Why should so much tweaking be necessary?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....

Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things should have
gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than the other way
around.

I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be able
to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we have a
whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and web sites
devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.

We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just to be
able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.

Lois
17 answers Last reply
More about tweaking necessary
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    When new gadgets, accessories and luxuries are added to an automobile do you
    not have to re-educate yourself in their correct and proper usage?

    --
    Regards,

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

    If you knew as much as you thought you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


    "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote in message
    news:OQU1%23py7EHA.3856@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    >
    > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things should
    > have gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than the other
    > way around.
    >
    > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be able
    > to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we have a
    > whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and web sites
    > devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    >
    > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just to be
    > able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.
    >
    > Lois
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Richard Urban wrote:
    > When new gadgets, accessories and luxuries are added to an automobile do you
    > not have to re-educate yourself in their correct and proper usage?


    Thats why I still Have an OLD 1989 Vehicle.. Those NEW gadgets are
    un-necessary.. just more money for the manufactures.. no sence of
    BUYING something That HAS GADGETS that you DONNOT need

    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote in message
    news:OQU1%23py7EHA.3856@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    >
    > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things should
    > have gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than the other
    > way around.
    >
    > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be able
    > to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we have a
    > whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and web sites
    > devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    >
    > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just to be
    > able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.
    >
    > Lois
    >

    Depends on what you mean by "tweaking" but by my definition, no, you really
    don't need to fiddle with a lot of settings to be up and running. Of course
    it also depends on the programs you're running and what you want to
    accomplish. But the operating system doesn't need much from you at all. On
    the other hand, you can spend hours playing with colors, screensavers,
    backgrounds, sound schemes, etc., none of which are necessary. Things like
    system updates have become more automated, so that's become easier. And
    Windows "help" files have become a lot better. Some things are done a bit
    differently, but I don't think they've become more difficult at all.

    Consider the telephone. Way back when, you picked it up and told the
    operator who to connect you with. A cell phone nowadays has a lot of buttons
    and gadgets. It has the same basic function -- to call somebody -- but a new
    phone includes a lot of functions that never existed before, so there's some
    learning curve.

    Some people tweak because they like to. And people have different learning
    styles. Some are comfortable with the idea of clicking buttons and figuring
    out how to do things, while others want detailed instructions and
    explanations.
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Ah, but that's the difference -- when a new gadget, say a satellite tracking
    system, is put in a fancy new car, the steering wheel still turns left and
    right the way it used to, you don't have to relearn how to open and close
    the door, etc. You generally have to only learn to use the ADDED
    capabilities .. even if you have remote entry, you can choose not to use it
    and use the key. The problem, as Lois G. points out, is that one has to
    relearn to drive from the very basics with each new updated operating
    system. All of sudden the gear shift has moved behind the driver's seat and
    it's a rotary dial instead of a stick, and you have to hold in the cigarette
    lighter before it works. The real problem is that this stuff is all
    designed by people whose very lives revolve around computers, and
    specifically Windows, using state of the art hardware, and unlike auto
    manufacturers no one seems to have checked in with ordinary drivers/users
    (as opposed to racing buffs or heads of corporate systems departments).

    There is also the problem that it takes education and expertise to do simple
    things simply and to stay out of trouble, although things are getting
    somewhat better -- e.g., computers ship with the system settings wide open
    to vulnarabilites, and to make them secure the user has to restrict browser
    and email settings (or get other software), install virus and firewall, etc.
    Rationally, the DEFAULT would be for secure systems, allowing the user to
    open them up for specific purposes as they gain an idea of what they're
    doing and (hopefully) the dangers involved.

    "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote ..
    > When new gadgets, accessories and luxuries are added to an automobile do
    you
    > not have to re-educate yourself in their correct and proper usage?
    >
    >
    > "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote ...
    > > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    > >
    > > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things should
    > > have gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than the
    other
    > > way around.
    > >
    > > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be
    able
    > > to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we have a
    > > whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and web
    sites
    > > devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    > >
    > > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just to
    be
    > > able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote in message
    news:OQU1%23py7EHA.3856@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    >
    > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things
    > should have gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather
    > than the other way around.

