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Comcast and wireless

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September 7, 2004 3:46:56 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

The problem is that although I've assembled, upgraded and fixed many, many
computers over the past decade and a half, I know beans about networking.
:-( However, I'm just going to dive in head-first and sink or swim. I'll
never learn this stuff otherwise.

The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register the
MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network. After
that, I want to set up a wireless AP and connect four computers to it to
share Internet access. I've already installed the four wireless network
cards, and all four have detected the router; the signal strength is
anywhere from "good to "excellent," depending on where the individual
computer is located in the house.

What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the router
(a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes. Instead, I want
to use Linksys' router-/network-config software (or simply log onto the
router via http://192.168.blah.blah and do it manually by entering all the
needed info into the required fields). The Comcast guy will of course have
to give me the information that I'll need (IP address, mail and news server
names, etc.)

After I'm sure that everything is working, I'll change the SSID and enable
WEP. I think I'm supposed to do something with DCHP, too, but even after all
the online searching I did, I'm still not 100 percent sure precisely what it
is and how I'm supposed to use it. There is also a MAC address for each
wireless card, and I understand that I can somehow restrict access to the
network to only those addresses.

I really want to set everything up manually, but if anyone has any advice
(especially pitfalls that I should avoid), please post a reply. After I get
up to speed with wireless networking and become proficient with it, I'll
return the favor for other newbies.

More about : comcast wireless

Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 3:46:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

All the cable guy needs to do is open up a browser window and connect to a
particular web site. Do not let him install the Comcast software (which he
will try to do since it automates the installation process a bit). Also,
keep the router out of sight during the installation and just have him use a
computer that can be directly connected to the cable modem. This computer
needs to have an ethernet port and he may need administrator access if the
TCP/IP settings need to be changed.

Once the cable modem is up and running, configure your wireless router and
access cards to use WPA-PSK encryption (much better than WEP). That will
keep other people out. Your router should be set to obtain its IP address
from the cable modem's DHCP server (this is the default). Your computers
should be set to obtain their IP addresses via the router's DHCP server
(also the default). Keep in mind that wireless settings should only be
changed using a wired connection to the router.

Your cable modem will probably be found at 192.168.100.1 although you will
probably not be able to make any configuration changes to it. It will be
set to assign a single internet-reachable IP address. Thus, you may need to
turn it off and back on again after you detach your computer and connect
your router. Cable modems need a minute or so to get back on-line after
they have been turned off and on.

-Yves

"Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:10jqbpd2irpco56@corp.supernews.com...
> The problem is that although I've assembled, upgraded and fixed many, many
> computers over the past decade and a half, I know beans about networking.
> :-( However, I'm just going to dive in head-first and sink or swim.
> I'll
> never learn this stuff otherwise.
>
> The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
> house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register
> the
> MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network. After
> that, I want to set up a wireless AP and connect four computers to it to
> share Internet access. I've already installed the four wireless network
> cards, and all four have detected the router; the signal strength is
> anywhere from "good to "excellent," depending on where the individual
> computer is located in the house.
>
> What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
> software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the
> router
> (a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes. Instead, I
> want
> to use Linksys' router-/network-config software (or simply log onto the
> router via http://192.168.blah.blah and do it manually by entering all the
> needed info into the required fields). The Comcast guy will of course have
> to give me the information that I'll need (IP address, mail and news
> server
> names, etc.)
>
> After I'm sure that everything is working, I'll change the SSID and enable
> WEP. I think I'm supposed to do something with DCHP, too, but even after
> all
> the online searching I did, I'm still not 100 percent sure precisely what
> it
> is and how I'm supposed to use it. There is also a MAC address for each
> wireless card, and I understand that I can somehow restrict access to the
> network to only those addresses.
>
> I really want to set everything up manually, but if anyone has any advice
> (especially pitfalls that I should avoid), please post a reply. After I
> get
> up to speed with wireless networking and become proficient with it, I'll
> return the favor for other newbies.
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 3:46:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Mon, 6 Sep 2004 23:46:56 -0400, "Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net>
wrote:

>The problem is that although I've assembled, upgraded and fixed many, many
>computers over the past decade and a half, I know beans about networking.
>:-( However, I'm just going to dive in head-first and sink or swim. I'll
>never learn this stuff otherwise.

