Please explain accounts in XP

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Someone once tried to explain to me how many accounts get set up with a
fresh install, but considering it's only me who uses the PC do I need all
these accounts (admin etc) can I just not set pc up with me and no need for
password so I just go into desktop, I know some people will say it's not
safe but it's my home PC so nobody else uses it.
7 answers Last reply
More about please explain accounts
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Jim wrote:
    > Someone once tried to explain to me how many accounts get set up with
    > a fresh install, but considering it's only me who uses the PC do I
    > need all these accounts (admin etc) can I just not set pc up with me
    > and no need for password so I just go into desktop, I know some
    > people will say it's not safe but it's my home PC so nobody else uses
    > it.

    Hi, Jim;

    Check out http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=282866 for how to remove your
    password and enable XP to log you in automatically.

    As for the other accounts, I'm guessing you mean the ~4 others listed in the
    Computer Management, Local Users screen. Probably best to leave those as
    they are (be sure to leave Guest disabled).

    --

    ....Sky

    ======
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    You need at least two accounts, three might be better.

    The installation will always make THE ADMINISTRATOR account.
    You should make a working account that will have
    administrator privileges. When you make this account the
    ADMINISTRATOR ACCOUNT will be hidden.
    You should also make an account to use for routine
    operations that has limited function.

    You can set the computer to logon and you don't need to have
    a password for a limited account but administrator accounts
    certainly should have a password. Remember the password.

    The reason for this are simple. The ADMINISTRATOR account
    is your emergency tool, you don't use it or install a lot of
    junk to it. If the computer won't boot to the account you
    usually use, you can often boot the ADMIN account and fix
    the problem.
    You may want or need an account with admin priv. because
    some tasks may require the power of an administrator, such
    as updates, virus scans or creating a connection. This
    account will be used and may become corrupt which is why you
    keep a "clean" Adin acct.
    Many experts suggest that you do as much work on the
    computer using a limited user account because that prevents
    many unwanted things from happening. If you are hacked or
    infected in a limited account, you only have to worry about
    the damage that can be done by a limited user (so they say).


    --
    The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
    But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.


    "Jim" <luckyjim2000_2000(unowhat2remove)@yahoo.com> wrote in
    message news:41b86040$0$1069$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    | Someone once tried to explain to me how many accounts get
    set up with a
    | fresh install, but considering it's only me who uses the
    PC do I need all
    | these accounts (admin etc) can I just not set pc up with
    me and no need for
    | password so I just go into desktop, I know some people
    will say it's not
    | safe but it's my home PC so nobody else uses it.
    |
    |
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Good question.

    Windows XP is used in many different settings, so it needs to accomodate as
    many of them as possible. XP was setup with user accounts so that, for
    example, different family members could each use the computer with their own
    settings, and businesses could manage computers on their networks. You can
    ignore the various user accounts - they do not affect your computer's speed
    or performance in any way and will not cause errors.

    For example, the so-called Default User is not really a user account, but a
    collection of the default settings that will be present for all users. This
    gives all users a functional operating system right out of the box, without
    the need to spend hours configuring the computer.

    The All Users account is also not really a user account, but a collection of
    Start menu and desktop selections that will appear on every user's desktop.
    This makes it easy to include the same Start menu and desktop icons on every
    user's computer.

    The Administrator account has unrestricted access to the operating system.
    This is needed if, for example, you want to install software, defragment
    your computer, or perform other system level operations. You should not be
    using an Administrator account for your day-to-day computing. If a virus or
    spyware infects your Administrator account, it too will have unrestricted
    access to your computer. You don't want that. For everyday computing, you
    want to use an account that has restricted access to the computer.

    So you see, the account structure of XP is designed to make the computer
    more convenient and safer. You don't have to pay attention to any account
    other than your own.
    --
    Ted Zieglar


    "Jim" <luckyjim2000_2000(unowhat2remove)@yahoo.com> wrote in message
    news:41b86040$0$1069$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    > Someone once tried to explain to me how many accounts get set up with a
    > fresh install, but considering it's only me who uses the PC do I need all
    > these accounts (admin etc) can I just not set pc up with me and no need
    for
    > password so I just go into desktop, I know some people will say it's not
    > safe but it's my home PC so nobody else uses it.
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Jim Macklin" <p51mustang[threeX12]@xxxhotmail.calm> wrote in message
    news:u34$P$f3EHA.2572@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > You need at least two accounts, three might be better.
    >
    Jesus 3, I'm having trouble getting my head round 2 (user: that's me, and
    Admin) let alone 3.


