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Tri-mode vs. Digital question

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Anonymous
June 10, 2004 7:35:20 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I have a Moto v60 phone from Verizon and my husband has one from At&t.
His phone shows no service at my sister's house (who lives in the
country, outside of Austin) Her Cingular has no service at her house
either. She has GSM and C/TDMA - (whichever one it is). I am not
sure what my husband has (if it is tri-mode or not). I can use my
phone at her house (if I stand by a window). I assume my phone is
tri-mode. I had an option to turn analog on only, so I did and it
showed no service. I put it back to regular digital mode and it
worked. What I am needing to know is, because of this (switching to
analog and all) do I need a tri-mode phone or can all digital work? I
will be getting a new phone soon and there is not much to choose from
in tri-mode. I am bringing my husband over from At&t so we need a new
phone.
Thanks for any help!
cj
June 10, 2004 8:37:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I would guess that you have a V60 with tri-mode CDMA/analog
features, and that your husband probably has a tri-mode
TDMA phone. From what you say, there must be no analog
or TDMA/GSM in your sister's area. I would also suspect
that you are connecting to Verizon's CDMA. Generally,
there are two bands of service in the U.S. One is on 800
Megahertz, the other is on 1900 Megahertz. If a phone has
analog and digital on 800 Mhz then it is a dual-mode. If
it has analog and digital on 800 Mhz and Digital on 1900
Mhz then it is called a tri-mode phone. Usually though if
Verizon has coverage on 800 Mhz in an area VZW also
has analog on 800 Mhz. There is no analog on 1900 Mhz.
If it were me, my phone, my money and need to communicate
reliably I would go with a tri-mode Verizon phone such as
you probably have. The model of V60 which you have and
the area you are located in would assist in helping. You could
call *611 at Verizon and get pretty good info. Good luck
Anonymous
June 11, 2004 1:17:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

The Motorola v60 series phones are trimode.

Trimode phones come in two flavors (depending on your carrier):
1. CDMA800MHz, CDMA1900MHz, Analog800MHz (Motorola v60c)
2. TDMA800MHZ, TDMA1900MHz. Analog800MHz (Motorola v60t)

The Verizon v60 is the v60c (CDMA800&1900,Analog800). The AT&T v60 is the
v60t (TDMA800&1900, Analog800MHz). The only thing they have in common is
they look alike, similar menu, and both have analog800MHz. Modulation wise
they are not the same phone nor are they compatible with the same digital
networks..

Cingular's big push now is providing its new customers with (GSM only)
"world phones" (GSM 800,1800,1900MHz capable phones).

I don't think Cingular or AT&T have any analog towers now, or if so they are
very few and very far in between.

I have never heard of a trimode GSM phone (GSM850MHz,GSM1900,Analog800MHz).

GSM phones only support digital modes for some reason. In rural areas,
currently in the USA (away from interstates and sizable towns) (GSM only)
phones are worthless. Maybe in a few more years GSM coverage will be as
extensive as CDMA is now, but remains to be seen. For now it would be a
good idea for people with GSM only cellphones to bring their trimode phones
along with them as backup (on their remote or cross country road trips and
vacations).

You can get phones from Cingular that support TDMA and GSM modes (which are
referred to as GAIT phones), but I don't think the GAIT phones have analog
capability either.

My brother-in-law just got a new cellphone with Cingular. He's got the
Motorola v400GSM flip phone (world phone) with camera. Its a really nice
phone, until you ride out into the country, then it becomes just a
"glimmering paper weight".

Cingular wants to switch over all their TDMA towers to GSM, but this process
will take several more years. Before this process is complete, people using
trimode phones (TDMA) will have to replace them with GSM phones.

If Cingular were really smart they would have Motorola make them a GSM/CDMA
phone until Cingular completes their plan of AT&T acquisition and switch to
a totally GSM network.

I would swtich to Cingular myself if they were to develope a GSM/CDMA
phone/plan like that. A GSM/CDMA phone would always have coverage!
Seems like a corporation as big as Cingular could easily cut a deal with
Verizon/Alltel to provide a "back-up roaming network".

Oh well, who at Cingular/Verizon/Alltel/AT&T/etc. really cares about what
the customer really wants? Hint: COVERAGE!