    The mantra of a non-user. Computer are not to make your life easier.
    They are to maintain or raise your level of frustration - just like
    having kids.

    > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be
    > able to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we
    > have a whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and
    > web sites devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    >
    > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just
    > to be able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.


    In reply to the topic of your post (rather than its content), you could
    always pay someone to do all that tweaking for you if you could
    adequately describe just exactly what you wanted in a computer and
    operating system. It is a general-purpose computer, not a fixed-feature
    dishwasher. Ignorance and laziness, especially when deliberate, always
    have their cost.
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Yeah! Right!

    And I remember when my Grandfather broke off the ignition key in his Rambler
    because he didn't read that the car had a PUSH BUTTON transmission and you
    had to push one of the buttons to start the engine!

    You have to learn and re-educate yourself to the technology!

    --
    Regards,

    Richard Urban

    aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

    If you knew as much as you thought you know,
    You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


    "ggull" <ggullSPAM@NOTrcn.com> wrote in message
    news:uXdcJf27EHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > Ah, but that's the difference -- when a new gadget, say a satellite
    > tracking
    > system, is put in a fancy new car, the steering wheel still turns left and
    > right the way it used to, you don't have to relearn how to open and close
    > the door, etc. You generally have to only learn to use the ADDED
    > capabilities .. even if you have remote entry, you can choose not to use
    > it
    > and use the key. The problem, as Lois G. points out, is that one has to
    > relearn to drive from the very basics with each new updated operating
    > system. All of sudden the gear shift has moved behind the driver's seat
    > and
    > it's a rotary dial instead of a stick, and you have to hold in the
    > cigarette
    > lighter before it works. The real problem is that this stuff is all
    > designed by people whose very lives revolve around computers, and
    > specifically Windows, using state of the art hardware, and unlike auto
    > manufacturers no one seems to have checked in with ordinary drivers/users
    > (as opposed to racing buffs or heads of corporate systems departments).
    >
    > There is also the problem that it takes education and expertise to do
    > simple
    > things simply and to stay out of trouble, although things are getting
    > somewhat better -- e.g., computers ship with the system settings wide open
    > to vulnarabilites, and to make them secure the user has to restrict
    > browser
    > and email settings (or get other software), install virus and firewall,
    > etc.
    > Rationally, the DEFAULT would be for secure systems, allowing the user to
    > open them up for specific purposes as they gain an idea of what they're
    > doing and (hopefully) the dangers involved.
    >
    > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote ..
    >> When new gadgets, accessories and luxuries are added to an automobile do
    > you
    >> not have to re-educate yourself in their correct and proper usage?
    >>
    >>
    >> "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote ...
    >> > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    >> >
    >> > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things should
    >> > have gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than the
    > other
    >> > way around.
    >> >
    >> > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be
    > able
    >> > to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we have a
    >> > whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and web
    > sites
    >> > devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    >> >
    >> > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just to
    > be
    >> > able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.
    >
    >
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    I get upset that there is no instruction manuel with a computer. Why can't
    all of the programs that are running in the background be documented with
    clear instructions of what can be removed?

    How many programs are only available from the "RUN" command with no
    documentation.

    "Lois G." wrote:

    > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    >
    > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things should have
    > gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than the other way
    > around.
    >
    > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be able
    > to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we have a
    > whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and web sites
    > devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    >
    > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just to be
    > able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.
    >
    > Lois
    >
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Lois;
    There are choices.
    If you did not find them you did not ask first.
    Windows is an OS a great many can choose:
    http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product_listing.gsp?cat=96356&path=0%3A3944%3A3951%3A41937%3A96356
    There are also other options if you look or ask.

    --
    Jupiter Jones [MVP]
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote in message
    news:%23OCNTl57EHA.3076@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    > I have to differ with you here, unless I'm wrong, but when shopping for a
    > new computer, I didn't see any choices in operating systems (unless I
    > wanted a MAC) other than XP Home or XP Professional.
    >
    > Lois
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Full documentation in print would take far more space than your entire
    computer system...even if your tower and monitor were large.
    That would add quite a bit of cost to the computer when in the past most
    never touched the books since the pile was intimidating..

