Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Miantinence

Last response: in Windows XP
Share
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 2:15:50 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I have WXP SP2 (with a cd-writer) that is humming right along with
Norton firewall & AV, Spybot, Ad-Aware, Spywareblaster, and Spyware
guard. The thing is I keep reading about backing up this and that,
registry, files. etc. Could you please tell me (or point me in the right
direction) of how and/or what I need to do? TIA

Happy Holidays; Marty

More about : miantinence

Anonymous
December 16, 2004 3:07:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Wow, what a great question. We wish more people would take such an interest
in backing up. It's the single most important thing you can do to ensure
problem-free computing.

Backup is a huge topic that is way beyond the limited scope of a newsgroup
posting. The Internet is filled with good information about backing up, and
I encourage you to read as much as you can on the subject. For a new user,
PC World Online (www.pcworld.com) will start you off in the right direction.
What follows is a very general introduction:

At a minimum, you need to backup your personal files. That means your
documents, spreadsheets, photos, music and videos. All you need to do is to
copy them to recordable CDs. Do this often, so you'll always have recent
copies of your personal files. You can save time by not backing up what
already exists elsewhere. For example: If you transferred a music CD to your
computer, there's no need to backup that if you own the CD.

For most people, the next thing to backup is their email address book and
their e-mail messages. For this you may consult Tom Koch, the unheralded
master of backing up Outlook Express. Find his instructions at Inside
Outlook Express (http://www.insideoutlookexpress.com/). You may also want to
backup your Favorites. This is most easily done within Internet Explorer: Go
to File > Import and Export and 'export' your Favorites to My Documents.
Now, your Favorites will be backed up every time you backup the contents of
My Documents.

At this point, you'll want to consider something more sophisticated than
just copying files to CDs. Time to look for backup software. There is a ton
of this available. To sort things out, look for reviews in the popular
computer e-zines, such as PC World and PC Magazine (www.pcmag.com) and CNet
(www.cnet.com). Backup software will make backing up more convenient; if
it's more convenient you'll be glad to do it more often. Windows has its own
backup software - called ntbackup - but it doesn't backup directly to CDs.

The next step is to backup your software, meaning Windows and all your
applications. Some backup software can do this, but the best way to go is
with something called 'disk imaging' software. Disk imaging gets rather
complicated, so you may want to wait until you have more experience before
trying it. Basically, an image is a bit-by-bit exact copy of your entire
hard disk. You can image your entire hard disk in minutes and restore it
just as quickly. It's the ultimate backup solution. Look at Ghost 9.0 by
Symantec and True Image 8.0 by Acronis.

System Restore is not a method of backing up. System Restore creates restore
points, which contain your registry and some essential system and user
files. The idea behind System Restore is to restore enough of the essential
guts of Windows to get you back to the user interface if you run into
trouble. From the user interface you can troubleshoot (hopefully) whatever
caused your problem in the first place.

When you need to backup your registry, just create a restore point. If there
is a problem with your registry or with one of the system or user files
contained in a restore point, you can quickly replace them with known good
copies. Don't use a restore point that is more than a few days old: the
mixture of old registry entries and new files can destabilize your system.
--
Ted Zieglar


<martymkm@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:1540-41C1B4B6-199@storefull-3114.bay.webtv.net...
> I have WXP SP2 (with a cd-writer) that is humming right along with
> Norton firewall & AV, Spybot, Ad-Aware, Spywareblaster, and Spyware
> guard. The thing is I keep reading about backing up this and that,
> registry, files. etc. Could you please tell me (or point me in the right
> direction) of how and/or what I need to do? TIA
>
> Happy Holidays; Marty
>
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 5:42:11 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

You only backup your data files you created which are ususally under
something similar to this;

C:\Documents and Settings\Marty\My Documents\
C:\Documents and Settings\Marty\My Documents\Photos
C:\Documents and Settings\Marty\My Documents\Family
C:\Documents and Settings\Marty\My Documents\Business

<martymkm@webtv.net> wrote in message
news:1540-41C1B4B6-199@storefull-3114.bay.webtv.net...
> I have WXP SP2 (with a cd-writer) that is humming right along with
> Norton firewall & AV, Spybot, Ad-Aware, Spywareblaster, and Spyware
> guard. The thing is I keep reading about backing up this and that,
> registry, files. etc. Could you please tell me (or point me in the right
> direction) of how and/or what I need to do? TIA
>
> Happy Holidays; Marty
>
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 3:42:58 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

http://www.taobackup.com/

This is funny, but there is great wisdom behind it..