    > The installation will always make THE ADMINISTRATOR account.
    > You should make a working account that will have
    > administrator privileges. When you make this account the
    > ADMINISTRATOR ACCOUNT will be hidden.
    > You should also make an account to use for routine
    > operations that has limited function.
    >
    > You can set the computer to logon and you don't need to have
    > a password for a limited account but administrator accounts
    > certainly should have a password. Remember the password.
    >
    > The reason for this are simple. The ADMINISTRATOR account
    > is your emergency tool, you don't use it or install a lot of
    > junk to it. If the computer won't boot to the account you
    > usually use, you can often boot the ADMIN account and fix
    > the problem.
    > You may want or need an account with admin priv. because
    > some tasks may require the power of an administrator, such
    > as updates, virus scans or creating a connection. This
    > account will be used and may become corrupt which is why you
    > keep a "clean" Adin acct.
    > Many experts suggest that you do as much work on the
    > computer using a limited user account because that prevents
    > many unwanted things from happening. If you are hacked or
    > infected in a limited account, you only have to worry about
    > the damage that can be done by a limited user (so they say).
    >
    >
    Mmmm food for thought, now you have put things that way i guess i can see a
    point to admin account (god i hate being wrong) but if i set up machine with
    just admin (set up on it's own as you say) and my user account, will my user
    account be able to do everything i need, for example instal new software
    remove and mod things as i wish, so in effect just keeping Admin account for
    if pc dies on me i can try to get in using admin.
    Have i got it right or am i still missing the point?
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    In XP, each user account is independent. If you have a
    three home businesses, five children, a wife and want
    security, you get XP Pro and use NTFS. Then each user's
    files are private from the others. The IRS would like that
    since each business files are not co-mingled with the
    others. You children's email and chat (and homework) are
    separate and one child can't delete the others.
    Of course, in a good world, you would spend a few hundred
    dollars to buy everyone their own PC. But your three
    businesses would still be sharing with your personal stuff.


    --
    The people think the Constitution protects their rights;
    But government sees it as an obstacle to be overcome.


    "Jim" <luckyjim2000_2000(unowhat2remove)@yahoo.com> wrote in
    message news:41b89886$0$1059$db0fefd9@news.zen.co.uk...
    |
    | "Jim Macklin" <p51mustang[threeX12]@xxxhotmail.calm> wrote
    in message
    | news:u34$P$f3EHA.2572@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    | > You need at least two accounts, three might be better.
    | >
    | Jesus 3, I'm having trouble getting my head round 2 (user:
    that's me, and
    | Admin) let alone 3.
    |
    |
    | > The installation will always make THE ADMINISTRATOR
    account.
    | > You should make a working account that will have
    | > administrator privileges. When you make this account
    the
    | > ADMINISTRATOR ACCOUNT will be hidden.
    | > You should also make an account to use for routine
    | > operations that has limited function.
    | >
    | > You can set the computer to logon and you don't need to
    have
    | > a password for a limited account but administrator
    accounts
    | > certainly should have a password. Remember the
    password.
    | >
    | > The reason for this are simple. The ADMINISTRATOR
    account
    | > is your emergency tool, you don't use it or install a
    lot of
    | > junk to it. If the computer won't boot to the account
    you
    | > usually use, you can often boot the ADMIN account and
    fix
    | > the problem.
    | > You may want or need an account with admin priv. because
    | > some tasks may require the power of an administrator,
    such
    | > as updates, virus scans or creating a connection. This
    | > account will be used and may become corrupt which is why
    you
    | > keep a "clean" Adin acct.
    | > Many experts suggest that you do as much work on the
    | > computer using a limited user account because that
    prevents
    | > many unwanted things from happening. If you are hacked
    or
    | > infected in a limited account, you only have to worry
    about
    | > the damage that can be done by a limited user (so they
    say).
    | >
    | >
    | Mmmm food for thought, now you have put things that way i
    guess i can see a
    | point to admin account (god i hate being wrong) but if i
    set up machine with
    | just admin (set up on it's own as you say) and my user
    account, will my user
    | account be able to do everything i need, for example
    instal new software
    | remove and mod things as i wish, so in effect just keeping
    Admin account for
    | if pc dies on me i can try to get in using admin.
    | Have i got it right or am i still missing the point?
    |
    |
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Thanks, Ted,

    That makes a lot of sense, and helps me. However, I have apps which appear
    on my Admin desktop, and on the taskbar when logged in as Admin, which are
    not there when logged in as "User", even tho I did not intentionally install
    differently. Is there a good online refrence to explain this?