Yep. That's the way we all learn. Some good web piles for reading
and research are:
http://www.tomsnetworking.com
http://www.practicallynetworked.com
http://www.dslreports.com
There are quite a few FAQ's, white papers, how-to's, and tutorials on
wireless on these web piles.

>The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
>house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register the
>MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network. After
>that, I want to set up a wireless AP and connect four computers to it to
>share Internet access.

Careful here. Comcast's miserably written TOS (terms of service)
specify that you can only attach one computah, can't build a LAN,
can't terminate a VPN, can't use it for business purposes, and can't
attach a wireless network. This is despite the minor detail that
Comcast sells WG200 wireless modem/routers.
http://www.comcast.net/terms/
Methinks you might find it best not to mention wireless, LAN's, and
multiple computahs to the Comcast installer.

>I've already installed the four wireless network
>cards, and all four have detected the router; the signal strength is
>anywhere from "good to "excellent," depending on where the individual
>computer is located in the house.

If you can see the HTML setup page of your wireless router from each
computah, you're 90% there.

>What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
>software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the router
>(a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes. Instead, I want
>to use Linksys' router-/network-config software (or simply log onto the
>router via http://192.168.blah.blah and do it manually by entering all the
>needed info into the required fields).

So much for hiding the router. Well, you can't have it both ways.
Either you inform the installer that you've got a router, or you
install the software and remove it later. Actually, all he needs to
do is register the MAC address with the CMTS and you're on with DHCP.
There's nothing to configure. If something screws up when you attach
the router, go into the config page and clone the MAC address of the
router. The IP layers are assigned via DHCP so there's very little
you need to do in the way of configuring the WRT54G.

>The Comcast guy will of course have
>to give me the information that I'll need (IP address, mail and news server
>names, etc.)

Your serious? I doubt he/she even knows how to setup those. Once
you're able to surf the web, they're done.

Go unto the help pages and RTFM:
http://online.comcast.net/help/?CM.src=left
SMTP (outgoing) smtp.comcast.net
POP3 (incoming) mail.comcast.net
For Usenet, Comcast uses Giganews. You'll need to setup an account:
http://online.comcast.net/giganews/
Usenet news news.comcast.giganews.com

You're on your own for dynamic DNS and other services.

>After I'm sure that everything is working, I'll change the SSID and enable
>WEP. I think I'm supposed to do something with DCHP, too, but even after all
>the online searching I did, I'm still not 100 percent sure precisely what it
>is and how I'm supposed to use it. There is also a MAC address for each
>wireless card, and I understand that I can somehow restrict access to the
>network to only those addresses.

Sigh. Yes, you're suppose to do something with DNS. It's quite
simple. Setup the WAN (Comcast) side for DHCP assigned IP settings.
On the LAN (wireless) side, make sure the DHCP server is enabled.
That's it. Since you're apparently able to connect to the config web
page in the router, the LAN part is done and working.

>I really want to set everything up manually, but if anyone has any advice
>(especially pitfalls that I should avoid), please post a reply.

Avoid manually settings you know nothing about. Leave the defaults
alone until you understand the settings. Once it's working, you can
do the "learn by destroying" exercises. There are lots of setting in
the router available to screw things up.

>After I get
>up to speed with wireless networking and become proficient with it, I'll
>return the favor for other newbies.

Getting decent answers is difficult. When you get it together, dive
into a newsgroup or mailing list and answer some beginners questions.
That's the way I learned quite a bit on various topics.