    Or would you rather have all the information online?
    Start/Help and Support...most of it is there.
    Open almost any program and click Help on the top toolbar...most of what you
    need to know about the specific program is there.
    Something still missing?
    Try Google, newsgroups or any of an almost unlimited sources.

    --
    Jupiter Jones [MVP]
    http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/


    "Mickey" <Mickey@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:C33E6670-E640-496B-834C-CAB73757E22B@microsoft.com...
    >I get upset that there is no instruction manuel with a computer. Why can't
    > all of the programs that are running in the background be documented with
    > clear instructions of what can be removed?
    >
    > How many programs are only available from the "RUN" command with no
    > documentation.
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    And, your old 1989 vehicle cannot spell check or give you proper grammar
    information!
    |
    | Thats why I still Have an OLD 1989 Vehicle.. Those NEW gadgets are
    | un-necessary.. just more money for the manufactures.. no sence of
    | BUYING something That HAS GADGETS that you DONNOT need
    |
    | >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Tom Pepper Willett wrote:

    > And, your old 1989 vehicle cannot spell check or give you proper grammar
    > information!


    I think I do pretty good for a ONE-Handed Person!!

    > |
    > | Thats why I still Have an OLD 1989 Vehicle.. Those NEW gadgets are
    > | un-necessary.. just more money for the manufactures.. no sence of
    > | BUYING something That HAS GADGETS that you DONNOT need
    > |
    > | >
    >
    >
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote in message
    news:%23OCNTl57EHA.3076@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
    >
    > I have to differ with you here, unless I'm wrong, but when shopping
    > for a new computer, I didn't see any choices in operating systems
    > (unless I wanted a MAC) other than XP Home or XP Professional.
    >
    > Lois
    >


    Well, what operating system did you expect to find at a retail store?
    The largest selling one or one they couldn't make a dime on? You often
    see what you expect to see. Since you were out shopping for Windows
    platforms than that is what you saw because you limited where you went
    to go see.
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    What I am asking for is just a list of available programs and what they do.
    If you don't even know that a program exists how can you ask for info. For
    example how would I know that REGEDIT and MSCONFIG exist if I had not seen it
    mentioned in many newsgroups. There are instructions but you must search for
    them to find them.

    "Jupiter Jones [MVP]" wrote:

    > Full documentation in print would take far more space than your entire
    > computer system...even if your tower and monitor were large.
    > That would add quite a bit of cost to the computer when in the past most
    > never touched the books since the pile was intimidating..
    >
    > Or would you rather have all the information online?
    > Start/Help and Support...most of it is there.
    > Open almost any program and click Help on the top toolbar...most of what you
    > need to know about the specific program is there.
    > Something still missing?
    > Try Google, newsgroups or any of an almost unlimited sources.
    >
    > --
    > Jupiter Jones [MVP]
    > http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/
    >
    >
    > "Mickey" <Mickey@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:C33E6670-E640-496B-834C-CAB73757E22B@microsoft.com...
    > >I get upset that there is no instruction manuel with a computer. Why can't
    > > all of the programs that are running in the background be documented with
    > > clear instructions of what can be removed?
    > >
    > > How many programs are only available from the "RUN" command with no
    > > documentation.
    >
    >
    >
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    This sounds like an early version of the safety provision that the car has
    to be in Park or Neutral before the engine will start. That's pretty common
    now, but if a note to this effect was simply buried in the fine print of a
    1000 shop page manual (not included) for one of the first cars to have that
    precaution, then the Rambler folk (Dodge, wasn't it?) were not doing their
    job of highlighting major changes for the purchaser. Didn't he get a test
    drive before purchase? What about the dealer/seller who failed to mention
    this?

    If it was not a safety feature to force you to have the car in park/neutral,
    i.e. if they simply made you put the ignition key in then press a button to
    start rather than turn the key like I presume most cars did at the time, it
    was a stupid feature and deserved to follow the passenger pigeon into
    oblivion, which it seems to have done.

