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WEP Key

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  • Wireless Network
  • WEP
  • Wireless Networking
Last response: in Wireless Networking
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Anonymous
September 2, 2004 6:03:44 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hi All...

Can someone point me in the right direction on how to setup WEP keys for my
wireless network at home? I attempted to do it but all I did was deny
access to my router... I'm lost..

Please help,

Carl

More about : wep key

Anonymous
September 2, 2004 6:03:45 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Carl Reaves" <cvoyner@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:4cvZc.1674$Ch1.154@trnddc05...
> Hi All...
>
> Can someone point me in the right direction on how to setup WEP keys
> for my
> wireless network at home? I attempted to do it but all I did was deny
> access to my router... I'm lost..
>
> Please help,
>
> Carl
>
>

First, you *do not* want to set up the router WEP from a wireless
connection. If you do, the router expects to see a wireless that must
be authenticated with the new setting, and of course there is none, and
the wireless is locked out. Use a separate wired computer to set up the
router or alternate wired/wireless to get it done and debugged.

You need either a text passphrase or a hex passphrase. Hex passphrases
are best to deal with since most all equipment understands hexadecimal.
Some routers will convert a text passphrase of your choice to a set of
hexadecimal keys of the proper cypher strength. Cypher strength is
40/64 bit or 104/128 bit with the latter the stronger and more secure.
Note that 40 and 64 are the same, as are 104 and 128. Some vendors use
one or the other for whatever reason. The two strengths are usually
referred to as 64 and 128 bit WEP.

A 40/64 bit text WEP key has 5 characters. A 40/64 bit Hex WEP key has
10 characters. A 104/128 text WEP key has 13 characters; 104/128 Hex
WEP key, 26 characters.

A text key is composed of the upper and lower case 26-letter english
alphabet (actually the ASCII table), plus numbers from 0 to 9 in any
combination. A hex key is composed of the numbers 0 to 9 plus the upper
case letters A through F in any combination.

40/64 bit hex key: 4626DF29CA (10 chars...you get the idea)

If the router requires a text phrase, simply enter one *you can
remember* and copy down the first generated key for the selected cypher
strength (64 or 128 bit). Enter that first key in the XP wireless
config log-in dialog and click Connect.

OK, now WEP is established. The next thing to do is to set up the
router for other than the default user name and password (record these),
change the default IP from 192.168.X.1 to X some other number like 223
or 039 or whatever, then set up MAC address filtering for the wireless
at least. You get the MAC address from a label on the wireless card or
PC-Card. The filter setting allows *only* that MAC address to connect.
If you are paranoid enough, change the default radio channel from 6 to 9
or 3 or...
Q
Anonymous
September 2, 2004 9:26:26 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> schreef in bericht
news:p oSdnd1-W6ZoEKvcRVn-tA@comcast.com...
>
> "Carl Reaves" <cvoyner@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:4cvZc.1674$Ch1.154@trnddc05...
> > Hi All...

> A 40/64 bit text WEP key has 5 characters. A 40/64 bit Hex WEP key has
> 10 characters. A 104/128 text WEP key has 13 characters; 104/128 Hex
> WEP key, 26 characters.

I tryed 3438CF0123456789A987654321, (104/128 Hex WEP key, 26 characters).
Is this key wrong? it didn't work for me.


The Penguin
Related resources
Anonymous
September 3, 2004 12:19:16 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

The Penguin wrote:

> I tryed 3438CF0123456789A987654321, (104/128 Hex WEP key, 26 characters).
> Is this key wrong? it didn't work for me.

The key looks a little simple, but valid.

On the other hand it may be stupid to use this key again after posting it
here...

Thomas
Anonymous
September 3, 2004 1:59:28 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Thomas Kr├╝ger" <thomas.krueger@gmx.net> schreef in bericht
news:ch7o77$96u$06$1@news.t-online.com...
> The Penguin wrote:
>
> > I tryed 3438CF0123456789A987654321, (104/128 Hex WEP key, 26
characters).
> > Is this key wrong? it didn't work for me.
>
> The key looks a little simple, but valid.
>
> On the other hand it may be stupid to use this key again after posting it
> here...

