say that the PC is the most pirated system out there feels about this...

Care to comment Cryteck or Ubisoft?
October 10, 2008 6:22:58 PM

In an interesting development, people are actually fighting the distribution of this torrent by uploading corrupt versions of the iso that that anyone whom torrents from them get stuck at 99.9%... that's right, Pirates fighting Pirates.

Related resources
October 10, 2008 6:32:59 PM

It really is a shame to pirate this game. Give credit where credit it due and buy the game.
October 10, 2008 6:56:09 PM

I will buy this game as it is definitely worthy of a purchase, but I can't help but sit here and grin about this situation. Don't get me wrong, as I stated before Bethesda is a great company that I respect and Fallout 3 is going to be an awesome game. However, I love how a lot of companies lately have been complaining so adamantly that piracy is killing the PC platform. It's seemed like they have turned a blind eye towards console piracy and it is going to hit them like a truck soon. If they believe that moving off the PC platform to consoles is a solution to stop piracy they are in for a world of hurt. Console games have been pirated since the Playstation was introduced so this is no new development. I think the reason that console piracy is becoming a more obvious problem is that people are starting to pirate it a lot more. As fewer games get released for the PC, these PC pirates are going to move to the console and do the same thing. The main draw of pirating a console version of a game is that you can still play it online with other legitimate users. The PC versions are not capable of this because each one requires a unique serial key. Once you get a firmware modification or chip installed, console piracy is totally unlocked because there are no protections.

Have fun devs/publishers, DRM and the slowing of the PC platform has brought this on you. There are no other platform options left. :lol: 
October 10, 2008 7:07:13 PM

As Travis sarcastically stated upon hearing this news, "That will teach you developers to make a game we want! We'll go an pirate it! Yay!!!!!"

I cannot believe how some gamers treat the companies that make the games they love. And then to go online and boast about with video and screenshots? This is just sad and pathetic....
October 10, 2008 7:29:25 PM

Quote:
As Travis sarcastically stated upon hearing this news, "That will teach you developers to make a game we want! We'll go an pirate it! Yay!!!!!"

I cannot believe how some gamers treat the companies that make the games they love. And then to go online and boast about with video and screenshots? This is just sad and pathetic....


Yes, who would have thought spending millions on advertising, splattering images on billboards, in magazines and hyping up a game for 3 years would drive fans into a frenzy for the product.

At the end of the day, it wont truly hurt Beths sales. Fans who wanted the game will still buy the game, and people that had no intention of ever buying the game will have torrented it eventually, rented it or simply never played it.

If Fallout 3 lives up to even half of the hype, I am confident it will be the best selling game of 2008.
October 10, 2008 8:15:20 PM

Even though I feel bad for bethesda getting their game pirated (especially because it has the potential to be Game of the Year), I'm actually happy that these kind of news are spreading about console piracy to the developers and publishers, since they chose to turn a blind eye to it and only focus on PC. Like a guy above me said, it's gonna hit them like a truck and it won't be pretty when it happens.
October 10, 2008 9:29:56 PM

This is a really unfortunate situation no matter what. I really wish Bethesda luck in finding the source of the leak, they worked their butts off on this game.
October 10, 2008 9:36:15 PM

There was never any doubt that console piracy would eventually reach the level of PC piracy. I must say I'm a little surprised it's becoming this public this soon. I'm sure the next editions of game consoles will up the ante which will further spur pirates to do their thing. A never ending story indeed.
October 10, 2008 9:43:00 PM

I think in most cases people do this to get the game first as opposed to getting it free.
October 10, 2008 9:50:09 PM

I just want to hear a response from some of the big publishers as someone already said on console piracy. Hopefully this is a turning point where they realize that punishing the pc gamer is not the way to go, because it solves nothing. I would think that simple online verification of the console games could alleviate some of this. But then people would complain who don't/can't hook their consoles up to the internet. This could mean trouble for everyone in the future. Let's all hope not though.
October 11, 2008 12:23:52 AM

I'm very tempted to download a pirate version of this but i'm not going to - i'd much rather pay my £40 to encourage Bethesda to keep creating fantastic games :) 
October 11, 2008 2:34:12 PM