    TIA,
    Craig

    "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    news:uPSSNEg3EHA.2316@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > Good question.
    >
    > Windows XP is used in many different settings, so it needs to accomodate
    > as
    > many of them as possible. XP was setup with user accounts so that, for
    > example, different family members could each use the computer with their
    > own
    > settings, and businesses could manage computers on their networks. You can
    > ignore the various user accounts - they do not affect your computer's
    > speed
    > or performance in any way and will not cause errors.
    >
    > For example, the so-called Default User is not really a user account, but
    > a
    > collection of the default settings that will be present for all users.
    > This
    > gives all users a functional operating system right out of the box,
    > without
    > the need to spend hours configuring the computer.
    >
    > The All Users account is also not really a user account, but a collection
    > of
    > Start menu and desktop selections that will appear on every user's
    > desktop.
    > This makes it easy to include the same Start menu and desktop icons on
    > every
    > user's computer.
    >
    > The Administrator account has unrestricted access to the operating system.
    > This is needed if, for example, you want to install software, defragment
    > your computer, or perform other system level operations. You should not be
    > using an Administrator account for your day-to-day computing. If a virus
    > or
    > spyware infects your Administrator account, it too will have unrestricted
    > access to your computer. You don't want that. For everyday computing, you
    > want to use an account that has restricted access to the computer.
    >
    > So you see, the account structure of XP is designed to make the computer
    > more convenient and safer. You don't have to pay attention to any account
    > other than your own.
    > --
    > Ted Zieglar
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Well, that's where it gets interesting.

    Some programs install themselves only to the administrator account, and some
    install to all user accounts. Some programs give you the choice.

    Each user has a section of the registry just for them. 'Installing to an
    account' means that the program installs itself into that user's portion of
    the registry.

    I'm sure there are plenty of good references to the whole thing on the
    Internet, particularly at Microsoft's web site, but I haven't looked for one
    myself.

    Ted Zieglar

    "Craig" <craig6731@hotmail.com> wrote in message
    news:7L6dnV2YDqTQ9ybcRVn-1w@rogers.com...
    > Thanks, Ted,
    >
    > That makes a lot of sense, and helps me. However, I have apps which appear
    > on my Admin desktop, and on the taskbar when logged in as Admin, which are
    > not there when logged in as "User", even tho I did not intentionally
    > install differently. Is there a good online refrence to explain this?
    >
    > TIA,
    > Craig
    >
    > "Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:uPSSNEg3EHA.2316@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >> Good question.
    >>
    >> Windows XP is used in many different settings, so it needs to accomodate
    >> as
    >> many of them as possible. XP was setup with user accounts so that, for
    >> example, different family members could each use the computer with their
    >> own
    >> settings, and businesses could manage computers on their networks. You
    >> can
    >> ignore the various user accounts - they do not affect your computer's
    >> speed
    >> or performance in any way and will not cause errors.
    >>
    >> For example, the so-called Default User is not really a user account, but
    >> a
    >> collection of the default settings that will be present for all users.
    >> This
    >> gives all users a functional operating system right out of the box,
    >> without
    >> the need to spend hours configuring the computer.
    >>
    >> The All Users account is also not really a user account, but a collection
    >> of
    >> Start menu and desktop selections that will appear on every user's
    >> desktop.
    >> This makes it easy to include the same Start menu and desktop icons on
    >> every
    >> user's computer.
    >>
    >> The Administrator account has unrestricted access to the operating
    >> system.
    >> This is needed if, for example, you want to install software, defragment
    >> your computer, or perform other system level operations. You should not
    >> be
    >> using an Administrator account for your day-to-day computing. If a virus
    >> or
    >> spyware infects your Administrator account, it too will have unrestricted
    >> access to your computer. You don't want that. For everyday computing, you
    >> want to use an account that has restricted access to the computer.
    >>
    >> So you see, the account structure of XP is designed to make the computer
    >> more convenient and safer. You don't have to pay attention to any account
    >> other than your own.
    >> --
    >> Ted Zieglar
    >>
    >
    >
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