--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
Related resources
September 7, 2004 8:54:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

well it is pretty simple just get a direct connect to one of your machines
after he leaves setup your network. Just don't mention the network to him.
"Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:10jqbpd2irpco56@corp.supernews.com...
> The problem is that although I've assembled, upgraded and fixed many, many
> computers over the past decade and a half, I know beans about networking.
> :-( However, I'm just going to dive in head-first and sink or swim.
> I'll
> never learn this stuff otherwise.
>
> The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
> house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register
> the
> MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network. After
> that, I want to set up a wireless AP and connect four computers to it to
> share Internet access. I've already installed the four wireless network
> cards, and all four have detected the router; the signal strength is
> anywhere from "good to "excellent," depending on where the individual
> computer is located in the house.
>
> What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
> software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the
> router
> (a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes. Instead, I
> want
> to use Linksys' router-/network-config software (or simply log onto the
> router via http://192.168.blah.blah and do it manually by entering all the
> needed info into the required fields). The Comcast guy will of course have
> to give me the information that I'll need (IP address, mail and news
> server
> names, etc.)
>
> After I'm sure that everything is working, I'll change the SSID and enable
> WEP. I think I'm supposed to do something with DCHP, too, but even after
> all
> the online searching I did, I'm still not 100 percent sure precisely what
> it
> is and how I'm supposed to use it. There is also a MAC address for each
> wireless card, and I understand that I can somehow restrict access to the
> network to only those addresses.
>
> I really want to set everything up manually, but if anyone has any advice
> (especially pitfalls that I should avoid), please post a reply. After I
> get
> up to speed with wireless networking and become proficient with it, I'll
> return the favor for other newbies.
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 7:52:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Hackworth <spamless@nospam.net> wrote:
> The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
> house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register the
> MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network. After

I didn't care what the cable guy did when he arrived, I figured I would
undo it afterward. It turned out that because I already had email
configured for a POP3 server, which he discovered while stepping through
some preinstall checklist, he didn't install any software on my computer.

All he did was change my static IP address to DHCP.

I didn't have a router at the time, I just had a 10MbpS hub. He uncabled
that and ran cat5 from the PC to the cable modem, and my wife was surfing
when I came home.

I disconnected the cat5, plugged my router in place, and promptly failed to
surf ;-(. I had already called Mediacom tech support, and they told me to
just call in with the MAC address of my router when I was ready, and told
me I would not be able to surf before I gave them the MAC.

I chose instead to "clone" the MAC of the PC used for the install onto my
router. Most offer that ability. On my SMC, it is one keyclick. On some
others, you type in the MAC address that you want to use.



Months later, when a cable tech changed the cable modem, he had to wire
directly from PC to cable modem. He wasn't able to register through the
router.


> that, I want to set up a wireless AP and connect four computers to it to
> share Internet access. I've already installed the four wireless network
> cards, and all four have detected the router; the signal strength is
> anywhere from "good to "excellent," depending on where the individual
> computer is located in the house.

You might take a peak at http://www.freeaantennas.com for some reflectors
to improve the radiation pattern in the house. I used the EZ-10. I might
build the "original" again, now that I have more patience. I tried the
EZ-12, and that didn't seem to work well, almost certainly due to my poor
construction habits ;-) The EZ-10 is EZ.

> What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
> software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the router

I don't think there is any Comcast software. SBC has a pile, because they
have the Yahoo tie-in and PPPoE logins.

I wouldn't have it wired to the router. That will only confuse things, and
he won't be able to do his standard installation. At best, he will unplug
your router. At worst, he won't realize it is causing the problem, and
fail to complete the installation for unknown reasons. I was there when a
tech installed a new modem on my working system. It wouldn't connect to
the registration page, and all he could do is retype the registration page
ip address, close the browser, open a new one, try again...
This was Mediacom, but I doubt that it is much different.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 8:21:02 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:10jqbpd2irpco56@corp.supernews.com...
[snip]
> The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
> house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register
the
> MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network.
[snip]
>
> What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
> software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the
router
> (a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes.
[snip]

I suggest you use dd or Ghost to dump one of the machines into a backup
file, and just let him/her use that machine to install any needed software.
After it's done, simply roll the backup in over the stuff (s)he added.

As a bonus, try to clone the router's native MAC address onto the PC comcast
will use for the install: that means that the router will operate without
MAC cloning when it's plugged in. BTW, Comcast is no longer checking MAC's
in my area, but YMMV.

HTH.