I'm not interested in flashing my Xbox360, and I think Bethesda is a developer worth supporting. I currently don't plan on getting this game because it sounds like it's really just Oblivion in a Fallout setting. There are too many other titles coming out, but I may end up picking up Fallout 3 if the reviews are very good.
October 11, 2008 5:56:23 PM

based on the gameplay videos I saw, I am going to buy the game when it comes out

this wont really effect sales for the game as console games get pirated like crazy, (they get pirated more than many pc games)

while a smaller percentage of the console gaming community pirate the games, there so many console gamers that in theres of number of people pirating the game, there much more pirates in console gaming than with pc games

console games still sell more than pc games because the drm is not really noticed by the average gamer and theres no need to worry about system requirements (with a pc game, even though there over 4 billion computers out there, only about 500 thousand to 1 million are able to actually run the games, and out of those users, many of them may not be interested in the game so there even less people who fit your target market.

with consoles , if 10 million people have a xbox 360 then your target market is 10 million as there all able to run it while not all may be interested in your game, the target is so large that your bound to make a lot of money
October 12, 2008 1:27:26 AM

Ok..
Enough is enough... I have never posted a response on the issue of content piracy. Strangely this of all things has me irritated enough to get me off my lazy a** and say something. Though I am sure know one will listen.

For the record I do not pirate. Every piece of media I have I purchased or was free promotional material. When that is not the case I produced the content myself.

That said, I think everyone knows someone who downloads whatever they want, with no intention of ever paying for it. We all know at least one person of this type. They think it's great that they don't pay for content, because why should they? when they can get it for free. These same people are always ready to charge for whatever product or service they provide. So let me be clear about the type of person I am talking about. They have no respect for the value of other people. That's right, they are "SCUM".

Before everyone gets in a tizzy about, it not being people the "SCUM" don't respect, it's the corporation they work for. Well that is cold comfort when people loose there jobs because corporate revenue drops because of piracy. Not to mention the fact that content production value goes down in order to bring cost in line with margins. That is bad for people who want high quality content.

As for those who say, if I like the content I will buy it. I have noticed a funny trend, they very rarely like anything enough to go out and buy it. Well in the case of games they might have been into it for a while, but after playing it through several times it is just not as much fun to play as they originally thought. Certainly not worth going out and purchasing.

Now I admit, getting to try something before you buy it is a good marketing strategy. Boy does that ever create a buzz. So why not let the pirates do the marketing for your content. There are those who say that would increase overall sales. Funny thing happens when asked for credible metrics to back up that assertion. Those same people can't come up with anything better that anecdotal and subjective comments that are more flimsy that wet rice paper.

I agree that there is little evidence on the other side either. I mean it is hard to prove that you would have had better sales if there were no piracy. That's because there is piracy. Worse there are "SCUM" out there who don't give two squirts of p*ss about anything that isn't them.

So if you havn't guessed by now, I am angry. I am angry because Bethesda produces some the very best content. It would be a shame if they had to forgo producing the great games they make for something with lower production cost "less risk", because the pirates and the "SCUM" could not keep there dirty, thoughtless and thieving
hands off.

I have been patiently waiting for "fallout 3". I am stoked to play the game, and later this month I will show all the talented people at Bethesda how grateful I am for what they are doing. I will go out and buy "Fallout 3". Which is more than the vast majority of the people who have "already stolen it" will do.

I hope they're are enough people of good conscience out there to prevent Bethesda from re-thinking the way they produce games. I for one, would be very disappointed if "Fallout 3" was the last great title from Bethesda. I would really like to see another Elder Scrolls. Let's hope the "SCUM" don't prevent the rest of us from getting to enjoy that.

October 12, 2008 3:46:42 AM

Quote:
As for those who say, if I like the content I will buy it. I have noticed a funny trend, they very rarely like anything enough to go out and buy it. Well in the case of games they might have been into it for a while, but after playing it through several times it is just not as much fun to play as they originally thought. Certainly not worth going out and purchasing.

Now I admit, getting to try something before you buy it is a good marketing strategy. Boy does that ever create a buzz. So why not let the pirates do the marketing for your content. There are those who say that would increase overall sales. Funny thing happens when asked for credible metrics to back up that assertion. Those same people can't come up with anything better that anecdotal and subjective comments that are more flimsy that wet rice paper.