I don't use it again, but it's valid, so I have an other problem.

Thanx,

The Penguin
Anonymous
September 3, 2004 2:19:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

OK - all I have is my laptop and a wireless router.. so what you are saying
is hardwire it to set it up, and then I can use the same key wirelessly??

Thanks again,

Carl



"Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
news:p oSdnd1-W6ZoEKvcRVn-tA@comcast.com...
>
> "Carl Reaves" <cvoyner@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:4cvZc.1674$Ch1.154@trnddc05...
> > Hi All...
> >
> > Can someone point me in the right direction on how to setup WEP keys
> > for my
> > wireless network at home? I attempted to do it but all I did was deny
> > access to my router... I'm lost..
> >
> > Please help,
> >
> > Carl
> >
> >
>
> First, you *do not* want to set up the router WEP from a wireless
> connection. If you do, the router expects to see a wireless that must
> be authenticated with the new setting, and of course there is none, and
> the wireless is locked out. Use a separate wired computer to set up the
> router or alternate wired/wireless to get it done and debugged.
>
> You need either a text passphrase or a hex passphrase. Hex passphrases
> are best to deal with since most all equipment understands hexadecimal.
> Some routers will convert a text passphrase of your choice to a set of
> hexadecimal keys of the proper cypher strength. Cypher strength is
> 40/64 bit or 104/128 bit with the latter the stronger and more secure.
> Note that 40 and 64 are the same, as are 104 and 128. Some vendors use
> one or the other for whatever reason. The two strengths are usually
> referred to as 64 and 128 bit WEP.
>
> A 40/64 bit text WEP key has 5 characters. A 40/64 bit Hex WEP key has
> 10 characters. A 104/128 text WEP key has 13 characters; 104/128 Hex
> WEP key, 26 characters.
>
> A text key is composed of the upper and lower case 26-letter english
> alphabet (actually the ASCII table), plus numbers from 0 to 9 in any
> combination. A hex key is composed of the numbers 0 to 9 plus the upper
> case letters A through F in any combination.
>
> 40/64 bit hex key: 4626DF29CA (10 chars...you get the idea)
>
> If the router requires a text phrase, simply enter one *you can
> remember* and copy down the first generated key for the selected cypher
> strength (64 or 128 bit). Enter that first key in the XP wireless
> config log-in dialog and click Connect.
>
> OK, now WEP is established. The next thing to do is to set up the
> router for other than the default user name and password (record these),
> change the default IP from 192.168.X.1 to X some other number like 223
> or 039 or whatever, then set up MAC address filtering for the wireless
> at least. You get the MAC address from a label on the wireless card or
> PC-Card. The filter setting allows *only* that MAC address to connect.
> If you are paranoid enough, change the default radio channel from 6 to 9
> or 3 or...
> Q
>
>
Anonymous
September 3, 2004 12:44:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"The Penguin" <not_home@all.nl> wrote in message
news:41373b9e$0$30776$e4fe514c@dreader16.news.xs4all.nl...
>
> "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> schreef in bericht
> news:p oSdnd1-W6ZoEKvcRVn-tA@comcast.com...
>>
>> "Carl Reaves" <cvoyner@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:4cvZc.1674$Ch1.154@trnddc05...
>> > Hi All...
>
>> A 40/64 bit text WEP key has 5 characters. A 40/64 bit Hex WEP key
>> has
>> 10 characters. A 104/128 text WEP key has 13 characters; 104/128 Hex
>> WEP key, 26 characters.
>
> I tryed 3438CF0123456789A987654321, (104/128 Hex WEP key, 26
> characters).
> Is this key wrong? it didn't work for me.
>
>
> The Penguin
>
>The router/access point must be set for the same key. It must be
>toggled for the correct cypher strength. So must the wireless card.
>Try a 64 bit key first, see if that works. Broadcast SSID. Use Open
>key rather than Shared key. Also, do you connect without security?
>Using Wireless (Zero) Configuration (Let Windows manage this
>connection)?