William

(Filter noise from my address for direct replies.)
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 7, 2004 9:16:13 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"William Warren" <william_warren_nonoise@comcast.net> wrote in message
news:o dl%c.19324$vy.3367@attbi_s52...
> "Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net> wrote in message
> news:10jqbpd2irpco56@corp.supernews.com...
> [snip]
>> The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at
>> my
>> house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then
>> register
> the
>> MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network.
> [snip]
>>
>> What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install
>> Comcast's
>> software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the
> router
>> (a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes.
> [snip]
>
> I suggest you use dd or Ghost to dump one of the machines into a
> backup
> file, and just let him/her use that machine to install any needed
> software.
> After it's done, simply roll the backup in over the stuff (s)he added.
>
> As a bonus, try to clone the router's native MAC address onto the PC
> comcast
> will use for the install: that means that the router will operate
> without
> MAC cloning when it's plugged in. BTW, Comcast is no longer checking
> MAC's
> in my area, but YMMV.
>
> HTH.
>
> William
>
> (Filter noise from my address for direct replies.)
>
>

Comcast does not require MAC cloning. Simply remove power from the
cable modem for ten to fifteen seconds and power up with the router
connected but unpowered. Power up the router when the modem has fully
booted. The MAC table in the modem is cleared with the power down.

After the tech leaves your site and before doing anything else, access
the cable modem at http://192.168.100.1 and review the upstream and
downstream power levels to verify your connection. Downstream signal
power should be in the range -10 to +10 (-15 to +15 is the outside
range) and upstream should be less than 40 - 35 or less is desireable.
Go to http://www.broadbandreports.com late at night (2am is good!) and
run a couple of their speed tests. While not definitive, your download
should be at least 2500kB/s and upload, 240kB/s vs. advertised 3000 and
256. Forget the power testing if it is a Tareyon modem which has no
diagnostics (the techs hate it since it makes their work more
difficult). If any of these look particularly bad, immediately make a
call to Comcast support. Comcast responds well to user persistence.

Q
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 5:07:14 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

"Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
news:eqiqj053dg3vfg3dtdf1gbo34jddl0nkdn@4ax.com...
> On Mon, 6 Sep 2004 23:46:56 -0400, "Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net>
> wrote:
>
>>The problem is that although I've assembled, upgraded and fixed many, many
>>computers over the past decade and a half, I know beans about networking.
>>:-( However, I'm just going to dive in head-first and sink or swim.
>>I'll
>>never learn this stuff otherwise.
>
> Yep. That's the way we all learn. Some good web piles for reading
> and research are:
> http://www.tomsnetworking.com
> http://www.practicallynetworked.com
> http://www.dslreports.com
> There are quite a few FAQ's, white papers, how-to's, and tutorials on
> wireless on these web piles.
>
>>The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
>>house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register
>>the
>>MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network. After
>>that, I want to set up a wireless AP and connect four computers to it to
>>share Internet access.
>
> Careful here. Comcast's miserably written TOS (terms of service)
> specify that you can only attach one computah, can't build a LAN,
> can't terminate a VPN, can't use it for business purposes, and can't
> attach a wireless network. This is despite the minor detail that
> Comcast sells WG200 wireless modem/routers.
> http://www.comcast.net/terms/
> Methinks you might find it best not to mention wireless, LAN's, and
> multiple computahs to the Comcast installer.
>

Those TOS agreements are just there in extreme cases or in cases where an
ISP wants to terminate a service for egregious abuse.

Still, it is best not to mention a LAN or Routers and such. Keep them out
of site.

And also it is best, when calling tech support for connection problems, to
disconnect your router and connect the modem directly to your NIC. :) 

Otherwise, because they can't ping your connection, they might suspect a
router.

But generally, it's kind of like "out of sight, out of mind." Comcast and
probably most ISPs aren't going to get all huffed up about Routers, LANs, or
even the sharing of an internet connection.

I'll bet that at least 50% of households who have broadband or DSL share an
internet connection.

Alanb
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 5:51:21 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

Alan Bernardo <master@oforion.net> wrote:

> And also it is best, when calling tech support for connection problems, to
> disconnect your router and connect the modem directly to your NIC. :) 

> Otherwise, because they can't ping your connection, they might suspect a
> router.