--
Tumppi
Reply to group
=================================================
Most learned on nntp://news.mircosoft.com
Helsinki, Finland (remove _NOSPAM)
(translations from FI/SE not always accurate)
=================================================



"Ted Zieglar" <teddyz@notmail.com> kirjoitti viestissä
news:uhz%23AG54EHA.3908@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Wow, what a great question. We wish more people would take such an
interest
> in backing up. It's the single most important thing you can do to ensure
> problem-free computing.
>
> Backup is a huge topic that is way beyond the limited scope of a newsgroup
> posting. The Internet is filled with good information about backing up,
and
> I encourage you to read as much as you can on the subject. For a new user,
> PC World Online (www.pcworld.com) will start you off in the right
direction.
> What follows is a very general introduction:
>
> At a minimum, you need to backup your personal files. That means your
> documents, spreadsheets, photos, music and videos. All you need to do is
to
> copy them to recordable CDs. Do this often, so you'll always have recent
> copies of your personal files. You can save time by not backing up what
> already exists elsewhere. For example: If you transferred a music CD to
your
> computer, there's no need to backup that if you own the CD.
>
> For most people, the next thing to backup is their email address book and
> their e-mail messages. For this you may consult Tom Koch, the unheralded
> master of backing up Outlook Express. Find his instructions at Inside
> Outlook Express (http://www.insideoutlookexpress.com/). You may also want
to
> backup your Favorites. This is most easily done within Internet Explorer:
Go
> to File > Import and Export and 'export' your Favorites to My Documents.
> Now, your Favorites will be backed up every time you backup the contents
of
> My Documents.
>
> At this point, you'll want to consider something more sophisticated than
> just copying files to CDs. Time to look for backup software. There is a
ton
> of this available. To sort things out, look for reviews in the popular
> computer e-zines, such as PC World and PC Magazine (www.pcmag.com) and
CNet
> (www.cnet.com). Backup software will make backing up more convenient; if
> it's more convenient you'll be glad to do it more often. Windows has its
own
> backup software - called ntbackup - but it doesn't backup directly to CDs.
>
> The next step is to backup your software, meaning Windows and all your
> applications. Some backup software can do this, but the best way to go is
> with something called 'disk imaging' software. Disk imaging gets rather
> complicated, so you may want to wait until you have more experience before
> trying it. Basically, an image is a bit-by-bit exact copy of your entire
> hard disk. You can image your entire hard disk in minutes and restore it
> just as quickly. It's the ultimate backup solution. Look at Ghost 9.0 by
> Symantec and True Image 8.0 by Acronis.
>
> System Restore is not a method of backing up. System Restore creates
restore
> points, which contain your registry and some essential system and user
> files. The idea behind System Restore is to restore enough of the
essential
> guts of Windows to get you back to the user interface if you run into
> trouble. From the user interface you can troubleshoot (hopefully) whatever
> caused your problem in the first place.
>
> When you need to backup your registry, just create a restore point. If
there
> is a problem with your registry or with one of the system or user files
> contained in a restore point, you can quickly replace them with known good
> copies. Don't use a restore point that is more than a few days old: the
> mixture of old registry entries and new files can destabilize your system.
> --
> Ted Zieglar
>
>
> <martymkm@webtv.net> wrote in message
> news:1540-41C1B4B6-199@storefull-3114.bay.webtv.net...
> > I have WXP SP2 (with a cd-writer) that is humming right along with
> > Norton firewall & AV, Spybot, Ad-Aware, Spywareblaster, and Spyware
> > guard. The thing is I keep reading about backing up this and that,
> > registry, files. etc. Could you please tell me (or point me in the right
> > direction) of how and/or what I need to do? TIA
> >
> > Happy Holidays; Marty
> >
>
>
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 12:55:13 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Thanks guys for the replies. They were very enlightening and
informative. I have printed them out so I will have them in front of me
as I work on my pc. Wish me luck!

Happy Holidays; Marty
!