Problems copying a very large file

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

I have 2 external hard drives. I am attempting to copy a large (4.19 GB)
file from one to the other. Tje destination drive has 32 GB of free space
but each time I attempt to do the copy,Windows tells me there is not enough
space available on the target drive.

I am mystified.

Any suggestions?

Sheena
4 answers Last reply
More about problems copying large file
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On 01/02/2005 The Lurker At The Threshold wrote:

    > I have 2 external hard drives. I am attempting to copy a large (4.19
    > GB) file from one to the other. Tje destination drive has 32 GB of
    > free space but each time I attempt to do the copy,Windows tells me
    > there is not enough space available on the target drive.
    >
    > I am mystified.
    >
    > Any suggestions?
    >
    > Sheena


    Many external hard drives are formatted with the FAT32 file system
    which has a maximum file size of just under 4GB, the message from XP is
    a bit obscure.

    You can check the type of file system by right clicking on the drive in
    Explorer and selecting 'Properties'.

    If it is FAT32 you can convert it by opening a Command Prompt and
    typing:

    convert x: /FS:NTFS

    where 'x' is the drive letter.

    You really should back up all the data on the drive before you do this,
    it can go wrong (although luckily it never has for me).

    The maximum file size for NTFS is only limited by the size of the
    disk/partition.

    A couple of 'gotchas'

    (a) If you convert to NTFS the disk won't be readable by earlier
    versions of Windows such as 95, 98 and ME so if you use it to transfer
    files between these systems you would lose that ability.

    (b) If you back up all the data first (preferably to two different
    locations) you could then re-format the drive from scratch with NTFS,
    it will give you a clean start and perhaps slightly faster access to
    your data.


    --
    Jeff Gaines
    Posted with XanaNews 1.17.2.1
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    In news:xn0dy2t659gfl0000@news.microsoft.com,
    Jeff Gaines <whitedragon@newsgroup.nospam> typed:

    > If it is FAT32 you can convert it by opening a Command Prompt
    > and
    > typing:
    >
    > convert x: /FS:NTFS
    >
    > where 'x' is the drive letter.


    Yes, but that will likely result in 512 byte clusters, which can
    adversely affect performance. Read
    http://www.aumha.org/a/ntfscvt.htm before doing this.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    On 03/02/2005 Ken Blake wrote:

    > In news:xn0dy2t659gfl0000@news.microsoft.com,
    > Jeff Gaines <whitedragon@newsgroup.nospam> typed:
    >
    > > If it is FAT32 you can convert it by opening a Command Prompt
    > > and
    > > typing:
    > >
    > > convert x: /FS:NTFS
    > >
    > > where 'x' is the drive letter.
    >
    >
    > Yes, but that will likely result in 512 byte clusters, which can
    > adversely affect performance. Read
    > http://www.aumha.org/a/ntfscvt.htm before doing this.


    You managed to snip the last bit of my post where I said:

    (b) If you back up all the data first (preferably to two different
    locations) you could then re-format the drive from scratch with NTFS,
    it will give you a clean start and perhaps slightly faster access to
    your data.


    --
    Jeff Gaines
    Posted with XanaNews 1.17.2.1
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.newusers (More info?)

    Good idea. I missed that one completely. The drive is formatted as FAT 32
    OTOH...
    Earlier today, at a losss as to what else to do, I imaged my C: drive to the
    external HD in question. Acronis True Image was able to perform the imaging,
    creating two images of slightly more than 4 GBs each.
    Good solutions lead to more puzzels.

    Sheena

    "Jeff Gaines" <whitedragon@newsgroup.nospam> wrote in message
    news:xn0dy2t659gfl0000@news.microsoft.com...
    > On 01/02/2005 The Lurker At The Threshold wrote:
    >
    >> I have 2 external hard drives. I am attempting to copy a large (4.19
    >> GB) file from one to the other. Tje destination drive has 32 GB of
    >> free space but each time I attempt to do the copy,Windows tells me
    >> there is not enough space available on the target drive.
    >>
    >> I am mystified.
    >>
    >> Any suggestions?
    >>
    >> Sheena
    >
    >
    > Many external hard drives are formatted with the FAT32 file system
    > which has a maximum file size of just under 4GB, the message from XP is
    > a bit obscure.
    >
    > You can check the type of file system by right clicking on the drive in
    > Explorer and selecting 'Properties'.
    >
    > If it is FAT32 you can convert it by opening a Command Prompt and
    > typing:
    >
    > convert x: /FS:NTFS
    >
    > where 'x' is the drive letter.
    >
    > You really should back up all the data on the drive before you do this,
    > it can go wrong (although luckily it never has for me).
    >
    > The maximum file size for NTFS is only limited by the size of the
    > disk/partition.
    >
    > A couple of 'gotchas'
    >
    > (a) If you convert to NTFS the disk won't be readable by earlier
    > versions of Windows such as 95, 98 and ME so if you use it to transfer
    > files between these systems you would lose that ability.
    >
    > (b) If you back up all the data first (preferably to two different
    > locations) you could then re-format the drive from scratch with NTFS,
    > it will give you a clean start and perhaps slightly faster access to
    > your data.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Gaines
    > Posted with XanaNews 1.17.2.1
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