    I and Lois G are not complaining about genuine new technology (e.g. an
    interlock to prevent your grandfather starting the Rambler and immediately
    running your childhood self over because it was in reverse). We are
    complaining about capricious twiddling with the user interfaces for the same
    technology, e.g. if the Rambler were done that way just to be cool.

    After some years of such capricious twiddling, auto makers have settled down
    to doing most major functions in two or three ways (e.g. lights are on a
    control onthe steeering column, or, less and less commonly, a pull switch on
    the dash) and many in just one. Some rental agencies put a card summarizing
    these differences in their cars, and it's not big. I can jump in pretty
    much any standard sedan at the rental agency, and in two or three minutes
    familiarize myself with the needed controls to get to the hotel at 2 in the
    morning.

    Of course operating systems are more complex (in terms of user interface)
    than automobiles. But this should be an argument against, not an excuse
    for, twiddling just 'cause.


    "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote ...
    > Yeah! Right!
    >
    > And I remember when my Grandfather broke off the ignition key in his
    Rambler
    > because he didn't read that the car had a PUSH BUTTON transmission and you
    > had to push one of the buttons to start the engine!
    >
    > You have to learn and re-educate yourself to the technology!
    >
    > --
    > Regards,
    >
    > Richard Urban
    >
    > aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    >
    > If you knew as much as you thought you know,
    > You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
    >
    >
    > "ggull" <ggullSPAM@NOTrcn.com> wrote in message
    > news:uXdcJf27EHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    > > Ah, but that's the difference -- when a new gadget, say a satellite
    > > tracking
    > > system, is put in a fancy new car, the steering wheel still turns left
    and
    > > right the way it used to, you don't have to relearn how to open and
    close
    > > the door, etc. You generally have to only learn to use the ADDED
    > > capabilities .. even if you have remote entry, you can choose not to use
    > > it
    > > and use the key. The problem, as Lois G. points out, is that one has to
    > > relearn to drive from the very basics with each new updated operating
    > > system. All of sudden the gear shift has moved behind the driver's seat
    > > and
    > > it's a rotary dial instead of a stick, and you have to hold in the
    > > cigarette
    > > lighter before it works. The real problem is that this stuff is all
    > > designed by people whose very lives revolve around computers, and
    > > specifically Windows, using state of the art hardware, and unlike auto
    > > manufacturers no one seems to have checked in with ordinary
    drivers/users
    > > (as opposed to racing buffs or heads of corporate systems departments).
    > >
    > > There is also the problem that it takes education and expertise to do
    > > simple
    > > things simply and to stay out of trouble, although things are getting
    > > somewhat better -- e.g., computers ship with the system settings wide
    open
    > > to vulnarabilites, and to make them secure the user has to restrict
    > > browser
    > > and email settings (or get other software), install virus and firewall,
    > > etc.
    > > Rationally, the DEFAULT would be for secure systems, allowing the user
    to
    > > open them up for specific purposes as they gain an idea of what they're
    > > doing and (hopefully) the dangers involved.
    > >
    > > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote ..
    > >> When new gadgets, accessories and luxuries are added to an automobile
    do
    > > you
    > >> not have to re-educate yourself in their correct and proper usage?
    > >>
    > >>
    > >> "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote ...
    > >> > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    > >> >
    > >> > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things
    should
    > >> > have gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than the
    > > other
    > >> > way around.
    > >> >
    > >> > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought I'd be
    > > able
    > >> > to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we have
    a
    > >> > whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and web
    > > sites
    > >> > devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    > >> >
    > >> > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes just
    to
    > > be
    > >> > able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "ggull" <ggullSPAM@NOTrcn.com> wrote in message
    news:u%23djvZb8EHA.3908@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > This sounds like an early version of the safety provision that the car
    > has
    > to be in Park or Neutral before the engine will start. That's pretty
    > common
    > now, but if a note to this effect was simply buried in the fine print
    > of a
    > 1000 shop page manual (not included) for one of the first cars to have
    > that
    > precaution, then the Rambler folk (Dodge, wasn't it?) were not doing
    > their
    > job of highlighting major changes for the purchaser. Didn't he get a
    > test
    > drive before purchase? What about the dealer/seller who failed to
    > mention
    > this?
    >
    > If it was not a safety feature to force you to have the car in