Gal Civ anyone?

October 12, 2008 4:32:56 AM

i am with mad cow on this. developers spend years to make a master piece game. torrenting a game that to a developer is like a work of art really shows a lack of respect for the developer and their work.
October 12, 2008 4:48:02 AM

It is amazing to me that the story about this is just now breaking. I have a friend who modded his Xbox within the first day of having it and it took him about 15 min to do. (He has no knowledge as to how to build a computer either by the way, he doesnt even know who nvidia or ATI are). He got his 360 about 6 months after its release and to this day has NEVER purchased a game. A

About 90% of the time he has them anywhere from 1 week to 1 month before they release without any issues and can easily play online/get updates as if it were the retail version, so I just dont understand why this hasnt been seen in the media until now when the PC issue is so prevalent. Actually it borderline makes me upset to be honest. lol

P.S. I do not condone the actions of my friend in anyway...just pointing it out.

Best,

3Ball
October 12, 2008 5:18:31 AM

I think people overreact and overexaggerate about piracy. People are going to pirate games. Nothing you can do to stop it. I think game companies spend more money trying to combat piracy than they actually lose from actual lost sales.
October 12, 2008 11:56:36 AM

3Ball, I've known people like that myself, and I know what you're talking about. Consoles have been hit by piracy for a very long time, and I find it very frustrating when I see comments at times from people (including some developers) where they act like piracy is a PC problem. The specific guy I knew had been pirating everything under the sun for every console out there. Xbox, PS2, Dreamcast, DS, PSP, Wii, 360, etc.

Granted, not everyone is going to feel comfortable chipping a console or flashing firmware on their 360, but there are probably more people now than ever that are selling modding services through public sites like Craigslist, or even people selling pre-modified consoles on Ebay. Modding services and pre-modded consoles make piracy much more available to those who don't understand the process, or doing feel comfortable doing it themselves.

I've seen arguments that people who take advantage of a modding service or pre-modified console then have to figure out where to download the games and how to burn them, but there are even people who sell pre-burned games as well on public sites. It takes all of the brainwork out of it.
October 12, 2008 6:56:47 PM

ryanlord said:
3Ball, I've known people like that myself, and I know what you're talking about. Consoles have been hit by piracy for a very long time, and I find it very frustrating when I see comments at times from people (including some developers) where they act like piracy is a PC problem. The specific guy I knew had been pirating everything under the sun for every console out there. Xbox, PS2, Dreamcast, DS, PSP, Wii, 360, etc.

Granted, not everyone is going to feel comfortable chipping a console or flashing firmware on their 360, but there are probably more people now than ever that are selling modding services through public sites like Craigslist, or even people selling pre-modified consoles on Ebay. Modding services and pre-modded consoles make piracy much more available to those who don't understand the process, or doing feel comfortable doing it themselves.

I've seen arguments that people who take advantage of a modding service or pre-modified console then have to figure out where to download the games and how to burn them, but there are even people who sell pre-burned games as well on public sites. It takes all of the brainwork out of it.


Yea, it is most definitely easier and more accessible that it seems alot of people believe. Ex: Most game devs?

Best,

3Ball
October 13, 2008 3:22:03 AM

As a strictly PC gamer, this article had me dancing. I've had to wait months for GTA4 to arrive, I'm still not 100% convinced its going to hit PCs this month. (last I heard, late Oct was the release date) All I hear is how PC games are stolen, pirated, copied, etc. Its just as easy to do the same thing with a PS2/3, or Xbox, but you nearly never hear of it. Wake up developers, stop punishing the PC market simply because your to stupid to realize that its happening elsewhere.
October 13, 2008 4:06:32 PM

Well lets see, just taking figures from a popular torrent site.

Xbox 360: 156 games available for download via Torrent
PS3: 9 games available for download via Torrent
PC: 5,078 games available to download via Torrent

While that is a lot, the PC section has 3-10 torrents per game title, where as the 360 only has 1 torrent per game.

However, a 360 game is downloaded 300-700 times per torrent.
A PC game between 2000-320,000 per torrent.