JoshIII
upstate south carolina
Related resources
June 11, 2004 1:17:30 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Excellent-- Looking at VZW maps, VZW shows
extensive "digital" coverage around Austin, but
no Analog. ATTWS shows GSM, but no analog.
Regards
Anonymous
June 11, 2004 2:10:29 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"Gator" <gator2@webmail.co.za> wrote in message
news:2is9m9Fqp6v2U1@uni-berlin.de
> I would guess that you have a V60 with tri-mode CDMA/analog
> features, and that your husband probably has a tri-mode
> TDMA phone. From what you say, there must be no analog
> or TDMA/GSM in your sister's area. I would also suspect
> that you are connecting to Verizon's CDMA. Generally,
> there are two bands of service in the U.S. One is on 800
> Megahertz, the other is on 1900 Megahertz. If a phone has
> analog and digital on 800 Mhz then it is a dual-mode. If
> it has analog and digital on 800 Mhz and Digital on 1900
> MHz then it is called a tri-mode phone. Usually though if
> Verizon has coverage on 800 MHz in an area VOW also
> has analog on 800 MHz. There is no analog on 1900 MHz.
> If it were me, my phone, my money and need to communicate
> reliably I would go with a tri-mode Verizon phone such as
> you probably have. The model of V60 which you have and
> the area you are located in would assist in helping. You could
> call *611 at Verizon and get pretty good info. Good luck

That makes no sense to me whatsoever. The original statement was "I had an
option to turn analog on only, so I did and it
showed no service. I put it back to regular digital mode and it worked.".
Why on earth would the OP need analog at all? Seems like a dual digital is
fine and works. You even say in your post ,"From what you say, there must be
no analog or TDMA/GSM in your sister's area", so why in the world would your
final statement be "If it were me, my phone, my money and need to
communicate
reliably I would go with a tri-mode Verizon phone such as you probably
have". Seems to me that both the OP's statements and your own say that
digital works there, so why suggest analog?
June 11, 2004 8:52:34 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

> I don't think Cingular or AT&T have any analog towers now, or if so they
are
> very few and very far in between.
>
I'm sure that AT&T still has its legacy analog towers in the northeast (at
least New York City area) that will transition to Cingular when the sale
closes.
Anonymous
June 11, 2004 11:00:54 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

In article <mUayc.24924$wH4.1239840@twister.southeast.rr.com>,
Stan <stanncno1spam@noispam.yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> I don't think Cingular or AT&T have any analog towers now, or if so they
>are
>> very few and very far in between.
>>
>I'm sure that AT&T still has its legacy analog towers in the northeast (at
>least New York City area) that will transition to Cingular when the sale
>closes.

For a few more years at least, there MUST (by FCC regulation) be analog
service provided on the cellular (850MHz) bands, regardless of any
digital service also there (TDMA/GSM/CDMA). Analog is not required
(and indeed, is not available) on the PCS bands. Which means that the
cellular providers moving from TDMA to GSM have to partition their
band between analog/TDMA/GSM. Which is why they are going after PCS
allocations. (Nextel is not in the cellular band and thus does not have
to provide analog.)
June 12, 2004 3:55:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

There are places out here in the Southwest, especially in the mountainous
area, where a pure digital phone isn't worth the cost of a free drink. We
have to use the analog because we are in the fringe areas.

> Why on earth would the OP need analog at all? Seems like a dual digital is
> fine and works. You even say in your post ,"From what you say, there must
be
> no analog or TDMA/GSM in your sister's area", so why in the world would
your
> final statement be "If it were me, my phone, my money and need to
> communicate
> reliably I would go with a tri-mode Verizon phone such as you probably
> have". Seems to me that both the OP's statements and your own say that
> digital works there, so why suggest analog?
>
>
Anonymous
June 12, 2004 4:30:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I understand that there are some places with analog only, heck I was in
Alaska (almost all Analog), and am now in Nevada (outside of big cities,
almost all analog, ...warming up from Alaska :)  I do however have most of my
family on the east coast (DC/Baltimore/New York/Tampa... all digital areas),
and the OP works and lives in an all digital area, and never uses analog, so
why suggest a tri-mode?