    > park/neutral,
    > i.e. if they simply made you put the ignition key in then press a
    > button to
    > start rather than turn the key like I presume most cars did at the
    > time, it
    > was a stupid feature and deserved to follow the passenger pigeon into
    > oblivion, which it seems to have done.
    >
    > I and Lois G are not complaining about genuine new technology (e.g. an
    > interlock to prevent your grandfather starting the Rambler and
    > immediately
    > running your childhood self over because it was in reverse). We are
    > complaining about capricious twiddling with the user interfaces for
    > the same
    > technology, e.g. if the Rambler were done that way just to be cool.
    >
    > After some years of such capricious twiddling, auto makers have
    > settled down
    > to doing most major functions in two or three ways (e.g. lights are on
    > a
    > control onthe steeering column, or, less and less commonly, a pull
    > switch on
    > the dash) and many in just one. Some rental agencies put a card
    > summarizing
    > these differences in their cars, and it's not big. I can jump in
    > pretty
    > much any standard sedan at the rental agency, and in two or three
    > minutes
    > familiarize myself with the needed controls to get to the hotel at 2
    > in the
    > morning.
    >
    > Of course operating systems are more complex (in terms of user
    > interface)
    > than automobiles. But this should be an argument against, not an
    > excuse
    > for, twiddling just 'cause.
    >
    >
    > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote ...
    >> Yeah! Right!
    >>
    >> And I remember when my Grandfather broke off the ignition key in his
    > Rambler
    >> because he didn't read that the car had a PUSH BUTTON transmission
    >> and you
    >> had to push one of the buttons to start the engine!
    >>
    >> You have to learn and re-educate yourself to the technology!
    >>
    >> --
    >> Regards,
    >>
    >> Richard Urban
    >>
    >> aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)
    >>
    >> If you knew as much as you thought you know,
    >> You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
    >>
    >>
    >> "ggull" <ggullSPAM@NOTrcn.com> wrote in message
    >> news:uXdcJf27EHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
    >> > Ah, but that's the difference -- when a new gadget, say a satellite
    >> > tracking
    >> > system, is put in a fancy new car, the steering wheel still turns
    >> > left
    > and
    >> > right the way it used to, you don't have to relearn how to open and
    > close
    >> > the door, etc. You generally have to only learn to use the ADDED
    >> > capabilities .. even if you have remote entry, you can choose not
    >> > to use
    >> > it
    >> > and use the key. The problem, as Lois G. points out, is that one
    >> > has to
    >> > relearn to drive from the very basics with each new updated
    >> > operating
    >> > system. All of sudden the gear shift has moved behind the driver's
    >> > seat
    >> > and
    >> > it's a rotary dial instead of a stick, and you have to hold in the
    >> > cigarette
    >> > lighter before it works. The real problem is that this stuff is
    >> > all
    >> > designed by people whose very lives revolve around computers, and
    >> > specifically Windows, using state of the art hardware, and unlike
    >> > auto
    >> > manufacturers no one seems to have checked in with ordinary
    > drivers/users
    >> > (as opposed to racing buffs or heads of corporate systems
    >> > departments).
    >> >
    >> > There is also the problem that it takes education and expertise to
    >> > do
    >> > simple
    >> > things simply and to stay out of trouble, although things are
    >> > getting
    >> > somewhat better -- e.g., computers ship with the system settings
    >> > wide
    > open
    >> > to vulnarabilites, and to make them secure the user has to restrict
    >> > browser
    >> > and email settings (or get other software), install virus and
    >> > firewall,
    >> > etc.
    >> > Rationally, the DEFAULT would be for secure systems, allowing the
    >> > user
    > to
    >> > open them up for specific purposes as they gain an idea of what
    >> > they're
    >> > doing and (hopefully) the dangers involved.
    >> >
    >> > "Richard Urban" <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote ..
    >> >> When new gadgets, accessories and luxuries are added to an
    >> >> automobile
    > do
    >> > you
    >> >> not have to re-educate yourself in their correct and proper usage?
    >> >>
    >> >>
    >> >> "Lois G." <legalois10pounds@erols.com> wrote ...
    >> >> > Strictly a rhetorical question, I guess....
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't help but feel that things
    > should
    >> >> > have gotten easier with the evolvement of computers, rather than
    >> >> > the
    >> > other
    >> >> > way around.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > I'm not new to computers, just new to XP. I mistakenly thought
    >> >> > I'd be
    >> > able
    >> >> > to hook up and go, but that doesn't seem to be the case. Here we
    >> >> > have
    > a
    >> >> > whole host of newsgroups dealing with every specific issue, and
    >> >> > web
    >> > sites
    >> >> > devoted to fixes, tweaks, upgrades, etc.
    >> >> >
    >> >> > We have to re-educate ourselves, ask questions and read volumes
    >> >> > just
    > to
    >> > be
    >> >> > able to perform 'simpl' tasks on our computers.
    >> >
    >> >
    >>
    >>
    >
    >