The completed downloads from a single Elder Scrolls: Oblivion torrent alone equals the total amount of times that all the 360 & PS3 games were downloaded together.

Now add up all the total downloads for Oblivion (All the torrents) and it almost doubles the total 360 & PS3 downloads.

Now times that by 5000 and you start to see why PC piracy is a significantly greater threat than console piracy.

I see 40 total completed downloads for Fallout 3, more copies of Fallout 3 will be stolen by Gamestop employees and teens with bad haircuts than have so far been torrented.

In order to use a downloaded game on a 360 or PS3, you have to mod the system, which involves buying and installing a mod chip which will forever void the warranty. When a system is first launched and for several years after, the mod chips are fairly expensive an the installation is not something your average console owner feels comfortable in installing, so the number of users that have the ability to play pirated games is small.

All you need to play Pirated games on a PC, is a system that meets the minimum requirements to play the game in the first place.
October 13, 2008 5:38:25 PM

Ascadia said:
Well lets see, just taking figures from a popular torrent site.

Xbox 360: 156 games available for download via Torrent
PS3: 9 games available for download via Torrent
PC: 5,078 games available to download via Torrent

While that is a lot, the PC section has 3-10 torrents per game title, where as the 360 only has 1 torrent per game.

However, a 360 game is downloaded 300-700 times per torrent.
A PC game between 2000-320,000 per torrent.

The completed downloads from a single Elder Scrolls: Oblivion torrent alone equals the total amount of times that all the 360 & PS3 games were downloaded together.

Now add up all the total downloads for Oblivion (All the torrents) and it almost doubles the total 360 & PS3 downloads.

Now times that by 5000 and you start to see why PC piracy is a significantly greater threat than console piracy.

I see 40 total completed downloads for Fallout 3, more copies of Fallout 3 will be stolen by Gamestop employees and teens with bad haircuts than have so far been torrented.

In order to use a downloaded game on a 360 or PS3, you have to mod the system, which involves buying and installing a mod chip which will forever void the warranty. When a system is first launched and for several years after, the mod chips are fairly expensive an the installation is not something your average console owner feels comfortable in installing, so the number of users that have the ability to play pirated games is small.

All you need to play Pirated games on a PC, is a system that meets the minimum requirements to play the game in the first place.


Not that I am saying you are totally incorrect, but I thought that I would correct a few things that you have said.

1) ISOHunt alone shows that around 800 people either have or will have fallout 3 for the 360 before it is even released. It will go up much more once the game actually hits the shelves.

2) You do not need a mod chip to mod your 360. A simple bios flash, which there are instructions on the internet 4 and take less tha half an hour is all you need to do.

Best,

3Ball
October 13, 2008 6:04:52 PM

I was using demonoid for my figures for the completed downloads, not ISOhunt.

I don't trust ISOHunts crapshoot of trackers, where as demonoid at least will show you the number of times a torrent has been completed, not just how many seeds or how many times the torrent file was downloaded from the site.

40, 400, 4000 it really doesnt matter, its still a long way off 320,000 downloads for a single torrent.

However, I didnt know it was that easy to mod a 360, I thought it was more like modding a Xbox or PS2, rather than flashing a PSP, thats kind of neat.

Still the number of people who are willing to take that risk are still small, I am always amazed that more people have not flashed their PSP's, however the majority of consumers are too afraid of spending several hundred dollars for a brick to try it.

The end message remains the same, console piracy is no where near as great a threat or as easily accessable as PC piracy.
October 13, 2008 6:40:13 PM

Ascadia said:
Well lets see, just taking figures from a popular torrent site.

Xbox 360: 156 games available for download via Torrent
PS3: 9 games available for download via Torrent
PC: 5,078 games available to download via Torrent

While that is a lot, the PC section has 3-10 torrents per game title, where as the 360 only has 1 torrent per game.

However, a 360 game is downloaded 300-700 times per torrent.
A PC game between 2000-320,000 per torrent.

The completed downloads from a single Elder Scrolls: Oblivion torrent alone equals the total amount of times that all the 360 & PS3 games were downloaded together.

Now add up all the total downloads for Oblivion (All the torrents) and it almost doubles the total 360 & PS3 downloads.