Isn't that akin to much of the rest of the world using GSM phones, so you
are better off getting one here just in case you travel to another country?




"Ed" <kc7mwp@()cybertrails.com> wrote in message
news:efydnbpG-YWcNFfdRVn-tw@sedona.net
> There are places out here in the Southwest, especially in the
> mountainous area, where a pure digital phone isn't worth the cost of
> a free drink. We have to use the analog because we are in the fringe
> areas.
>
>> Why on earth would the OP need analog at all? Seems like a dual
>> digital is fine and works. You even say in your post ,"From what you
>> say, there must be no analog or TDMA/GSM in your sister's area", so
>> why in the world would your final statement be "If it were me, my
>> phone, my money and need to communicate
>> reliably I would go with a tri-mode Verizon phone such as you
>> probably have". Seems to me that both the OP's statements and your
>> own say that digital works there, so why suggest analog?
Anonymous
June 13, 2004 3:01:07 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

In article <efydnbpG-YWcNFfdRVn-tw@sedona.net>,
Ed <kc7mwp@()cybertrails.com> wrote:
>There are places out here in the Southwest, especially in the mountainous
>area, where a pure digital phone isn't worth the cost of a free drink. We
>have to use the analog because we are in the fringe areas.

If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice, note
all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink being
part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK... technically,
the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but most of them
are analog.)
June 13, 2004 3:01:08 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On 12 Jun 2004 23:01:07 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:

>In article <efydnbpG-YWcNFfdRVn-tw@sedona.net>,
>Ed <kc7mwp@()cybertrails.com> wrote:
>>There are places out here in the Southwest, especially in the mountainous
>>area, where a pure digital phone isn't worth the cost of a free drink. We
>>have to use the analog because we are in the fringe areas.
>
>If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice, note
>all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink being
>part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK... technically,
>the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but most of them
>are analog.)

Tri-mode is a misnomer. All phones sold by Verizon are either single
or dual mode i.e. digital and analog or digital only. The only way it
would be tri-mode is if it was analog and two different digital
technologies. A tri-mode phone might be something like a GAIT phone
which can do analog, TDMA (IS-136) and GSM.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
Anonymous
June 13, 2004 3:01:09 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

The way they define "mode" is a technology plus a frequency band.

i.e.

Analog 800mhz
CDMA 800mhz
CDMA 1900mhz

-Eric

"Joseph" <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.NONOcom> wrote in message
news:5b8nc0tkg5rru41di58tubhnf0knuemi92@4ax.com...
> On 12 Jun 2004 23:01:07 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
>
> >In article <efydnbpG-YWcNFfdRVn-tw@sedona.net>,
> >Ed <kc7mwp@()cybertrails.com> wrote:
> >>There are places out here in the Southwest, especially in the
mountainous
> >>area, where a pure digital phone isn't worth the cost of a free drink.
We
> >>have to use the analog because we are in the fringe areas.
> >
> >If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice, note
> >all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink being
> >part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK... technically,
> >the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but most of them
> >are analog.)
>
> Tri-mode is a misnomer. All phones sold by Verizon are either single
> or dual mode i.e. digital and analog or digital only. The only way it
> would be tri-mode is if it was analog and two different digital
> technologies. A tri-mode phone might be something like a GAIT phone
> which can do analog, TDMA (IS-136) and GSM.
>
> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
> remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
Anonymous
June 13, 2004 3:05:00 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

I had heard that it was Analog, digital, and PCS. (Of course I also heard
PCS was an acronym for Pretty Clear Sound). Both of those pearls (not) of
wisdom were on company documents when I worked for sprint. (They lied about
everything else, wouldn't surprise me to find out they lied about this
also).