    And over how many years has it taken for the auto makers to "settle
    down" into a standard with which you finally trained yourself to be
    accustomed? And how long do operating systems, especially "toy" or
    end-user oriented operating systems, like Windows, get to "settle down"?
    So I take it you'll be complaining to the car makers when they change a
    whole bunch of stuff in the new all-electric cars, too, until whatever
    period you deem is sufficient for them to "settle down" (but mostly for
    you to train).

    If anything, computers should be teaching you to adapt. You don't want
    to adapt. Adapting takes work and time. Computers are not appliances.
    Hardware and software for computers is not like hardware for plumbing
    where once you figure out how to cut, clean, and solder or glue (for
    plastic) then you have very little to learn thereafter because the
    technology doesn't change. Part of the *technology* of computers is
    SOFTware.

    Also, for end-user oriented operating systems, especially those geared
    to *consumers* rather than enthusiasts or administrators willing to
    adapt and train, they need some continued marketability and
    profitability. Once they become staid, sales drop. Look at VCRs. Once
    they peak at what functionality they provided then eventually the market
    saturates (since only some of the population is going to get a VCR and
    eventually almost all of those have a VCR). So how do they sell more
    VCRs when they all must provide the same basic functionality for
    compatibility? Add features! An OS, or any product, that doesn't
    sustain marketability will die, and then you'll complain that it
    disappeared when it became cheap (to get and to learn). Microsoft is
    into COMMERCIALware. That's the market type they choose to get involved
    in. If you want to get into open-sourced and cheap operating systems
    that YOU can tailor the way you want to run (and keep them tailored that
    way) then go right ahead. Distributing public or open software is how
    THOSE authors choose to distribute their product. However, I really
    doubt Linux or other open-source operating systems are really
    deliberately stagnating themselves for lazy users.

    How long are "personal" operating systems allowed to mature? How long
    before they are no longer allowed to adopt from mainframes? How long
    before no one wants any new *major* features? How long did it take for
    you to grow up until you no longer needed any training (in other
    attributes of your life than computers) so you could quiesce into being
    lazy, comfortable, stagnant, and happy?

    It's impossible to analyze an industry, especially computers, when you
    view it through a tiny pinhole in the wall. You see your use of your
    computer, not what is happening across the entire industry of computers
    (and I only see a tiny part). I've been an alpha test for over a decade
    in software and a technician on them for a decade before that. Yeah,
    I'm used to change because that is the nature of the computer industry.
    It isn't ditch digging whose technology hasn't changed much in
    centuries. If you get involved in an industry whose nature is change
    and continual evolution then learn to adapt. I'm sure doctors also have
    to keep up to date and have to keep learning new stuff and techniques;
    otherwise, we'd still be using leeches, hacking off wounded legs, and
    seeing Joan Rivers for how she really would look.