Now times that by 5000 and you start to see why PC piracy is a significantly greater threat than console piracy.

I see 40 total completed downloads for Fallout 3, more copies of Fallout 3 will be stolen by Gamestop employees and teens with bad haircuts than have so far been torrented.

In order to use a downloaded game on a 360 or PS3, you have to mod the system, which involves buying and installing a mod chip which will forever void the warranty. When a system is first launched and for several years after, the mod chips are fairly expensive an the installation is not something your average console owner feels comfortable in installing, so the number of users that have the ability to play pirated games is small.

All you need to play Pirated games on a PC, is a system that meets the minimum requirements to play the game in the first place.
Some people have hosted disc images on different torrents for PS3 games, however there is currently no way to play them. The firmware has yet to be cracked allowing piracy, and even when it is there will still be a lot more difficult than the 360 due to image size, blu-ray discs, and whatever other means of protection Sony has implemented.
October 13, 2008 6:51:43 PM

So really, the real looser in the fight against piracy, is microsoft?
October 14, 2008 2:47:43 AM

Ascadia, we must be looking at completely different figures here. First, you're looking at a public torrent site that is not anywhere near the size of some of the others. I also hope you know that there are many underground / locked registration torrent sites out there, one of which is where Fallout 3 leaked from. Additionally, you seem to be looking at seeds as some sort of completed statistic, but it's not at all. Seeds are only the people who are sticking around to share the files after they've finished downloading it. All a torrent needs is one seed, everyone else can pick up the slack to share what's been transferred out.

In terms of the number of seeds, I'd imagine that a lot of people would disconnect right away on a public torrent especially when downloading a high profile game like Fallout 3 in order to not get a complaint filed on them by Bethesda. I'd imagine that Bethesda is logging IPs of people who jump on these public torrents.

On the two public torrents I looked at just now, I saw well over 800 combined seeds total, and around 3000 peers across all Fallout 3 torrents. Also, the torrent site that exclusively leaked Fallout 3 has 100k members, and locked registration. I don't have access to the private sites, but I can imagine that Fallout 3 would be quite popular.

Going even further, you also have to account for things like ftp servers, newsgroups, IRC (the channel I ended up in during my research had 1200 users dedicated to console piracy), and black market transactions in the US and in other countries where physical discs are sold. If I had to make a guess at how many pirated copies of Fallout 3 have already been attained by people out there, I'd say somewhere around 65,000. By the time retail hits, I'd put that number at 125k easy worldwide, and then even more after it's on shelves.

I'm sure some of those pirates will buy it either way, and there are also those that would have never bought it. The grey area though of people who would have but were on the fence will probably lose a lot of desire to buy it at full retail price once they've beaten it a couple of times. I mean, this was an extremely early leak, spoilers are already out there, and most people who downloaded or bought a copy could probably beat it at least once before they could actually buy it on shelves.

With all that said, I think console piracy is pretty big, it has been for awhile, and will only keep growing as time goes on. Also, I don't think PC piracy is as simple as you're making it out to be. The average Joe might know how to download an MP3, but not how to jump through all the hoops that pirated pc games make people go through. Cracks, image utilities, anti-blacklist utilities, etc.

I've discussed this at length with EA in the past year as they've been the victim of several high profile pc and console leaks, and at times I've had to help them hunt the leaks down. It's my honest opinion that those very same PC pirates that developers currently love to hate are the ones who will follow the transition of games to the consoles. The only thing I can see working for consoles is disc based authentication, where the launcher would have to be pulled down the hard drive via a network connection and match the disc's print or serial number encoded during the manufacturing process. Then it would have to check in with a master server on each load, verifying the game. That'd be a tough nut to crack, but it'd also be very inconvenient for the legit customer.

Honestly, the war on pirates is like the war on drugs. I cannot see us reaching day in our lifetime where pirates have been eradicated, just like there will not be an eradication of pot smokers. Each instance involves a criminal act, but it's just not feasible to believe that the chunk of the general public that take part in those activities are just going to wake up one day and stop what they're doing. I mean, how many people have you known in your life that have made a copy of a tape, cd, vhs tape, dvd, or even downloaded a song at least once? What, six or seven out of ten? Now, how many do it actively? Pirates believe that piracy is a victimless crime, just like potheads do. Enough people out there engage in piracy where a very large chunk of the population would have to be punished, or pardoned for what they had done in the past.

