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Burning CDs

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Anonymous
December 24, 2004 2:17:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

The following re-post should make better sense. Apologies.

Thanks for all the responses so far. I originally asked reason for a
problem so the responses (not through lack of effort) have not been
conclusive.

Perhaps I should have asked for an answer to the problem. The problem
(requirement) is to be able to write to a CDR or CDRW (on a computer with
XPPro- SP2) in such a way that it could be universaly read by any other CD /
DVD drive irrespective of the operating system on that computer. I hope
that isn't too much of an ask.

Thanks.

Bill Ridgeway

More about : burning cds

Anonymous
December 24, 2004 2:17:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On 24/12/2004 Bill Ridgeway wrote:

> The following re-post should make better sense. Apologies.
>
> Thanks for all the responses so far. I originally asked reason for a
> problem so the responses (not through lack of effort) have not been
> conclusive.
>
> Perhaps I should have asked for an answer to the problem. The problem
> (requirement) is to be able to write to a CDR or CDRW (on a computer
> with XPPro- SP2) in such a way that it could be universaly read by
> any other CD / DVD drive irrespective of the operating system on that
> computer. I hope that isn't too much of an ask.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Bill Ridgeway

I thought your original post made sense :-)

--
Jeff Gaines
Posted with XanaNews 1.17.1.2 http://www.wilsonc.demon.co.uk/delphi.htm
Anonymous
December 24, 2004 2:17:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Use IS09660/Joliet formatting software (
http://www.piesoftwareinc.co.uk/textonly/is09660.html) and do not do any
multisession burns. Some CD-Roms might have trouble with reading
multisessions. XP's built in software use the IS09660/Joliet format as does
Nero, Easy Media Creator, Record NowMax and freeware burning programs like
CDBurnerXP .

Avoid using packet writing software like InCD or DLA as another computer
might need special software to read the disk

--

Harry Ohrn MS-MVP [Shell/User]
www.webtree.ca/windowsxp


"Bill Ridgeway" <info@1001solutions.co.uk> wrote in message
news:eVSyd.131$LF5.28@newsfe5-win.ntli.net...
> The following re-post should make better sense. Apologies.
>
> Thanks for all the responses so far. I originally asked reason for a
> problem so the responses (not through lack of effort) have not been
> conclusive.
>
> Perhaps I should have asked for an answer to the problem. The problem
> (requirement) is to be able to write to a CDR or CDRW (on a computer with
> XPPro- SP2) in such a way that it could be universaly read by any other CD
> /
> DVD drive irrespective of the operating system on that computer. I hope
> that isn't too much of an ask.
>
> Thanks.
>
> Bill Ridgeway
>
Anonymous
December 24, 2004 2:17:31 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

On Fri, 24 Dec 2004 11:17:30 GMT, Bill Ridgeway wrote:

> Perhaps I should have asked for an answer to the problem. The problem
> (requirement) is to be able to write to a CDR or CDRW (on a computer with
> XPPro- SP2) in such a way that it could be universaly read by any other CD /
> DVD drive irrespective of the operating system on that computer. I hope
> that isn't too much of an ask.

Bill, if you write to a CDR or CDRW in one swipe using XP's burning - it
can be read by *most* other computers. There is no guarantee or setting
that can help to insure this. If doing multiple writes to a disk
(multisession), the chances of it being usable on any computer will go down
as not all cd drives (CDrom or burners) are capable reading multisession
disks.

If you use third party burning software, you'll find settings specifically
for this. Usually the option reads very much like this: "Make a CD that can
be read on any computer" Most burning software will also allow multiple
writes before "closing" or "finalizing" the CD for general distribution. I
believe this route is much more effective and reliable in getting results
that will be usable by most (if not all) drives.

Caveat: A drive with poor reading capabilities may have problems - example:
older drive that is not reading as well as it once did. This would be true
with any media and especially true if low quality media is used. Less
quality in the media means less reflectivity - something the drives depend
on to read the disks.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
!