"Eric Rosenberry" <erics@R3MOVErosenberry.org> wrote in message
news:sbudnWpQu8S5RFbd4p2dnA@comcast.com
> The way they define "mode" is a technology plus a frequency band.
>
> i.e.
>
> Analog 800mhz
> CDMA 800mhz
> CDMA 1900mhz
>
> -Eric
>
> "Joseph" <JoeOfSeattle@yahoo.NONOcom> wrote in message
> news:5b8nc0tkg5rru41di58tubhnf0knuemi92@4ax.com...
>> On 12 Jun 2004 23:01:07 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
>>
>>> In article <efydnbpG-YWcNFfdRVn-tw@sedona.net>,
>>> Ed <kc7mwp@()cybertrails.com> wrote:
>>>> There are places out here in the Southwest, especially in the
>>>> mountainous area, where a pure digital phone isn't worth the cost
>>>> of a free drink. We have to use the analog because we are in the
>>>> fringe areas.
>>>
>>> If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice,
>>> note all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink
>>> being part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK...
>>> technically, the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but
>>> most of them
>>> are analog.)
>>
>> Tri-mode is a misnomer. All phones sold by Verizon are either single
>> or dual mode i.e. digital and analog or digital only. The only way
>> it would be tri-mode is if it was analog and two different digital
>> technologies. A tri-mode phone might be something like a GAIT phone
>> which can do analog, TDMA (IS-136) and GSM.
>>
>> - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
>> remove NONO from .NONOcom to reply
Anonymous
June 13, 2004 3:41:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"Peter Pan" <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:2j294gFsfvg2U1@uni-berlin.de...
> I had heard that it was Analog, digital, and PCS. (Of course I also heard
> PCS was an acronym for Pretty Clear Sound). Both of those pearls (not) of
> wisdom were on company documents when I worked for sprint. (They lied
about
> everything else, wouldn't surprise me to find out they lied about this
> also).

CDMA is a digital technology.

PCS stands for "Personal Communication System" I believe (please correct me
if I am wrong). It is just the name for the spectrum in the 1900mhz
frequency that the FCC allocated.

-Eric
Anonymous
June 13, 2004 6:36:50 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

Eric Rosenberry <erics@r3moverosenberry.org> wrote:
>> wisdom were on company documents when I worked for sprint. (They lied
> about
>> everything else, wouldn't surprise me to find out they lied about this
>> also).
>
> CDMA is a digital technology.
>
> PCS stands for "Personal Communication System" I believe (please correct me
> if I am wrong). It is just the name for the spectrum in the 1900mhz
> frequency that the FCC allocated.

Correct. AT&T Wireless used to advertise its 1900 MHz TDMA as Digital PCS,
and of course 1900 MHz CDMA has always been advertised by Sprint as PCS.
Technically, the GSM carriers use "PCS" too since they run at both 850 and
1900 MHz (the 1900 MHz being the "PCS" band).

--
JustThe.net Internet & New Media Services, http://JustThe.net/
Steven J. Sobol, Geek In Charge / 888.480.4NET (4638) / sjsobol@JustThe.net
PGP Key available from your friendly local key server (0xE3AE35ED)
Apple Valley, California Nothing scares me anymore. I have three kids.
Anonymous
June 13, 2004 10:26:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On Fri, 11 Jun 2004 23:55:01 -0700, Ed wrote:

> There are places out here in the Southwest, especially in the mountainous
> area, where a pure digital phone isn't worth the cost of a free drink.

Same for parts of West Virginia, Northern PA, and many other states.
Anonymous
June 14, 2004 10:00:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

In article <Q6ednVh5pcMm1lDdRVn-gw@comcast.com>,
Eric Rosenberry <erics@R3MOVErosenberry.org> wrote:
>From my understanding of the Verizon Wireless maps, the Enhanced Services
>Map indicates Verizon native coverage, and on the America's Choice Map the
>red is digital coverage (either native or Extended Network) and the pink is
>analog Extended Network.
>
>-Eric
>
>"Andy Yee" <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote in message
>news:Xns95078E88A51ACayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88...
>> I thought the pink areas are the extended digital network.
>>
>> hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote in
>> news:cag1vj02rbu@news2.newsguy.com:
>> >
>> > If you look at the coverage map on the VZW site for America Choice, note
>> > all areas which are light pink or grey. These are analog. Pink being
>> > part of the extended network, grey not ($0.69/min). (OK... technically,
>> > the grey areas just indicate non-extended-network, but most of them
>> > are analog.)