I allow ping from the internet to my router.
I'm of the camp that believes the diagnostic benefit outweighs the
potential for harm. No one maliciously probes with ping before doing their
dirty work anymore. They go right for the good ports.

Mediacom was kind of surprised that they could ping my IP address, but it
allowed them to do better troubleshooting, seeing the ping latency
fluctuate all over the place.

--
---
Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 8, 2004 7:44:01 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

On Wed, 08 Sep 2004 01:07:14 GMT, "Alan Bernardo" <master@oforion.net>
wrote:

>Those TOS agreements are just there in extreme cases or in cases where an
>ISP wants to terminate a service for egregious abuse.

It's a common practice in the US to write rediculously restrictive
contracts (and laws) and then claim that it's not important because
they will not be enforced. Of course, when the ISP (or police) need
to play enforcer, the necessary laws are in place.

>And also it is best, when calling tech support for connection problems, to
>disconnect your router and connect the modem directly to your NIC. :) 

Argh. That's pet pieve of mine. SBC and Comcast both demand that
your remove your router/firewall and connect your PC directly to the
modem, before they will offer assistance. That's fine for making
their life easier, but not so smart for the customer. I arrived late
to a customer who made the mistake of doing exactly that. In the 15
minutes it took to slog through tech supports troubleshooting script,
the machine was successfully attacked by at least 2 scripted
virus/worm/spyware scripts. I spent the next hour removing the
junkware and cursing at SBC support.

>Otherwise, because they can't ping your connection, they might suspect a
>router.

For DSL, SBC can do an ATM ping, which will ping the DSL modem, or an
arping to ping by MAC address. SBC can also check the RADIUS server
logs for PPPoE accounts. Comcast has similar capeabilities and some
overpriced network management system that can also detect the modem
without the router.

>I'll bet that at least 50% of households who have broadband or DSL share an
>internet connection.

Looking at my customer base of the last 100 or so DSL installs, my
guess is about 6 of them share connections. Some are fairly afluent
and don't need to save the money. Others are security concious.
However, the greater majority simply don't want the hassle and don't
trust the neighbors.


--
# Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
# 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
# jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
# 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 13, 2004 8:08:15 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

My experience on my comcast account is charged $9.95 for up to 4 extra ip
adresses. But I had cable internet since it was @home. I don't think they
can tell you what to do in your own home IMHO. If you don't want them to
know about any other computers, I would try internet connection sharing, by
keeping the computer connected to the cable modem and install a extra
ethernet card in the computer to rout it to the wireless router.Don't know
if that would work though.


"Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net> wrote in message
news:10jqbpd2irpco56@corp.supernews.com...
> The problem is that although I've assembled, upgraded and fixed many, many
> computers over the past decade and a half, I know beans about networking.
> :-( However, I'm just going to dive in head-first and sink or swim.
> I'll
> never learn this stuff otherwise.
>
> The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
> house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register
> the
> MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network. After
> that, I want to set up a wireless AP and connect four computers to it to
> share Internet access. I've already installed the four wireless network
> cards, and all four have detected the router; the signal strength is
> anywhere from "good to "excellent," depending on where the individual
> computer is located in the house.
>
> What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
> software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the
> router
> (a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes. Instead, I
> want
> to use Linksys' router-/network-config software (or simply log onto the
> router via http://192.168.blah.blah and do it manually by entering all the
> needed info into the required fields). The Comcast guy will of course have
> to give me the information that I'll need (IP address, mail and news
> server
> names, etc.)
>
> After I'm sure that everything is working, I'll change the SSID and enable
> WEP. I think I'm supposed to do something with DCHP, too, but even after
> all
> the online searching I did, I'm still not 100 percent sure precisely what
> it
> is and how I'm supposed to use it. There is also a MAC address for each
> wireless card, and I understand that I can somehow restrict access to the
> network to only those addresses.
>
> I really want to set everything up manually, but if anyone has any advice
> (especially pitfalls that I should avoid), please post a reply. After I
> get
> up to speed with wireless networking and become proficient with it, I'll
> return the favor for other newbies.
>
>
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 13, 2004 8:08:16 PM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> My experience on my comcast account is charged $9.95 for up to 4 extra ip
> adresses. But I had cable internet since it was @home. I don't think they
> can tell you what to do in your own home IMHO. If you don't want them to
> know about any other computers, I would try internet connection sharing,
> by keeping the computer connected to the cable modem and install a extra
> ethernet card in the computer to rout it to the wireless router.Don't know
> if that would work though.