Q

Q
Anonymous
September 3, 2004 12:52:36 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Carl Reaves" <cvoyner@gmail.com> wrote in message
news:p %MZc.1898$UR2.309@trnddc08...
> OK - all I have is my laptop and a wireless router.. so what you are
> saying
> is hardwire it to set it up, and then I can use the same key
> wirelessly??
>
> Thanks again,
>
> Carl
>
>
>
> "Quaoar" <quaoar@tenthplanet.net> wrote in message
> news:p oSdnd1-W6ZoEKvcRVn-tA@comcast.com...
>>
>> "Carl Reaves" <cvoyner@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:4cvZc.1674$Ch1.154@trnddc05...
>> > Hi All...
>> >
>> > Can someone point me in the right direction on how to setup WEP
>> > keys
>> > for my
>> > wireless network at home? I attempted to do it but all I did was
>> > deny
>> > access to my router... I'm lost..
>> >
>> > Please help,
>> >
>> > Carl
>> >
>> >
>>
>> First, you *do not* want to set up the router WEP from a wireless
>> connection. If you do, the router expects to see a wireless that
>> must
>> be authenticated with the new setting, and of course there is none,
>> and
>> the wireless is locked out. Use a separate wired computer to set up
>> the
>> router or alternate wired/wireless to get it done and debugged.
>>
>> You need either a text passphrase or a hex passphrase. Hex
>> passphrases
>> are best to deal with since most all equipment understands
>> hexadecimal.
>> Some routers will convert a text passphrase of your choice to a set
>> of
>> hexadecimal keys of the proper cypher strength. Cypher strength is
>> 40/64 bit or 104/128 bit with the latter the stronger and more
>> secure.
>> Note that 40 and 64 are the same, as are 104 and 128. Some vendors
>> use
>> one or the other for whatever reason. The two strengths are usually
>> referred to as 64 and 128 bit WEP.
>>
>> A 40/64 bit text WEP key has 5 characters. A 40/64 bit Hex WEP key
>> has
>> 10 characters. A 104/128 text WEP key has 13 characters; 104/128 Hex
>> WEP key, 26 characters.
>>
>> A text key is composed of the upper and lower case 26-letter english
>> alphabet (actually the ASCII table), plus numbers from 0 to 9 in any
>> combination. A hex key is composed of the numbers 0 to 9 plus the
>> upper
>> case letters A through F in any combination.
>>
>> 40/64 bit hex key: 4626DF29CA (10 chars...you get the idea)
>>
>> If the router requires a text phrase, simply enter one *you can
>> remember* and copy down the first generated key for the selected
>> cypher
>> strength (64 or 128 bit). Enter that first key in the XP wireless
>> config log-in dialog and click Connect.
>>
>> OK, now WEP is established. The next thing to do is to set up the
>> router for other than the default user name and password (record
>> these),
>> change the default IP from 192.168.X.1 to X some other number like
>> 223
>> or 039 or whatever, then set up MAC address filtering for the
>> wireless
>> at least. You get the MAC address from a label on the wireless card
>> or
>> PC-Card. The filter setting allows *only* that MAC address to
>> connect.
>> If you are paranoid enough, change the default radio channel from 6
>> to 9
>> or 3 or...
>> Q
>>
>>
>
>

Wired does not require security so there is no problem (!) setting up
the parameters you want in the router. What happens is that once you
Save the wireless security settings to the router, it disconnects your
wireless until you establish the same parameters in the laptop's card.
That's OK as long as you know how you set up the router, but getting
back into the router is now a problem if you need to make changes. If
there is an error, all too common with a new user/new setup, it becomes
difficult to debug since the laptop wireless gets locked out if there is
a problem. Perhaps a friend might have another laptop to connect wired
for the ten minutes you need to get set up. BTW, someone might want to
chime in here about the case of the hex key. My son says his MS
equipment uses lower case for the hex.

Q
!