On the America's Choice Coverage map (NOT the Enhanced Services/IN-Network
map!), the first caption has a red box and is labelled: "America's Choice
All-Digital Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area". The next line has a pink
and red box, and is labelled: "America's Choice Home Airtime Rate and
Coverage Area". The beige is labelled "Roaming Rate and Coverage Area".
Since the difference between the red caption and the red+pink caption is
the phrase "All-Digital", one can conclude that the pink on this map is
"America's Choice Non-Digital Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area".

THIS map does not distinguish native VZW and extended-network coverage.
Quoting from the "IMPORTANT MAP INFORMATION" on this page: "The America's
Choice map includes networks operated by other carriers".

The IN-network map does distinguish VZW and extended network.
Anonymous
June 15, 2004 1:09:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
>According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means digital,
>but probably not native coverage...

??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
(Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red labelled
as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but without the
"all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??
Anonymous
June 15, 2004 4:46:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:

>In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
>Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
>>According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means digital,
>>but probably not native coverage...
>
>??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
>(Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red labelled
>as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but without the
>"all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??

Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
haven't seen every map.
Anonymous
June 15, 2004 5:43:06 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

In article <3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com>,
Teddeli <nospam@nospam.com> wrote:
>On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
>
>>In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
>>Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
>>>According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means digital,
>>>but probably not native coverage...
>>
>>??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
>>(Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red labelled
>>as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but without the
>>"all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??
>
>Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
>Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
>Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
>haven't seen every map.

OK... the map I am looking at is:

<http://www.verizonwireless.com/images_b2c/maps/national...;

I used zip 95014 to get to the page containing this map.

The caption with only a red box says:

America's Choice All-Digital Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area

The caption with red and pink boxes says:

America's Choice Home Airtime Rate and Coverage Area

Where am I going wrong in interpreting pink as analog on this map?

No mention of native vs. extended.
Anonymous
June 15, 2004 5:53:17 AM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
>
>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
>>
>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??
>
> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
> haven't seen every map.

The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
depending on the provider.

If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.
Anonymous
June 15, 2004 10:08:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.cellular.verizon (More info?)

In article <2j7rnvFthnshU1@uni-berlin.de>,
Peter Pan <Marcs1102NOSPAM@Hotmail.com> wrote:
>"Teddeli" <nospam@nospam.com> wrote in message
>news:3ghsc0dek97bqd378nc078fqdns99dt90c@4ax.com
>> On 14 Jun 2004 21:09:06 GMT, hoch@exemplary.invalid (CharlesH) wrote:
>>
>>> In article <Xns95088FF96C8B0ayeemnrrcom@24.94.170.88>,
>>> Andy Yee <yeehaw@RRmn.rr.com> wrote:
>>>> According to the legend of the coverage map, pink still means
>>>> digital, but probably not native coverage...
>>>
>>> ??? We must be looking at different maps. The one I am looking at
>>> (Plans/National Plans/Coverage [America's Choice]) has the red
>>> labelled as "All-Digital" and the pink+red with the same label but
>>> without the "all-digital" phrase. So how does pink mean digital??
>>
>> Most AC maps I have seen indicate that red is native Verizon coverage,
>> Pink is Extended Network (not all services work but no extra charge)
>> Analog is usually a color other then red or pink. But then again I
>> haven't seen every map.
>
>The maps you are discussing are for networks, and *not* analog/digital.
>While the red is native verizon and all digital, the extended network (pink)
>is other providers, and whether digital or analog is up to the other
>providers (last I heard, somewhere between 80%-90% digital, but not all),
>and the grey, non network roaming, and again can be analog or digital
>depending on the provider.
>
>If all you are concerned with whether an area is analog or digital, check
>out the Data (National Access) maps. The areas shown on those maps are
>absolutely 100% digital, and allow digital data.

I STILL don't see how the AC map can be construed as native vs. extended.
One line says "all-digital", the other line does not. It seemed pretty
clear to me that the intention of the map is to tell AC users of digital
only phones where they have on-plan (no roaming charge) coverage (the
red areas), and tell AC users of trimode phones where they have on-plan
coverage (red and pink areas).

As opposed to the National Access data maps, which tells where there is
native coverage, since with few exceptions, data only works in native
VZW areas.
!