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How can I increase wireless range for a notebook

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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 6, 2004 11:18:03 PM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
router.

For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?

Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
to reduce it any further.

Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
antenna, which one would best increase the range?

Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

John
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 1:52:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"John Mason" <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote in message
news:c39efe27.0409061818.3be4e896@posting.google.com...
>I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> router.
>
> For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
>
> Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> to reduce it any further.
>
> Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> antenna, which one would best increase the range?
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> John

YOu can certainly add a USB wireless adapter to your laptop. However, you
can only use it or the built in one at a time. Its advantage is to allow
placement of the antenna that may make a big difference. If you can return
a device with full refund and no stocking charge, cheap and easy to try out.

AGree that an antenna on your access point, or changing its location in the
basement, or even changing the orientation of the antennas - from vertical
to horizontal may make a good difference.

Any way to run an ethernet cable from the basement to the first floor or
attic and put your wireless up there?

--
Bob Alston

bobalston9 AT aol DOT com


---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 6:28:13 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

maybe try making some reflectors your routers antennas or perhaps buy it
some juicer antenni
http://www.linksys.com/press/press.asp?prid=164

"John Mason" <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote in message
news:c39efe27.0409061818.3be4e896@posting.google.com...
> I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> router.
>
> For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
>
> Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> to reduce it any further.
>
> Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> antenna, which one would best increase the range?
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> John
Related resources
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 8:29:41 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

John Mason <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote:
> For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my

http://www.freeantennas.com shows some free reflector designs that you can
make from a cookie sheet or a piece of cardboard.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
September 7, 2004 8:58:16 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

you can put a directional antenna on your router
or an omni-directional on it. I have the router in my office and the antenna
is in the attic.
I get good connections all around my property. The antenna cost me 79
dollars
and a few more bucks for the wire and connector to the router.
"John Mason" <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote in message
news:c39efe27.0409061818.3be4e896@posting.google.com...
>I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> router.
>
> For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
>
> Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> to reduce it any further.
>
> Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> antenna, which one would best increase the range?
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> John
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 10:06:11 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

A 200mW access point/router instead of the 30Mw Linksys fixed it for me.

http://www.senao.com.tw/english/product/Product_wireles...


John Mason wrote:

> I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> router.
>
> For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
>
> Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> to reduce it any further.
>
> Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> antenna, which one would best increase the range?
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> John
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 11:42:47 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"John Mason" <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote in message
news:c39efe27.0409061818.3be4e896@posting.google.com...
>I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> router.
>
> For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
>
> Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> to reduce it any further.
>
> Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> antenna, which one would best increase the range?
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> John

If your cable bandwidth is measured via the wired computer, you need to
investigate the reduction. Connect your laptop directly by ethernet to
the modem and do the measurement there. www.dslreports.com has a pretty
good set of speed measurements and their tweak guide. Access the
Linksys modem's power measurements (http://192.168.100.1, usually) and
review the upstream/downstream power. If the power is not within the
normal range for cable (-10 to +10 down, less than 40 dBmV up), then you
should have a service call to find the source of the speed reduction -
usually a line drop or filtering problem. You pay for 3Mb/s down and
you should get at least 2.5Mb/s.

The main issue is well covered by the other responders.

Q
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 6:56:39 PM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

What is the name and model number of the 200mW access point/router
that you purchased?

John

Airman Thunderbird <airman.basic@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<Bd2dnaJ5QqNnCKDcRVn-hA@netdoor.com>...
> A 200mW access point/router instead of the 30Mw Linksys fixed it for me.
>
> http://www.senao.com.tw/english/product/Product_wireles...
>
>
> John Mason wrote:
>
> > I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> > Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> > Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> > turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> > the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> > router.
> >
> > For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> > located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> > limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> > notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> > wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> > notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> > wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> > to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
> >
> > Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> > considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> > that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> > http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> > Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> > to reduce it any further.
> >
> > Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> > antenna, which one would best increase the range?
> >
> > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
> >
> > John
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 6:56:49 PM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

What is the name and model number of the 200mW access point/router
that you purchased?

John

Airman Thunderbird <airman.basic@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<Bd2dnaJ5QqNnCKDcRVn-hA@netdoor.com>...
> A 200mW access point/router instead of the 30Mw Linksys fixed it for me.
>
> http://www.senao.com.tw/english/product/Product_wireles...
>
>
> John Mason wrote:
>
> > I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> > Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> > Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> > turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> > the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> > router.
> >
> > For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> > located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> > limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> > notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> > wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> > notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> > wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> > to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
> >
> > Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> > considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> > that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> > http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> > Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> > to reduce it any further.
> >
> > Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> > antenna, which one would best increase the range?
> >
> > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
> >
> > John
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 1:14:53 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

http://wisp-depot.com/catalog/product_info.php?manufact...

NL-2611 CB3+ Deluxe



John Mason wrote:
> What is the name and model number of the 200mW access point/router
> that you purchased?
>
> John
>
> Airman Thunderbird <airman.basic@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<Bd2dnaJ5QqNnCKDcRVn-hA@netdoor.com>...
>
>>A 200mW access point/router instead of the 30Mw Linksys fixed it for me.
>>
>>http://www.senao.com.tw/english/product/Product_wireles...
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 2:47:22 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"John Mason" <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote in message
news:c39efe27.0409071356.336ca06b@posting.google.com...
> What is the name and model number of the 200mW access point/router
> that you purchased?
>
> John \\

SMC shows a 200mw 802.11g PrismGT/Nitro Router at a reasonable price for the
typical home LAN.
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 6:44:42 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

The Engenius NL-2611CB3DL ain't cheap, but desperate measures for
desperate folks. I have a few comments, assumptions, and questions.

