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Linux startup error

Last response: in Linux/Free BSD
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July 5, 2004 7:15:38 PM

The non-working mouse error: <A HREF="http://random.7host.com/uploaded/images/NuclearGerber/A..." target="_new">Picture</A>
I installed a new graphics (radeon 9800) driver, and after restarting it, I get an error about the graphic desktop.

I can choose either to start as that black console, or to let it choose the generic driver it had earlier.
When the generic driver is loaded and linux restarts itself, I get a settings window on the desktop (with some display options), but I can't click anything.

Both the mouse and the keyboard aren't working then, and I have no idea what to do.
..and I know nothing about linux, so I dont know what to do with the text mode.


help ;/



<P ID="edit"><FONT SIZE=-1><EM>Edited by qwomg on 07/05/04 03:46 PM.</EM></FONT></P>

More about : linux startup error

July 7, 2004 3:55:47 AM

Your computer thinks your mouse is connected at /dev/input/mice when it's really somewhere else. You need to do 2 things:

1. Find out where your mouse is connected. This is probably /dev/mouse or /dev/psaux if you have a ps2 mouse. You can find this out by looking at the output as your computer boots up to see where it detects the mouse. If you miss it, issue the command

dmesg |less

at the command prompt and scroll up and down until you find where it says your mouse is detected. <ctrl> <z> will get you out of dmesg when you're done reading it.

2. Edit your /etc/X11/XF86Config file.

To do this just open up a text editor and edit the file. I don't know exactly which editor you have so you might have to try a few:

nano -w /etc/X11/XF86Config
pico /etc/X11/XF86Config
vi /etc/X11/XF86Config

One of those should work. Make sure you're logged in as root to do this though, or else you won't be able to edit the file. Once the file is open scroll along until you see the mouse section. Put the device name you found in.

You should be good to go.

Of course, if it doesn't work, then just run xf86config at a command prompt again to generate a new XF86Config file.

One question: did you run the ati driver setup program? fglrxconfig it's called. You should have a /etc/X11/XF86Config-4 file that the ati drivers use. This is generated by running fglrxconfig. Make sure you have that before you do anything else.

s signature has been formatted to fit your scr
July 7, 2004 4:11:03 AM

I just took a closer look at your screenshot.

It says:

Quote:
Using config file: "/etc/X11/XF86Config"
xf86OpenSerial: cannot open device /dev/input/mice
No such device.


I'm guessing you somehow set your mouse as a serial mouse when you don't really have one. Just re-run xf86config and fglrxconfig and select "auto" for the mouse type. It usually works fine.

s signature has been formatted to fit your scr
!