Anyways, I can say that I take pride in my collection, and I'd never be happy with a bunch of burned discs or mp3s. I like having physical retail representations of music, games, movies, etc. that I enjoy, or at least thought I would. I have always loved having my game boxes and the manuals or other goodies they come with, and I have closets full of storage boxes and rubbermaid bins which contain all the games I've ever owned. A lot of other people simply don't care about that stuff though, they just want to save money, try before they buy, or simply just want to have the biggest collection of games, movies, or albums ever recorded in history.
October 14, 2008 3:02:19 AM

Yea, I can only imagine how popular this is on BC.

I'd believe that there are way more PC "games" being copied then console. I'm not sure how many are what you guys would call games. This figure probably also includes such gems as bigfish games, (a new "game" every DAY?) as well as cracked copies of BeJeweled, etc. In terms of real games, its probably more towards consoles. It has to be, they don't release games on PC anymore.

I think this is important to realize for the developers. They keep saying they can't release it on the PC, because it will just get pirated. Well, guess what? The same is as true in the console world as it is for PC.

Quote:
and there are also those that would have never bought it. The grey area though of people who would have but were on the fence will probably lose a lot of desire to buy it at full retail price once they've beaten it a couple of times.


So is piracy the result of bad games being released? If games had good replay value, or an online multiplier worth playing, you might see more sales of games. Look at TF2. Online ONLY. Yet its a great games. As much as some people hate it, the steam model might be the best thing for PC. Trust me, as long as you buy the game, there are few issues. (and I'll be buying TF games until I die!)
October 14, 2008 3:28:04 AM

I think multiplayer is a huge early incentive for people to purchase a game. Single player only takes you so far, multiplayer usually provides the most potential to extend longevity. The fact is, cd-key authorization systems work as long as they're managed. I personally had to deal with pirates that were trying to get online with pirated copies of Command and Conquer 3, and they just couldn't get past the key check to jump online. No key, no multiplayer.

I'll put it this way, if a pirate knows that there's a community out there enjoying a solid multiplayer experience, they're going to be much more likely to spend their money. You love Team Fortress 2 you said, so put yourself in a pirate's shoes. Let's say TF2 had a small single player campaign and the robust multiplayer modes that you love. If you had downloaded it, and kept hearing all these great things about multiplayer, you'd be much more likely to fork out the cash even if you avoid buying games at all costs. This would especially be true if you had a small taste of it prior via bot matches or a multiplayer beta test.
October 14, 2008 5:03:22 AM

@ryanlord

No, I am not confusing number of Seeds, with total downloads.

Many "registration required" torrent sites, provide the confirmed number of times a torrent has been completed by its members. You do not need to be registered with the site in order to view this information as it is used as a form of promotion for the site in that "Look at all our member who have already completed the download, you could be one too!" type of way.

I am surprised that someone of your influence in the war on Piracy would not be privy to such basic information, such as torrent sites keeping statistics on their users.
October 14, 2008 7:59:59 AM

Ascadia said:
@ryanlord

No, I am not confusing number of Seeds, with total downloads.

Many "registration required" torrent sites, provide the confirmed number of times a torrent has been completed by its members. You do not need to be registered with the site in order to view this information as it is used as a form of promotion for the site in that "Look at all our member who have already completed the download, you could be one too!" type of way.

I am surprised that someone of your influence in the war on Piracy would not be privy to such basic information, such as torrent sites keeping statistics on their users.


Maybe console games are now on everyones torrent hit list because there are not many pc releases and people are sick of waiting for the better gaming experience on the pc...

I personally couldnt give a monkeys uncle for the Xbox version let alone the PS3 version...

Im gonna buy the PC version as this is where this title should stay..

Just hope its not another shat port over from console to pc which seems to have happend to some titles of late...

We as pc users must fight for bringing out machine to the forefront again...


Maybe pc people should buy some hardware this year and make a stand to game companies on which machine is best..