I have that here, a linksys router connects to the CM, and the computers go
from there.
No problems. I recently added a wireless router behind the other one.

--
KC6ETE Dave's Engineering Page, www.dvanhorn.org
Microcontroller Consultant, specializing in Atmel AVR
Anonymous
a b F Wireless
September 14, 2004 8:10:57 AM

Archived from groups: alt.internet.wireless (More info?)

> "Hackworth" <spamless@nospam.net> wrote in message
> news:10jqbpd2irpco56@corp.supernews.com...
>> The Comcast cable guy is coming tomorrow to install a cable modem at my
>> house. All I really want him to do is install the modem, then register
>> the
>> MAC and make sure that the modem is working with Comcast's network.

Right. He may manually enter the MAC address with the ISP, or the cable
modem may simply sense the computer's MAC address. With my Cablevision
service, it's the latter. To change what device I directly connect to the
cable modem, I must power off the cable modem for one minute to make it
forget the MAC address of the attached device.

>> After
>> that, I want to set up a wireless AP

a wireless router

>> and connect four computers to it to
>> share Internet access. I've already installed the four wireless network
>> cards, and all four have detected the router; the signal strength is
>> anywhere from "good to "excellent," depending on where the individual
>> computer is located in the house.
>>
>> What I *don't* want to happen is for the Comcast guy to install Comcast's
>> software onto the computer that will be temporarily hard-wired to the
>> router
>> (a Linksys WRT54G) for installation/configuration purposes.

It's not a travesty if the Comcast guy installs software on your computer,
but it's not necessary.

>> Instead, I want
>> to use Linksys' router-/network-config software (or simply log onto the
>> router via http://192.168.blah.blah and do it manually by entering all
>> the
>> needed info into the required fields).

Yes, you don't need Linksys's software for your computer either.

>> The Comcast guy will of course have
>> to give me the information that I'll need (IP address, mail and news
>> server
>> names, etc.)

Comcast won't have to tell you an IP address. The router will automatically
obtain an IP address from the ISP. You'll also automatically obtain a
subnet mask, a default gateway address, and DNS server addresses. You're
correct about needing the mail server(s) (POP and SMTP, sometimes combined
into one) and the news server. These won't be entered into the router,
though. They go in your mail client and newsreader. The mail and news
server addresses can undoubtedly be obtained from Comcast's web-site; the
installer may not have that information.

>> After I'm sure that everything is working, I'll change the SSID and
>> enable
>> WEP. I think I'm supposed to do something with DCHP, too, but even after
>> all
>> the online searching I did, I'm still not 100 percent sure precisely what
>> it
>> is and how I'm supposed to use it.

DHCP is the protocol that the router will use to obtain an IP address from
the ISP; in so doing, the router will act like a DHCP client. The router
and your computers will also use DHCP for the router to assign IP addresses
to your computers; in this case the router is the DHCP server, and the
computers are the DHCP clients.

>> There is also a MAC address for each
>> wireless card, and I understand that I can somehow restrict access to the
>> network to only those addresses.

After you make live connections from all your computers to the router, the
router will know all the MAC addresses. Then you can choose which MAC
addresses (probably all of them) that you want to be placed in the MAC
security table. It's easier to do it this way than to enter the MAC
addresses by hand.

>> I really want to set everything up manually, but if anyone has any advice
>> (especially pitfalls that I should avoid), please post a reply. After I
>> get
>> up to speed with wireless networking and become proficient with it, I'll
>> return the favor for other newbies.

HTH,
Ron Bandes, CCNP, CTT+, etc.
!