    There used to be LOTS of backyard mechanics working on their cars to fix
    and customize them. That's waned. Why? Because it is a lot harder to
    work on engines, pollution systems, and all the subsystems within a car
    because they've become a lot more complicated. You used to just need a
    timing light, a new set of spark plugs and gap tool, and maybe a new
    distributor rotor to time your car. Not anymore. It now takes a lot
    more learning to maintain your car yourself, so the folks that chose to
    stagnate based on the old technology gave up on maintaining their cars,
    and those too lazy or too busy for other life choices relinquish that
    chore to someone else. I don't see you announcing your willingness to
    let a professional handle your wants for tweaking and maintaining and
    repairing your computer, yet you probably take your car to a shop to
    replace the oil, set timing, replace the shocks, align the wheels, and
    fix the body damage. Your time is too valuable to waste doing that
    stuff so you exchange your time (in the form of money) to have someone
    else do it and do it right. However, most computer users are peculiar
    consumers in believing they have the mental wherewithal to be computer
    experts (picture the car mechanic all greased up who strolls into the
    surgery room to start replacing a heart just because he knows how to use
    a knife). Just because a computer can be put into your hands doesn't
    mean it should. I can put a shotgun into the hands of a toddler (which
    isn't necessarily measured by age), and the same for a computer. You're
    the consumer that wants computers to stabilize so they can be considered
    appliances, yet do you actually go repairing your dishwasher, fridge, or
    television when it breaks or even modify them to tweak them how you want
    them behave on any particular day? If you don't want to learn and
    continually train on the use of computers to play your game, just get a
    GameBoy with its fixed features and interface. That GameBoy will work
    the same way until the day you trash it. There are intelligent
    typewriters with limited functionality and fixed interface that will let
    you do word processing. There are appliances available if all you want
    is a fix feature set and unchanging user interface rather than a
    GENERAL-purpose computer.

    If you don't want to learn a new OS or a new application then don't get
    that new OS or new application. It is likely you don't _need_ the new
    stuff but rather you _want_ the new stuff (the same reason most
    consumers buy new cars). I still have an old Intel 486 running Windows
    95 and some ancient version of WordPerfect on it that I still use. It
    doesn't boot quick but that's not a problem because it's left powered on
    all the time. The cursor doesn't move any slower when typing in a
    document on that old machine compared to my new one and there is little
    difference in paging speed for the size documents that I write at home.
    There is no real need for the latest hardware and software to perform
    the task, but most consumers don't base their purchasing decisions based
    on just the requirements of the task.

    Burn and learn. Learn or stagnate. Stagnate and die. If tomorrow is
    just like today, you're dead. ;-)
  16. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    "Vanguard" <see_signature> wrote
    > I've been an alpha test[er, sic] for over a decade
    > in software and a technician on them for a decade before that.

    This explains a lot :-)
  17. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    How do you know that a program exists? Suggest you go into Windows
    Explorer, sort to alphabetical order and try (double click) each one of the
    files described in 'type' as 'application'. Some may not work.

    Regards.

    Bill Ridgeway

    "Mickey" <Mickey@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:FD1726E8-4882-4C4D-9BB7-C0854AA3150A@microsoft.com...
    > What I am asking for is just a list of available programs and what they
    > do.
    > If you don't even know that a program exists how can you ask for info. For
    > example how would I know that REGEDIT and MSCONFIG exist if I had not seen
    > it
    > mentioned in many newsgroups. There are instructions but you must search
    > for
    > them to find them.
    >
    > "Jupiter Jones [MVP]" wrote:
    >
    >> Full documentation in print would take far more space than your entire
    >> computer system...even if your tower and monitor were large.
    >> That would add quite a bit of cost to the computer when in the past most
    >> never touched the books since the pile was intimidating..
    >>
    >> Or would you rather have all the information online?
    >> Start/Help and Support...most of it is there.
    >> Open almost any program and click Help on the top toolbar...most of what
    >> you
    >> need to know about the specific program is there.
    >> Something still missing?
    >> Try Google, newsgroups or any of an almost unlimited sources.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jupiter Jones [MVP]
    >> http://www3.telus.net/dandemar/
    >>
    >>
    >> "Mickey" <Mickey@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    >> news:C33E6670-E640-496B-834C-CAB73757E22B@microsoft.com...
    >> >I get upset that there is no instruction manuel with a computer. Why
    >> >can't
    >> > all of the programs that are running in the background be documented
    >> > with
    >> > clear instructions of what can be removed?
    >> >
    >> > How many programs are only available from the "RUN" command with no
    >> > documentation.
    >>
    >>
    >>
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