October 14, 2008 1:37:07 PM

Ascadia - I realize that some sites keep statistics such as total number of downloads, GB transferred up / down, ratio, seed duration, etc. but you were referencing a very low end and quirky public site like Demonoid and basing your research off of that. You even implied that there were going to be more employees of Gamestop who'd steal physical copies than people who downloaded Fallout 3. That is extremely inaccurate.
October 14, 2008 2:28:17 PM

I take it you have never worked at a Gamestop?
October 14, 2008 2:30:55 PM

They offered me a manager position about eight years ago but I did not take it at the time due to a better offer elsewhere. So, no. :) 

Even if you suggest that managers or a store employees typically smuggle discs home, it's still not going to compare to the number of downloads.
October 14, 2008 9:08:52 PM

remember with torrents, target file downloads don't count 100% completed games

when I had my friend make one of his hard drives into a iso file, then send it to me via bit torrent , it said the file was downloaded over 40 times (over 30GB downloaded over 40 times within 2 weeks on a private password protected tracker, when hell freezes over )

target file downloads are counted when ever the user reconnects to finish the download or when ever they recheck the file and reconnect.

I dual boot 4 copies of windows and my torrent list is shared between all 4 (while all 4 partitions are hidden from each other via partition magic, i have a main partition thats visible to all and that holds all files that are not installed (music and many other files)

when ever I boot into another os, the torrent client reconnects to the tracker, and it rechecks the file and verifies everything and it counts as a target file download

torrent files have poor tracking abilities, they cant tell if each target file download was the entire download or not, they count when ever a user connects and starts downloading, even if they just download 1KB

look at torrent sites that have torrents that has everyone complaining that there stuck on 80% (funny to watch)

depending on the site you may see something like 4000 target file downloads but no one ever finished

also 99.99999% of all games on torrent sites are fake

game developers said that oh this many people pirated the game with out checking if the files are real or not

October 14, 2008 10:29:44 PM

i downloaded the torrent but when i unzipped the rar file it said parishiltonhawtsex.avi.exe. and when i tried to open it,my computer shut off and wont turn back on... what gives?
October 15, 2008 12:18:58 AM

itadakimasu said:
i downloaded the torrent but when i unzipped the rar file it said parishiltonhawtsex.avi.exe. and when i tried to open it,my computer shut off and wont turn back on... what gives?


I dunno. Maybe you should pay for games instead of pirating them. Probably safer for your computer. Just a thought....
October 15, 2008 9:09:04 AM

You know what I don’t like about games like this, every time there is a good 360 game released I end up buying it and playing it to death and roughly about 3 to 4 days later my 360 ends up becoming an overprice paperweight that I have to RMA again. Apparently according to Microsoft tech support if my 360 blows one more time I will get a brand new one instead of a refurb unit :D 

So between Fable 2 and Fallout 3 I should be looking at a new console baby!!!

Just to clear things up as well, console pirating has not been anything new to this generation. It’s actually been huge for about 2 years now, I know as I work for a company that distributions blank DVD’s and double layer DVD’s (the disc the 360 needs to run) have been selling by the million-plus per month for the last 18 months I would say.

You need only look on torrent sites and see on simultaneous platform released games that 360 downloads always outweigh the PC downloads by a factor of almost 200%, and that was an observation from Bioshock when it was first released god knows how many months ago.

Now this brings me to the Play Station 3, could it be fact that one of the reasons for the lack of console sales compared to the Xbox 360 are for the main part because of two reasons? One of those reasons might be because the Play Station 3 is unhackable and there for of no appeal to anyone that wants to pirate games. Also could the 360 sales not also be bolstered for the same reason I keep having to return my console?

You think about it, to a pirate that’s saving thousands by not having to pay a penny buying the games is it not prudent for him to just simply buy another £125 360 once the one he has breaks? For the reason that once it is flashed you will not be able to attain an RMA on your unit. Now think of the fact that potentially there is millions of people out there with hacked consoles and on average they will have one break in 2 years does this not mean that 360 sales could indeed be boosted by millions of consoles per year?

So how can we trust console sales figures from Microsoft, they could potentially be out by tens of millions.
October 15, 2008 9:40:34 PM

wow.... thats all i can say is .. wow......
September 23, 2009 5:40:02 AM

This topic has been closed by Mousemonkey
!