1. Although it is 802.11b compliant, my Linksys WRT54GS is backward
802.11b compliant. Therefore, I assume that they should be able to
communicate with each other.

2. I would like to use the NL-2611CB3DL in infrastructure mode.

3. The configuration I would prefer is something like the following.
My question is whether it will work:

Linksys modem ---> Linksys WRT54GS router ---> NL-2611CB3DL --->
Notebook

4. If the above configuration works, would I use the NL-2611CB3DL as a
bridge or as an access point?

5. Could I locate the NL-2611CB3DL at some distance from the Linksys
WRT54GS router or would I have to connect it to the router with an
Ethernet cable?

Hope to hear from you.

John


Airman Thunderbird <airman.basic@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<feKdnUyx4ut396PcRVn-hA@netdoor.com>...
> http://wisp-depot.com/catalog/product_info.php?manufact...
>
> NL-2611 CB3+ Deluxe
>
>
>
> John Mason wrote:
> > What is the name and model number of the 200mW access point/router
> > that you purchased?
> >
> > John
> >
> > Airman Thunderbird <airman.basic@gmail.com> wrote in message news:<Bd2dnaJ5QqNnCKDcRVn-hA@netdoor.com>...
> >
> >>A 200mW access point/router instead of the 30Mw Linksys fixed it for me.
> >>
> >>http://www.senao.com.tw/english/product/Product_wireles...
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 7:58:58 AM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

A repeater may help. You say that you are only getting 1-2 mbps now. If a
repeater would you get 11 mbps (full strength), even when it is halved due
to having to repeat the information, you would still have 5 mbps. That is
better than you have now.

Jeff

"John Mason" <jomason@cba.ua.edu> wrote in message
news:c39efe27.0409061818.3be4e896@posting.google.com...
>I currently have at home a Dell notebook with Intel Centrino
> Technology and a Pentium IV desktop. The desktop is connected via a
> Belkin FastCat5E Ethernet cable to a Linksys WRT54GS router, which in
> turn is connected to a Linksys BEFCMU10 cable modem. The notebook has
> the Intel Centrino Technology wireless connection to the Linksys
> router.
>
> For certain reasons beyond my control, the modem and router are
> located in the basement at one end of my home. As a result, this
> limits my notebook's wireless range when on the first floor. Since my
> notebook has three USB ports, could I add to my notebook a USB network
> wireless adapter with a high gain antenna without doing away with the
> notebook's built-in wireless adapter and perhaps gain additional
> wireless range? Also, what are some pointers on adding the USB adapter
> to the notebook without losing the built-in wireless adapter?
>
> Are there any other options to increase the wireless range? I
> considered adding the Linksys WRE54G expander, but many reviewers said
> that would decrease the bandwidth. Since, according to
> http://www.pcpitstop.com, my downstream bandwidth is only about 1.5
> Mbits, when the cable company advertises it as 3 Mbits, I don't want
> to reduce it any further.
>
> Finally, if I go with a USB wireless network adapter with a high gain
> antenna, which one would best increase the range?
>
> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
>
> John
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 6:03:51 PM

Archived from groups: comp.laptops,alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

My setup uses the NL-2611 as an access point connected by ethernet cable
to an 8 port Linksys switch, which is connected to a one port Linksys
router, connected to a Speedstream DSL modem. Have one desktop and
several laptops running wirelessly networked and 3 desktops wired to the
switch.

Sounds needlessly complicated, I know, but this setup evolved over time,
with new hardware arrivals periodically.

BTW, I tried the repeater route, with a couple of Dlink 900AP+ units. It
worked, after a fashion. Just a 50% reduction in throughput dosen't
sound like much with an 11 MB rate to start with, but I found the reason
for the reduction is that the repeater radio has to receive the file
data, then pass it on. Not to bad with large files, but having to
receive data on innumerable small files decreases the throughput almost
exponentially, if I'm making any sense to you.

Anyway, the stronger signal doubled my range or better, with better
throughput overall.

John Mason wrote:
> The Engenius NL-2611CB3DL ain't cheap, but desperate measures for
> desperate folks. I have a few comments, assumptions, and questions.
>
> 1. Although it is 802.11b compliant, my Linksys WRT54GS is backward
> 802.11b compliant. Therefore, I assume that they should be able to
> communicate with each other.
>
> 2. I would like to use the NL-2611CB3DL in infrastructure mode.
>
> 3. The configuration I would prefer is something like the following.
> My question is whether it will work:
>
> Linksys modem ---> Linksys WRT54GS router ---> NL-2611CB3DL --->
> Notebook
>
> 4. If the above configuration works, would I use the NL-2611CB3DL as a
> bridge or as an access point?
>
> 5. Could I locate the NL-2611CB3DL at some distance from the Linksys
> WRT54GS router or would I have to connect it to the router with an
> Ethernet cable?
>
> Hope to hear from you.
>
!